Liam Aiken

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Liam Aiken
Liamaiken.jpg
Born Liam Pádraic Aiken[1]
(1990-01-07) January 7, 1990 (age 28)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1997–present

Liam Pádraic Aiken (born January 7, 1990) is an American actor. He has starred in films such as Stepmom (1998), Road to Perdition (2002), and Good Boy! (2003), and played Klaus Baudelaire in Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004), based on the series of books.

Early life[edit]

Aiken was born in New York City, New York, the only child of an Irish-born mother, Moya Aiken, and Bill Aiken, an MTV producer.[2] Bill died of cancer in October 1992, at age 34, when Liam was two years old. Aiken attended Dwight-Englewood School, graduating in 2008. He then went on to major in film at New York University.[3]

Career[edit]

Aiken made his professional acting debut in a Ford Motor Company commercial. He made his stage debut in the Broadway play A Doll's House at the age of seven, and his film debut in Henry Fool (1997). His first major film role came when he starred in Stepmom (1998). He appeared in Road to Perdition (2002) and the family film Good Boy! (2003). He turned down the role of Cole Sear in The Sixth Sense (1999) because his mother felt he was too young for the death-fixated role.[citation needed] He was also considered for the role of Harry Potter as he had previously worked with director Chris Columbus on Stepmom.[4] However, as he is not British,[5] Daniel Radcliffe took the part.

Aiken went on to play intelligent 12-year-old orphan Klaus Baudelaire in Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004). He also appeared in The Killer Inside Me (2010). In September 2011, he appeared in the CBS series A Gifted Man. From 2012 to 2015, he narrated the audiobook versions of All the Wrong Questions, a prequel series to A Series of Unfortunate Events.

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1997 Henry Fool Ned
1998 Montana Kid
1998 The Object of My Affection Nathan
1998 Stepmom Ben Harrison
2000 I Dreamed of Africa Emanuele Gallmann (age 7)
2001 Sweet November Abner
2001 The Rising Place Emmett Wilder
2002 Road to Perdition Peter Sullivan
2003 Good Boy! Owen Baker
2004 Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events Klaus Baudelaire
2006 Fay Grim Ned Grim
2010 The Killer Inside Me Johnnie Pappas
2012 Electrick Children Mr. Will
2012 Girls Against Boys Tyler
2012 Munchausen Son Short film
2013 How to Be a Man Bryan
2014 Ned Rifle Ned
2015 The Frontier Eddie
2015 Weepah Way for Now Reed
2015 Let Me Down Easy Hezekiah Short film
2017 The Emoji Movie Ronnie Ram Tech

Television[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1998 Law & Order Jack Ericson Episode: "Disappeared"
2002 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Robbie Bishop Episode: "Bright Boy"
2007 Law & Order Tory Quinlann Episode: "Captive"
2009 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Jason Episode: "Salome in Manhattan"
2011 A Gifted Man Milo 2 episodes
2013 Mad Men Rolo Episode: "The Quality of Mercy"

Stage[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
1997 A Doll's House Bobby Helmer Belasco Theatre

Video games[edit]

Year Title Role Notes
2004 Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events Klaus Baudelaire Voice

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Result Work
1999 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a Feature Film - Young Actor Age Ten or Younger Won Stepmom
2003 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a Feature Film - Supporting Young Actor Nominated Road to Perdition
2004 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a Feature Film - Leading Young Actor Nominated Good Boy!
2005 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a Feature Film - Leading Young Actor Nominated Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events
2005 Critics Choice Award Best Young Actor Nominated Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff, Variety (October 13, 1992). "Bill Aiken". 
  2. ^ Hill, Logan. "Unfortunate Son". New York. 
  3. ^ Ja, Irene (September 2, 2008). "Famous faces join campus". Washington Square News. Archived from the original on December 3, 2008. Retrieved October 22, 2008. 
  4. ^ Guardian UK (accessed June 24, 2007)
  5. ^ "BBC News - ENTERTAINMENT - Python joins Potter cast". news.bbc.co.uk. 

External links[edit]