Libertadores

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This article is about the historical figures. For the South American football competition, see Copa Libertadores.
For other uses, see Libertador.
The Guayaquil conference(1822) between Simón Bolívar and José de San Martín, the greatest libertadores (liberators) of Spanish America.

Libertadores (Spanish: [liβertaˈðoɾes], Portuguese: [libeʁtaˈdoɾis], "Liberators") refers to the principal leaders of the Latin American wars of independence from Spain and Portugal. They are named that way in contrast with the Conquistadors, who were so far the only Spanish/Portuguese peoples recorded in the South American history.[1]

They were largely bourgeois, criollos (local-born people of European, mostly of Spanish or Portuguese, ancestry) influenced by liberalism and in most cases with military training in the metropole (mother country).

List of libertadores[edit]

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Contributed to the independence of Took part in Refs
Miguel Hidalgo.jpg Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla
(1753-1811)
Mexico Grito de Dolores
Mexican War of Independence
[2]
Smartin.JPG José de San Martín
(1778-1850)
Argentina, Chile and Peru Argentine War of Independence
Crossing of the Andes
Chilean War of Independence
Peruvian War of Independence
[3]
Bolivar Arturo Michelena.jpg Simón Bolívar
(1783-1830)
Colombia, Panama, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia Venezuelan War of Independence
Admirable Campaign
Patria Boba
Ecuadorian War of Independence
Peruvian War of Independence
Bolivian War of Independence
[4]
Mexico.JoseMariaMorelos.01.jpg José María Morelos
(1765-1815)
Mexico Mexican War of Independence
wrote the Sentimientos de la Nación
[5]
RamonCastilla.jpg Ramón Castilla
(1797-1867)
Peru Peruvian War of Independence [6]
Andréssantacruz2.jpg Andrés de Santa Cruz
(1764-1850)
Bolivia and Peru Bolivian War of Independence
Argentine War of Independence
Peruvian War of Independence
Ecuadorian War of Independence
War of the Confederation
[6]
Juan Manuel Blanes - Artigas en la Ciudadela.jpg José Gervasio Artigas
(1764-1850)
Uruguay British invasions of the River Plate
Portuguese invasion of the Banda Oriental
Portuguese conquest of the Banda Oriental
Argentine Civil Wars
[6]
Manuelbelgrano.jpg Manuel Belgrano
(1770-1820)
Paraguay, Argentina and Bolivia British invasions of the River Plate
May Revolution
Paraguay campaign
Argentine War of Independence
Bolivian War of Independence
[7]
Lord Cochrane(2).jpg Thomas Cochrane
(1775-1860)
Brazil, Chile French Revolutionary Wars
Napoleonic Wars
Chilean War of Independence
Peruvian War of Independence
Brazilian War of Independence
Greek War of Independence
[8]
Iturbide Emperador by Josephus Arias Huerta.jpg Augustin I of Mexico
(1783-1824)
Mexico Mexican War of Independence
design of the Plan de Iguala
[8]
Francisco de Miranda by Lewis B. Adams.jpg Francisco de Miranda
(1750-1816)
Venezuela American Revolutionary War
French Revolution
Venezuelan War of Independence
[9]
Mariano Moreno en su mesa de trabajo.jpg Mariano Moreno
(1778-1811)
Argentina Argentine War of Independence
Paraguay campaign
[10]
Ohiggins.jpg Bernardo O'Higgins
(1778-1842)
Chile and Peru Chilean War of Independence
Argentine War of Independence
Peruvian War of Independence
[11][12]
Portrait of Dom Pedro, Duke of Bragança - Google Art Project edit.jpg Pedro I of Brazil
(1798-1834)
Brazil War of Independence of Brazil
Cisplatine War
Liberal Wars
[13]
Gran marical de ayacucho.jpg Antonio José de Sucre
(1795-1830)
Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Venezuela Venezuelan War of Independence
Ecuadorian War of Independence
Bolivian War of Independence
Peruvian War of Independence
Gran Colombia–Peru War
[14]
Jose bonifacio de andrada.png José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva
(1763-1838)
Brazil

Legacy[edit]

The flags of Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador follow Francisco de Miranda's design of 1806. Also, Bolivia was named after Bolivar, who in turn was president of Colombia, Bolivia and twice of Venezuela. San Martín served as "President Protector" of Peru.

Liberators' names were used all over South America to name anything from towns and places to institutions and sports clubs. Also, the most prestigious international club football competition in South America is named the Copa Libertadores in their honour.

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Robert Harvey. Liberators: Latin America's Struggle for Independence. Woodstock, The Overlook Press, 2000. ISBN 1-58567-072-3
  • James Higgins (editor). The Emancipation of Peru: British Eyewitness Accounts, 2014. Online at https://sites.google.com/site/jhemanperu
  • Marion Lansing. Liberators and Heroes of South America. Boston, L. C. Page & Co., 1940.
  • Irene Nicholson. The Liberators: A Study of Independence Movements in Spanish America. New York, Frederick A. Praeger, 1968.
  • Pigna, Felipe (2010). Libertadores de América. Buenos Aires: Planeta. ISBN 978-950-49-2420-3. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pigna, p. 9
  2. ^ Lansing, pp. 15-39
  3. ^ Pigna, pp. 195-272
  4. ^ Pigna, pp. 135-192
  5. ^ Lansing, pp. 39-59
  6. ^ a b c Lansing, p. 121
  7. ^ Pigna, p. 55-91
  8. ^ a b Robert Harvey. Liberators: Latin America's Struggle for Independence. Woodstock, The Overlook Press, 2000. ISBN 1-58567-072-3
  9. ^ Pigna, pp. 13-52
  10. ^ Lansing, pp. 119
  11. ^ page 429 Robert Harvey. Liberators: Latin America's Struggle for Independence. Woodstock, The Overlook Press, 2000. ISBN 1-58567-072-3
  12. ^ Pigna, pp. 93-133
  13. ^ page 511, Robert Harvey. Liberators: Latin America's Struggle for Independence. Woodstock, The Overlook Press, 2000. ISBN 1-58567-072-3
  14. ^ Lansing, pp. 219

External links[edit]

Copa Libertadores