Leslie Scott (British politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Leslie Scott (UK politician))
Jump to: navigation, search

Sir Leslie Frederic Scott, KC (28 October 1869 – 19 May 1950) was a Conservative Party politician in the United Kingdom, and later a senior judge.

Born in 1869, the son of Sir John Scott, the Judicial Advisor to the Khedive of Egypt, and Edgeworth Leonora Hill. Scott was educated at Rugby School and at New College, Oxford. He was called to the bar in 1894, and was a member of both the Middle Temple and the Inner Temple.[1]

He was elected as Member of Parliament (MP) for Liverpool Exchange at the December 1910 general election, and held the seat until he retired from Parliament at the 1929 general election.[2]

Scott was Solicitor General for six months in 1922, until fall of the Lloyd George-led coalition government, and was knighted the same year. He had hoped to be appointed Attorney General, but never reached that office.

He was made a Privy Counsellor in 1927, and after leaving the House of Commons, he returned to his private legal practice. In 1935 he was appointed as an Lord Justice of Appeal, and in 1940 became the senior lord justice. Lord Justice Scott chaired the Committee on Land Utilisation in Rural Areas, established by Lord Reith in 1941; his report was one of the foundations of the 1947 Town and Country Planning Act.[3]

He retired in 1948, and died in Oxford in 1950.


  1. ^ "The Law Officers". The Times. 7 March 1922. p. 12. Retrieved 5 September 2012. (subscription required)
  2. ^ Craig, F. W. S. (1983) [1969]. British parliamentary election results 1918-1949 (3rd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. ISBN 0-900178-06-X. 
  3. ^ Sir Leslie Scott Papers, Archiveshub.ac.uk. Retrieved 28 March 2015

External links[edit]

Wikisource logo Works written by or about Leslie Frederic Scott at Wikisource

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Max Muspratt
Member of Parliament for Liverpool Exchange
Succeeded by
James Philip Reynolds
Political offices
Preceded by
Ernest Pollock
Solicitor General for England and Wales
Succeeded by
Thomas Inskip