Liam Scarlett

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Liam Scarlett
Born 1985/1986 (age 31–32)[1]
Ipswich, England
Nationality British
Education Royal Ballet School
Occupation choreographer

Liam Scarlett (born 1985/86) is a British choreographer who is artist in residence with The Royal Ballet and artistic associate with Queensland Ballet[2]. He has also choreographed new works for Miami City Ballet, Norwegian National Ballet, the BalletBoyz, English National Ballet, San Francisco Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Royal New Zealand Ballet and The Royal Ballet School.

Early life[edit]

Scarlett was born in Ipswich, and started dancing aged four.[1] He trained at the Linda Shipton School of Dancing, followed by The Royal Ballet Lower School, which he entered at the age of eight,[3] and then the Upper School.[4]

Choreographer[edit]

His first work for the main stage at Covent Garden was Asphodel Meadows in 2010. It was a work for 20 dancers set to Poulenc's Concerto for Two Pianos.[5] In 2008 the work was commissioned by the Royal Ballet's then director, Monica Mason, who was eager to develop his choreographic abilities.[3]

Scarlett is the youngest choreographer to have a full-length ballet commissioned by the Royal Ballet.[6]

Edward Villella, the then director of Miami City Ballet, saw the dress rehearsal and commissioned Scarlett there and then. Viscera's critically acclaimed premiere took place in January 2012.[5] As well as further work for the Royal Ballet and Miami City Ballet, Scarlett has created new works for the Norwegian National Ballet, the BalletBoyz, English National Ballet, the San Francisco Ballet and American Ballet Theatre.[5]

In November 2012, aged 26, Scarlett gave up his dancing career as a first artist with The Royal Ballet, to become their first Artist in Residence, a post created especially for him by the Ballet's director, Kevin O'Hare.[1][4]

On 29 April 2014, Scarlett's Hummingbird, inspired by Philip Glass's Tirol Concerto for Piano and Orchestra premiered at the San Francisco Ballet.[3] In its review, theartsdesk critic thought that it stood "above offerings from Wheeldon, Morris and Liang", and that Scarlett created "a fabulous, compelling visual and emotional world ... stirring stuff, and beautiful."[7]

Works[edit]

All for the Royal Ballet, unless otherwise noted:

  • Few Things Are (2005)
  • Despite (2006)
  • Vayamos al Diablo (2006)
  • Hinterland (2006) (Ballet Black)
  • Indigo Children (2007) (Ballet Black)
  • Of Mozart (2008)
  • Consolations and Liebestraum (2009)
  • Asphodel Meadows (2010)
  • Viscera (2012) (Miami City Ballet)
  • Sweet Violets (2012)
  • Diana and Acteon in Metamorphosis: Titian (2012)
  • Euphotic (2013) (Miami City Ballet)
  • Hansel and Gretel (2013)
  • Promenade Sentimentale (2013) (K-Ballet)
  • Serpent (2013) (BalletBoyz: The Talent)
  • Firebird (2013) (Norwegian National Ballet)
  • Vespertine (2013) (Norwegian National Ballet)
  • The Age of Anxiety (2014)
  • Hummingbird (2014) (San Francisco Ballet)
  • No Man's Land (2014) (English National Ballet)
  • Acheron (2014) (New York City Ballet)
  • With a Chance of Rain (2014) (American Ballet Theatre)
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream (2015) (Royal New Zealand Ballet and Queensland Ballet)
  • Carmen (2015) (Norwegian National Ballet)
  • Frankenstein (2016)
  • Symphonic Dances (2017)
  • Swan Lake (2018)

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Duchen, Jessica (11 December 2012). "Liam Scarlett: Dance's hottest property". The Independent. Retrieved 28 August 2014. 
  2. ^ "Liam Scarlett - Artistic Associate". Queensland Ballet. Queensland Ballet. Retrieved 31 March 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c Hunt, Mary Ellen (28 April 2014). "Liam Scarlett's smooth leap from corps to choreography". SFGate. Retrieved 31 August 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Liam Scarlett, Choreographer". Royal Opera House. Retrieved 24 August 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c Sulkas, Roislyn (26 January 2014). "Hot Hand: Liam Scarlett Creates a Work for City Ballet". The New York Times. Retrieved 30 August 2014. 
  6. ^ "2017 Repertory Season: Frankenstein: San Francisco Ballet". sfballet.org. Retrieved 10 September 2016. 
  7. ^ Weibye, Hanna (24 January 2014). "theartsdesk in Paris: San Francisco Ballet 2". The Arts Desk. Retrieved 31 August 2014. 
  8. ^ Colombus, Katie. "The rise and rise of Liam Scarlett: En pointe". The Stage. Retrieved 28 August 2014.