Libertad (coin)

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Silver Libertad
Mexico
Mass31.1 g (1.0 troy oz)
Diameter40 mm (1.58 in)
Thickness3.0 mm (0.12 in)
EdgeReeded
Composition99.9% Ag
Years of minting1982-present
Obverse
Mexican Libertad silver coin obverse.png
DesignCoat of arms of Mexico with 10 past versions of this symbol surrounding it.
Mexican Libertad silver coin obverse 1982-1999.png
Design1982-1999 version showing the coat of arms of Mexico
Reverse
Mexican Libertad silver coin reverse.png
DesignThree-quarter side view of the Angel of Independence with the volcanoes Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl in the background
Mexican Libertad silver coin reverse 1982-1999.png
Design1982-1995 version showing frontal view of the Angel of Independence with the volcanoes Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl

The Libertad coins are silver and gold bullion coins originating from Mexico and minted by the La Casa de Moneda de México (Mexican Mint). The Mexican Mint was established in 1535 and is the oldest mint in the Americas. The modern coins contain 99.9% silver or gold (.999 fineness) and are available in various sizes. Both metal coins have undergone a design change. In 1989, 3,500 14 ounce Libertad platinum coins were produced. Libertads are devoid of face value, yet are still accepted as currency and guaranteed by Banco de México based on the market value of its gold or silver content.

In addition to the bullion version, a proof and reverse proof versions for both metals are manufactured specifically for collectors. Proof coins contain a frosted angel with a polished background. A reverse proof is the opposite and has a polished angel with a frosted background. An antique finish is available in silver and is also sought out by collectors. An antique finish gives coins an aged appearance without any loss of detail. The antiqued finish usually displays portions that look as if they have toned darker. Proof and antique finish coins are minted in relatively small quantities and are considered more beautiful and valuable than the standard bullion coin.

Design[edit]

Obverse: The Coat of arms of Mexico is shown with a Mexican golden eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus devouring a rattlesnake. This imagery relates to the founding of Tenochtitlan, present-day Mexico City. The coat of arms is rooted in the legend where the god Huitzilopochtli told the Aztec people where to build their city where they saw an eagle eating a snake on top of a cactus.[1] The bottom half of the coat of arms has oak and laurel leaves encircling the eagle. The top half has the words Estados Unidos Mexicanos (United Mexican States) encircling the eagle. The gold obverse has not changed since its inception and the silver coin had the same obverse at its inception. In 2000, the silver obverse was changed to depict the current Mexican national coat of arms along with 10 past versions of this symbol surrounding it. The Spanish inscription ESTADOS UNIDOS MEXICANOS still surrounds the central coat of arms.[2] The past version of the symbol at the top is found in the Codex Mendoza from 1524.

Reverse: The design used was based on the 1921 gold Centenario, a coin issued to mark the centennial of Mexican independence. The winged Victoria of Angel of Independence is in front with the volcanoes Popocatépetl and Iztaccihuatl in the background. The weight (ONZA or ounce), date, and purity are also listed. The older Libertad coins show a front-facing view of the angel. The new Libertad series shows a three-quarter side profile of the angel. The gold used the older angel from 1981 through 1999. The silver used the older angel from 1982 through 1995.[2]

Specifications[edit]

Gold coins have not changed sizes since first minted. From 1982 through 1995, the one, 12, and 14 ounce silver coins had slightly smaller diameters and greater thicknesses than current minted coins. From 1981 through 1990, the gold coins contained 90% gold (.90 fineness). The gold coins since 1991 and all silver coins have contained 99.9% silver or gold. (.999 fineness).[3][4]

Current specifications[3][5]
Composition Weight
(troy oz)
Weight
(grams)
Diameter
(mm)
Thickness
(mm)
Silver 32.15 1000 110 11.5
5 155.5 65 5.4
2 62.2 48 4.5
1 31.1 40 3.0
12 15.56 33 2.35
14 7.8 27 1.7
110 3.11 20 1.4
120 1.56 16 1.0
Gold 1 31.1 34.5 2.5
12 15.56 29 1.8
14 7.8 23 1.3
110 3.1 16 1.3
120 1.56 13 .65

Silver mintage[edit]

Mintage of silver uncirculated coins[6][7]
Libertad Silver BU Mintages 2021.pdf
File:Seal of the Government of Mexico.svg

Silver proof mintage (p) Proof; (rp) Reverse proof; (af) Antique finish[edit]

Mintage of silver proof coinage[8][7][9]
Libertad Silver Proof Mintages 2021.pdf
File:Mexican Libertad silver coin reverse proof.png
File:Mexican Libertad silver coin antique.png

Gold mintage[edit]

Gold Libertad
Mexico
Mass31.1 g (1.0 troy oz)
Diameter34.5 mm (1.36 in)
Thickness2.5 mm (0.099 in)
Composition99.9% Au
Years of minting1981-present
Obverse
Mexican Libertad gold coin obverse.png
DesignCoat of arms of Mexico
Reverse
Mexican Libertad gold coin reverse.png
DesignThree-quarter side view of the Angel of Independence with the volcanoes Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl in the background
Mintage of gold uncirculated coins[6][7][10]
Libertad Gold Uncirculated Mintages 2021.pdf

Gold proof mintage (p) Proof; (rp) Reverse proof[edit]

Mintage of gold proof coinage[6][7][10]
Libertad Gold Proof Mintages 2021.pdf

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Minahan, James B. (2009). The Complete Guide to National Symbols and Emblems. ABC-CLIO. p. 718. ISBN 9780313344978. Archived from the original on 2021-10-17. Retrieved 2020-09-30.
  2. ^ a b "Libertad Design is Not Likely to Change". Coin Week. 30 October 2018. Archived from the original on 25 February 2020. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Currency" (in Spanish). Government of Mexico. Archived from the original on 10 March 2017. Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  4. ^ "Libertad series silver" (in Spanish). Bank of Mexico. Archived from the original on 25 February 2020. Retrieved 26 February 2020.
  5. ^ "Mexican Silver "Libertad"". Goldadvert. 27 December 2018. Archived from the original on 25 February 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2020.
  6. ^ a b c 2020 Standard Catalog of World Coins - 1901–2000 (47th ed.). Krause Publications. 2019. ISBN 978-1-4402-4896-2.
  7. ^ a b c d 2020 Standard Catalog of World Coins - 2001–Date (14th ed.). Krause Publications. 2019. ISBN 978-1-4402-4897-9.
  8. ^ "Silver coins" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 5 December 2013. Retrieved 25 December 2010..
  9. ^ Golino, Louis (12 March 2019). "Libertad Coin Series 2019 Programs Surprises". Coin Update. Archived from the original on 14 March 2019. Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  10. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-04-02. Retrieved 2015-03-29.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

Banxico, banco central, Banco de México