Lewis County, Tennessee

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Lewis County, Tennessee
Lewis County Courthouse, Tennessee.JPG
Lewis County Courthouse, April 2014
Map of Tennessee highlighting Lewis County
Location in the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Founded December 23, 1843
Named for Meriwether Lewis[1]
Seat Hohenwald
Largest city Hohenwald
Area
 • Total 282 sq mi (730 km2)
 • Land 282 sq mi (730 km2)
 • Water 0.4 sq mi (1 km2), 0.1%
Population
 • (2010) 12,161
 • Density 43/sq mi (17/km²)
Congressional district 7th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.lewiscountytn.com

Lewis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,161.[2] Its county seat is Hohenwald.[3] The county is named for explorer Meriwether Lewis, who died and was buried at Grinder's Stand near Hohenwald in 1809.

History[edit]

Meriwether Lewis National Monument and Gravesite, April 2014.

Lewis County was formed in 1843 from parts of Perry, Hickman, Lawrence, Maury and Wayne counties.[1] It was named for explorer Meriwether Lewis of the Lewis and Clark expedition.[4] Lewis's grave is located at the geographic center of the county. The bill for its creation was proposed by Powhatan Gordon in the Tennessee State Senate.[5]

On October 7, 2009, a ceremony was held at the cemetery to commemorate the bicentennial of Lewis's death. A bust of Lewis was presented to the National Park Service, which manages the site.[6]

Lewis County was the site of the Cane Creek Massacre.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 282 square miles (730 km2), of which 282 square miles (730 km2) is land and 0.4 square miles (1.0 km2) (0.1%) is water.[7]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

  • Auntney Hollow State Natural Area
  • Devil's Backbone State Natural Area
  • Dry Branch State Natural Area
  • Hick Hill Wildlife Management Area
  • Langford Branch State Natural Area
  • Laurel Hill Wildlife Management Area
  • Lewis State Forest

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 4,438
1860 2,241 −49.5%
1870 1,986 −11.4%
1880 2,181 9.8%
1890 2,555 17.1%
1900 4,455 74.4%
1910 6,033 35.4%
1920 5,707 −5.4%
1930 5,258 −7.9%
1940 5,849 11.2%
1950 6,078 3.9%
1960 6,269 3.1%
1970 6,761 7.8%
1980 9,700 43.5%
1990 9,247 −4.7%
2000 11,367 22.9%
2010 12,161 7.0%
Est. 2016 11,904 [8] −2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2014[2]
Age pyramid Lewis County[13]

As of the census[14] of 2000, there were 11,367 people, 4,381 households, and 3,215 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 people per square mile (16/km²). There were 4,821 housing units at an average density of 17 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.07% White, 1.45% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.29% from other races, and 0.80% from two or more races. 1.20% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,381 households out of which 33.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.90% were married couples living together, 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.60% were non-families. 23.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.80% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 13.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,444, and the median income for a family was $35,972. Males had a median income of $27,060 versus $19,847 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,664. About 10.30% of families and 13.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.60% of those under age 18 and 12.20% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Census-designated place[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

  • Aethra
  • Bachelder
  • Blondy
  • Buffalo Valley
  • Gordonsburg
  • Kimmins
  • Kitchens
  • Lomax Crossroads
  • Metal Ford
  • Napier
  • Oak Grove
  • Providence
  • Riverside
  • Ruppertown
  • Salem
  • Shubert
  • Sweetwater
  • Theodore
  • Voorhies
  • West Hohenwald

Politics[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 77.6% 3,585 19.3% 890 3.2% 147
2012 66.4% 3,117 30.8% 1,447 2.8% 130
2008 61.1% 2,951 37.3% 1,804 1.6% 79
2004 55.8% 2,819 43.4% 2,192 0.9% 43
2000 46.1% 2,037 51.6% 2,281 2.3% 102
1996 36.1% 1,298 54.8% 1,971 9.1% 329
1992 29.3% 1,218 60.0% 2,491 10.7% 443
1988 48.0% 1,324 51.4% 1,419 0.7% 18
1984 52.4% 1,733 47.1% 1,556 0.5% 17
1980 32.5% 1,076 66.2% 2,190 1.3% 43
1976 20.3% 617 78.8% 2,391 0.9% 28
1972 47.0% 1,056 50.6% 1,138 2.4% 54
1968 17.9% 455 42.8% 1,088 39.3% 997
1964 15.8% 388 84.2% 2,061
1960 25.1% 580 74.5% 1,723 0.4% 9
1956 28.2% 522 71.3% 1,321 0.6% 11
1952 29.1% 540 70.4% 1,308 0.6% 11
1948 23.3% 381 70.2% 1,148 6.5% 107
1944 20.9% 252 79.1% 955
1940 21.5% 368 78.3% 1,343 0.3% 5
1936 23.7% 331 76.3% 1,068
1932 14.6% 137 85.4% 799
1928 39.4% 269 60.6% 414
1924 36.3% 191 58.9% 310 4.8% 25
1920 52.3% 446 47.3% 403 0.5% 4
1916 51.3% 414 48.0% 387 0.7% 6
1912 19.5% 126 57.3% 370 23.2% 150

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Marjorie Graves, "Lewis County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: 21 October 2013.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 3, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 185. 
  5. ^ White, John A. (June 26, 1910). "Lewis. Awful Tragedy Connected With Name of the County". The Tennessean. p. 30. Retrieved September 28, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. (Registration required (help)). The bill creating the County of Lewis was introduced by the Hon. Powhatan Gordon, of Maury County, the main purpose of the bill being to perpetuate the name of Lewis. 
  6. ^ "First National Memorial Service for Meriwether Lewis, 21 August 2009. Retrieved: 21 October 2013.
  7. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 7, 2015. 
  13. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  14. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  15. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°31′N 87°29′W / 35.52°N 87.49°W / 35.52; -87.49