Lia (artist)

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Lia is an Austrian software artist. Her work includes the early Net Art sites re-move.org and turux.at. In 2003 she co-curated the Abstraction Now exhibition (Internet Projects and Medialounge) at the Künstlerhaus Wien in Vienna, Austria.[1] In 2003 Lia received an Award of Distinction in the Net Vision/Net Excellence Category for re-move.org.[2]

In the 1990s and early 2000s, she and her collaborators at Turux employed software normally used for multimedia CD-ROMs and Web page enhancements, notably Macromedia Director, to create animated abstract images, which "demonstrates the raw visual horsepower of these tools when they’re not yoked to some mundane purpose."[3] Her early work has been highlighted in histories of computer and digital art,[4] particularly for its use of novel forms of interactivity.[5]

Lia subsequently developed and released interactive generative art pieces as iOS apps,[6] and has discussed the ways in which her construction of digital art has evolved with changes in screen resolution.[7] She has extensively used the programming language Processing,[8][9] which is designed for visual design and software art.

She is one of the founding members of Crónica, a "media-label" publishing and distribution project for electronic art and cultural artifacts.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Abstraction Now! - introduction". Abstraction-now.at. Retrieved 2010-05-22. 
  2. ^ Austria (2010-04-20). "PRIXARS International Competition for CyberArts". ARS Electronica. Retrieved 2010-05-22. 
  3. ^ Blais, Joline; Jon Ippolito (2006). At the Edge of Art. Thames & Hudson. pp. See Fig. 3. ISBN 0-500-23822-7. 
  4. ^ Mealing, Stuart (1997). Computers and art (1st ed.). Oxford: Intellect. ISBN 9781871516609. 
  5. ^ Corby, edited by Tom (2006). Network art : practices and positions. Hoboken: Taylor and Francis. pp. 32–33. ISBN 9781136578052. 
  6. ^ Sterling, Bruce (2010-05-23). "Showtime: Turux by Lia, 1997-2001". Beyond The Beyond. Wired. Retrieved 2012-01-28. 
  7. ^ Holmes, Kevin. "Software Art Inspired By Human Relationships And Amethyst Mines". The Creators Project. Vice. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 
  8. ^ "Multimedia Pick of the Week". Alpha-Ville. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 
  9. ^ "Prosthetic Knowledge Picks: The Artist and 3D Printer". Prosthetic Knowledge. Rhizome. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 
  10. ^ "About Crónica". Crónica. Retrieved 2 May 2015. 

External links[edit]