Libby Copeland

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Elizabeth Copeland
Born 1976
Nationality American
Alma mater University of Pennsylvania
Occupation Freelance journalist

Libby Copeland (born 1976) is a freelance writer in New York, and was previously a staff writer for the Washington Post. She started her career with the Post in 1998 as an intern in the style department,[1] and went on to cover culture, crime and Washington politics.[2][3] In 2005, she was the Feature Specialty Reporting winner for the large circulation papers in the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors' annual competition.[4] In 2009, she left the Post and moved to New York. Since becoming a freelancer, she has become a regular contributor to Slate, and has written for the New York magazine, the Wall Street Journal and Cosmopolitan, among other publications. She has appeared on MSNBC, CNN and NPR.

Early life and education[edit]

Copeland was born in 1976. She is an alumna of Hastings High School of Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. She went on to major in English at the University of Pennsylvania where she won the Thouron Award in her junior year.[5]

Career[edit]

Copeland's freelance work has included a number of pieces on gender and politics for Slate,[6] a piece on product placement for New York,[7] and for Cosmo, an in-depth recounting of a gruesome murder in a D.C.-area lululemon store.

For Style, the daily features section of the Washington Post, Copeland covered the 2005 Michael Jackson molestation trial, the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, and the 2008 presidential election. Copeland wrote primarily about the McCain and Edwards campaigns during the 2008 election, and profiled political figures including Joe and Jill Biden and Cindy and Meghan McCain. Her coverage of the 2006 Congressional mid-term elections has also been both lauded [8][9] and enthusiastically criticized [10] by the blogging community, and Wonkette called one of her pieces "fawning."[11] She wrote articles for the Washington Post about Washington, D.C. area graffiti artist Borf and has been the subject of some graffiti saying "Libby Copeland Writes Lies," possibly in connection with the Borf issue.[12] During the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy, she wrote about figure skater Johnny Weir's free-wheeling shopping habits.[13] In 2003, she wrote about modern-day Jersey "dandys" bent on reclaiming the slur "guido," prompting some controversy.[citation needed] She profiled Matt Damon,[14] and skewered the popular girls' retailer Club Libby Lu.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1998 Intern Bios". Washington Post. 1998. Archived from the original on March 13, 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
  2. ^ "Libby Is The New Leibovich". Fishbowl DC. Mediabistro.com. March 28, 2006. Archived from the original on November 6, 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
  3. ^ Jaffe, Harry (2004). "Buyouts Give Young Reporters Room to Shine". Washingtonian. Archived from the original on May 12, 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
  4. ^ "2005 Contest Winners". American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors. Archived from the original on October 6, 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
  5. ^ "Winner of Thouron Award Libby Copeland". University of Pennsylvania. Retrieved November 30, 2006. [dead link]
  6. ^ "Authors: Libby Copeland". Slate. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  7. ^ Copeland, Libby (September 30, 2012). "The Björn Supremacy". New York. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Katherine Harris is going down in". Icantbelieveitsnotademocracy.blogs.com. October 31, 2006. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  9. ^ O'Brien, Barbara (October 19, 2006). "Righties Can’t Read". Mahablog.com. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  10. ^ Rosenberg, John (January 13, 2006). "Elitist Snootiness in the Washington Post". Thatliberalmedia.com. Archived from the original on November 19, 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
  11. ^ Carpentier, Megan (December 5, 2007). "Kucinich Loves His Hot Wife". Wonkette.com. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  12. ^ "Getting Libby With It". Fishbowl DC. Mediabistro.com. October 19, 2007. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved November 30, 2006. 
  13. ^ Copeland, Libby (February 22, 2006). "Drop Till You Shop". Washington Post. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  14. ^ Copeland, Libby (July 19, 2004). "The Two Faces Of Matt". Washington Post. Retrieved June 23, 2015. 
  15. ^ Copeland, Libby (March 25, 2006). "Glamour Babes". Washington Post. Retrieved June 23, 2015.