Lewistown, Illinois

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Lewistown, ILlinois
City
Country United States
State Illinois
County Fulton
Township Lewistown
Elevation 583 ft (178 m)
Coordinates 40°23′47″N 90°9′17″W / 40.39639°N 90.15472°W / 40.39639; -90.15472Coordinates: 40°23′47″N 90°9′17″W / 40.39639°N 90.15472°W / 40.39639; -90.15472
Area 2.00 sq mi (5 km2)
 - land 2.00 sq mi (5 km2)
 - water 0.00 sq mi (0 km2)
Population 2,384 (2010)
Density 1,192.1/sq mi (460/km2)
Timezone CST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Postal code 61542
Area code 309
Location of Lewistown within Illinois
Location of Lewistown within Illinois
Wikimedia Commons: Lewistown, Illinois
Website: lewistownillinois.org

Lewistown is a city in Fulton County, Illinois, United States. It was named by its founder, Ossian M. Ross, after his oldest son, Lewis W. Ross.[1] The population was 2,384 at the 2010 census,[2] down from 2,522 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Fulton County.[3] Located in central Illinois, it is southwest of Peoria. It is the source of Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters, who lived there. Native American burial mounds are nearby at Dickson Mounds off Illinois Route 97.

History[edit]

The city was named for Lewis Ross, the son of a first settler.[4] The Lewistown post office has been in operation since 1831.[5] It contains a tempera on canvas mural titled Lewiston Milestones, painted by Ida Abelman in 1941, depicting the Lincoln–Douglas debates.[6] Murals were produced from 1934 to 1943 in the United States through the Section of Painting and Sculpture, later called the Section of Fine Arts, of the U.S. Treasury Department.

Geography[edit]

Lewistown is located in central Fulton County at 40°23′47″N 90°9′17″W / 40.39639°N 90.15472°W / 40.39639; -90.15472 (40.396254, -90.154609).[7] U.S. Route 24 passes through the center of the city, leading northeast 40 miles (64 km) to Peoria and southwest 89 miles (143 km) to Quincy. Illinois Route 97 leads north from Lewistown 48 miles (77 km) to Galesburg. IL 97 leads east out of Lewistown concurrently with US 24, then turns south, leading 12 miles (19 km) to Havana and 60 miles (97 km) to Springfield, the state capital.

According to the 2010 census, Lewistown has a total area of 2 square miles (5.18 km2), all land.[8]

Tourist attractions[edit]

Oak Hill Cemetery is located in Lewistown. This cemetery was made famous by Edgar Lee Masters in his Spoon River Anthology.

The Emiquon National Wildlife Refuge, a 7,000 acres (30 km2) wetland restoration, is located on the Illinois River 6 miles (10 km) east of Lewistown. It is one of the largest floodplain restoration projects in the United States outside the Florida Everglades.

Dickson Mounds Museum, 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Lewistown, is an archaeological museum dedicated to American Indian artifacts. It is one of the major archaeological museums in the United States.

The Rasmussen Blacksmith Shop Museum is located on Main Street of Lewistown. It is one of the few blacksmith shops left in the United States. It has been run by the Rasmussen family since 1880.

The Spoon River Valley Scenic Drive is an event sponsored by the city of Lewistown in the fall of each year. It includes a plethora of shops and stands that sell a variety of products.

Lewistown Music in the Park is held every Thursday night 7-9pm for 10 weeks during the summer in Porter Park at the gazebo. Music in the Park features local talent, and admission is free.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,771
1890 2,166 22.3%
1900 2,504 15.6%
1910 2,312 −7.7%
1920 2,279 −1.4%
1930 2,249 −1.3%
1940 2,355 4.7%
1950 2,630 11.7%
1960 2,603 −1.0%
1970 2,706 4.0%
1980 2,758 1.9%
1990 2,572 −6.7%
2000 2,522 −1.9%
2010 2,384 −5.5%
Est. 2015 2,261 [9] −5.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]

As of the census[11] of 2000, there were 2,522 people, 1,092 households, and 661 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,372.2 people per square mile (529.2/km²). There were 1,182 housing units at an average density of 643.1 per square mile (248.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 98.93% White, 0.08% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 0.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.07% of the population.

There were 1,092 households out of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.4% were non-families. 36.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the city the population was spread out with 21.6% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 20.9% from 45 to 64, and 24.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 88.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,943, and the median income for a family was $40,431. Males had a median income of $31,979 versus $19,569 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,620. About 4.8% of families and 7.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.9% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chas. C. Chapman & Co. 1879. History of Fulton County, Illinois. Peoria: C.C. Chapman & Co.
  2. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Lewistown city, Illinois". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved May 13, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 186. 
  5. ^ "Fulton County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 16 June 2015. 
  6. ^ Mavicliano, George H., and Richard A. Lawson, The Federal Art Project in Illinois: 1935-1943. Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale (1990), p.167
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  8. ^ "G001 - Geographic Identifiers - 2010 Census Summary File 1". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 11, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  12. ^ 'Illinois Blue Book 1953-1954,' Biographical Sketch of Reed F. Cutler, pg. 268

External links[edit]