Philip Leverhulme Prize

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Leverhulme prize)
Jump to: navigation, search
Philip Leverhulme Prizes
Awarded for "achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising"
Sponsored by Leverhulme Trust
Country United Kingdom
Reward(s) £100,000
Website www.leverhulme.ac.uk/funding/grant-schemes/philip-leverhulme-prizes

The Philip Leverhulme Prize is awarded by the Leverhulme Trust to recognise the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. The prize scheme makes up to thirty awards of £100,000 a year, across a range of academic disciplines.[1][2]

History and criteria[edit]

The award is named after Philip Leverhulme who died in 2000. He was the grandson of William Leverhulme, and was the third Viscount Leverhulme.[1] The prizes are payable, in instalments, over a period of two to three years. Prizes can be used for any purpose which can advance the prize-holder’s research, with the exception of enhancing the prize-holder’s salary.[1][2][3]

Nominees must hold either a permanent post or a long-term fellowship in a UK institution of higher education or research that would extend beyond the duration of the Philip Leverhulme Prize. Those otherwise without salary are not eligible to be nominated. Nominees should normally have been awarded their doctoral degree not more than ten years prior to the closing date.[4]

Awards[edit]

Leverhulme awards are granted annually.[5][6][7]

2017[edit]

In 2017 the prizes were awarded in the following fields:[8]

  • Biological Sciences: Tom Baden, Katie Field, Nick Graham, Kayla King, Andrea Migliano
  • History: Andrew Arsan, Toby Green, David Motadel, Lucie Ryzova, Alice Taylor
  • Law: Pinar Akman, Ana Aliverti, Fiona de Londras, Rosie Harding, Jeff King
  • Mathematics and Statistics: Anders Hansen, Oscar Randal-Williams, Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb, Dominic Vella, Hendrik Weber
  • Philosophy and Theology: Naomi Appleton, Joel Cabrita, John Michael, Ian Phillips, Bryan W Roberts
  • Sociology and Social Policy: David Clifford, Des Fitzgerald, Suzanne Hall, Tim Huijts, Alice Mah

2016[edit]

In 2016 the prizes were awarded in the following fields.[9]

  • Archaeology: Susana Carvalho, Manuel Fernandez-Gotz, Oliver Harris, Camilla Speller, Fraser Sturt
  • Chemistry: John Bower, Scott Cockroft, David Glowacki, Susan Perkin, Aron Walsh
  • Economics: Vasco Carvalho, Camille Landais, Kalina Manova, Uta Schönberg, Fabian Waldinger
  • Engineering: Anna Barnett, Cinzia Casiraghi, David Connolly, Alexandra Silva, Peter Vincent
  • Geography: Katherine Brickell, Vanesa Castán Broto, Mark Graham, Harriet Hawkins, David Thornalley
  • Languages and Literatures: William Abberley, Alexandra Harris, Daisy Hay, Lily Okalani Kahn, Hannah Rohde

2015[edit]

In 2015 the prizes were awarded in the following fields.[10]

  • Classics: Mirko Canevaro, Esther Eidinow, Renaud Gagné, Naoise Mac Sweeney, Laura Swift
  • Earth sciences: John Rudge, James Screen, Karin Sigloch, Dominick Spracklen, Nicholas Tosca
  • Physics: Jacopo Bertolotti, Daniele Faccio, Jo Dunkley, Philip King, Suchitra Sebastian
  • Politics: John Bew, Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Dominik Hangartner, Laura Valentini, Nick Vaughan-Williams
  • Psychology: Caroline Catmur, Bhismadev Chakrabarti, Steve Loughnan, Liz Pellicano, Jonathan Roiser
  • Visual arts: Sara Davidmann, Mattias Frey, Hannah Rickards, Martin Suckling, Corin Sworn

2014[edit]

In 2014, thirty-one prizes were awarded. Recipients include Elizabeth Murchison, Manuel Barcia, Daniel Kráľ, Richard Samworth, and Corinna Ulcigrai.[11] The 2014 subjects were:[11]

  • Biological Sciences
  • History
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Philosophy and Theology
  • Law
  • Sociology and Social Policy

2013[edit]

The 2013 subjects were:[12]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Economics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern languages and Literature
  • Performing and Visual Arts

2012[edit]

The 2012 subjects were:[13]

  • Classics
  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Law
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

2011[edit]

The 2011 subjects were:[14]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages & Literatures
  • Performing & Visual Arts

2010[edit]

The 2010 subjects were:[15]

  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Law
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

2009[edit]

The 2009 subjects were:[16]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages and Literature
  • Performing and Visual Arts

2008[edit]

The 2008 subjects were:[17]

  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Medieval, Early Modern, And Modern History
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Zoology

2007[edit]

The 2007 subjects were:[18]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages and Literature
  • Philosophy and Ethics

2006[edit]

The 2006 subjects were:[19]

  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • History of Art
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Zoology

2005[edit]

The 2005 subjects were:[20]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Modern European Languages and Literature
  • Philosophy and Ethics

2004[edit]

The 2004 subjects were:[21]

  • Anthropology
  • Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Economics
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Medieval, Early Modern and Modern History

2003[edit]

The 2003 subjects were:[22]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Classics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Philosophy and Ethics

2002[edit]

The 2002 subjects were:[23]

  • Software Technology for Information and Communications Technology
  • Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Modern History since 1800
  • Economics
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

2001[edit]

The 2001 subjects were:[24]

  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Classics
  • Engineering
  • Geography
  • Philosophy and Ethics

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Philip Leverhulme Prizes". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  2. ^ a b "Grant Winners". Times Higher Education. 
  3. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prize". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  4. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2012". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  5. ^ "UCL leads UK with most Philip Leverhulme Prize winners". Ucl.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  6. ^ "Leverhulme Trust awards outstanding Management researcher". Lse.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  7. ^ "Leverhulme award for research success". Ed.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  8. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prize Winners 2017" (PDF). Leverhulme.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  9. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prize Winners 2016" (PDF). Leverhulme.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  10. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prize Winners 2015" (PDF). Leverhulme.ac.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  11. ^ a b "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2014" (PDF). The Leverhulme Trust. 
  12. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2013". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  13. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2012". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  14. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2011". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  15. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2010". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  16. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2009". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  17. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2008". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  18. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2007". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  19. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2006". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  20. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2005". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  21. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2004". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  22. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2003". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  23. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2002". The Leverhulme Trust. 
  24. ^ "Philip Leverhulme Prizes 2001". The Leverhulme Trust.