Liam Redmond

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Liam Redmond
Actor Liam Redmond.jpg
Born (1913-07-27)27 July 1913
Limerick, County Limerick, Ireland
Died 28 October 1989(1989-10-28) (aged 76)
Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland
Occupation Actor
Years active 1935–1970s
Spouse(s) Barbara MacDonagh (m. 1936; d. 1987)
Children 4

Liam Redmond (27 July 1913 – 28 October 1989) was an Irish actor known for his stage, film and television roles.[1]

Early life[edit]

Redmond was one of four children born to cabinet-maker Thomas and Eileen Redmond. Educated at the Christian Brothers schools in Dublin, he later attended at University College, Dublin and initially read medicine before moving into drama.[2]

Acting career[edit]

While Director of the Dramatic Society he met and married the society's secretary Barbara MacDonagh (sister of Donagh MacDonagh and daughter of 1916 Rising leader Thomas MacDonagh). They had four children.[2]

Redmond was invited to join the Abbey Theatre in 1935 as a producer by William Butler Yeats, the Irish poet. Yeats wrote his play Death of Cuchullain for Redmond to star as Cúchullain, hero of one of Ireland's foundational myths.

Redmond made his acting debut at the Abbey Theatre in 1935 in Seán O'Casey's The Silver Tassie.[3] His first stage appearance was in 1939 in New York in The White Steed. After returning to Britain at the outbreak of the Second World War he was a regular on the London stage. He was one of the founders of WAAMA, the Writers', Artists', Actors' and Musicians' Association, a precursor of Irish Actors' Equity. His insistence that "part-time professionals" – usually civil servants who acted on the side – should be paid a higher rate than professional actors for both rehearsal time and performance, effectively wiped out this class, raising the wages and fees of working actors.

He starred in Broadway, among other plays starring in Paul Vincent Carroll's 1939 The White Steed; in 1955 playing Canon McCooey in The Wayward Saint winning the George Jean Nathan Award for his performance, and in 1968 starring in Joe Orton's Loot and Brian Friel's The Loves of Cass Maguire.[4]

Redmond worked in TV and film throughout the 1950s to the 1980s and was regularly seen in TV series such as The Avengers, Daniel Boone, The Saint and Z-Cars.[5] He was often called upon as a character actor in various military, religious and judicial roles in films such as I See a Dark Stranger (1946), Captain Boycott (1947), High Treason (1951), The Cruel Sea (1953), Playboy of the Western World (1962), Kid Galahad (1962), The Luck of Ginger Coffey (1964), Tobruk (1967), The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966) and Barry Lyndon (1975).[6] His performance as the kindly occult expert in the cult horror film Night of the Demon (1957) is a favourite of fans of the film.

Redmond retired to Dublin and died aged 76 after a long period of ill health in 1989. His wife Barbara predeceased him in 1987.[2]

Selected Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Connolly, Earl (23 March 1960). "Famous Limerick Actor in Sea Drama" (PDF). Limerick Leader. 
  2. ^ a b c Slater, Sharon (9 January 2013). "Who Was Liam Redmond?". Limerick's Life. 
  3. ^ Liam Redmond at AllMovie
  4. ^ Liam Redmond at the Internet Broadway Database
  5. ^ "Liam Redmond Credits". TV.com. CBS Interactive. 
  6. ^ "Liam Redmond Filmography". British Film Institute. Retrieved 24 July 2016. 

External links[edit]