Libertarian Party of Canada

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Libertarian Party of Canada
Parti libertarien du Canada
Active federal party
Leader Tim Moen[1]
President Nichole Adams [2]
Founded 1973
Headquarters 372 Rideau St., Suite 205
Ottawa, Ontario[1][3]
Ideology Libertarianism, classical liberalism, voluntaryism, non-interventionism
Political position Socially left-wing, fiscally right-wing
International affiliation InterLibertarians
Colours Yellow / Indigo
Fiscal policy Fiscal conservatism, laissez-faire
Social policy Civil libertarianism
Seats in the House of Commons
0 / 338
Seats in the Senate
0 / 105
Website
Official website
Politics of Canada
Political parties
Elections

The Libertarian Party of Canada is a political party in Canada, founded in 1973. The party subscribes to socially progressive and economically right wing tenets of the libertarian movement across Canada. Some policies the party advocates for are; ending Prohibition of drugs, lowering taxes, protecting gun rights and non-interventionism.[4]

History[edit]

The party was founded on July 7, 1973 by Bruce Evoy[citation needed], who became its first chairman, and seven others. Evoy ran for election to Parliament in the 1974 federal election in the Toronto riding of Rosedale. The party achieved registered status in the 1979 federal election by running more than fifty candidates.

The party described itself as Canada's "fourth party" in the 1980s[citation needed], but it has since been displaced by new parties such as the Bloc Québécois and the Green Party of Canada. The party declined to join the Reform Party of Canada when it was formed in 1987[citation needed]. Many libertarians were also attracted to provincial Progressive Conservative parties that moved to the right during the 1990s in Ontario under Mike Harris, and in Alberta under Ralph Klein.

The decline in the party's membership and resources resulted in Elections Canada removing their status as a registered party immediately before the 1997 federal election when the party failed to run the minimum fifty candidates needed to maintain its registration.[citation needed]

Jean-Serge Brisson led the party from May 22, 2000 until May 18, 2008 when he was succeeded by Dennis Young. Young defeated outgoing party president Alan Mercer for the leadership. Savannah Linklater was elected deputy leader.[5]

In May 2011, Katrina Chowne was elected leader of the Libertarian Party.

In May 2014, Tim Moen was elected leader of the Libertarian Party.

In the 2015 federal election, the party fielded 72 candidates and solidified their position as the 6th federal party in Canada. With growth over 500% from the 2011 elections, the party is the fastest growing party.

Election results[edit]

Election # of candidates # of votes % of popular vote % in ridings contested
1979 60 16,042 0.134% 0.576%
1980 58 14,656 0.134% 0.576%
1984 72 23,514 0.187% 0.705%
1988 88 33,185 0.252% 0.754%
1993 52 14,630 0.118% 0.580%
1997 * * *
2000 * * *
2004 8 1,949 0.015% 0.518%
2006 10 3,002 0.02% 0.57%
2008 26 7,300 0.053% 0.567%
2011 23 6,017 0.04% 0.498%
2015 72[6] 37,407[7][8] 0.21% Pending

The party also nominated a number of candidates to run in by-elections:

  • 1980 by-election: 1
  • 1981 by-election: 1
  • 1982 by-election: 1
  • 1990 by-election: 2
  • 1995 by-election: 1
  • 2008 by-election: 1
  • 2010 by-election: 1
  • 2012 by-election: 3
  • 2013 by-election: 3
  • 2014 by-election: 2

Sources: 1974: Libertarian Party of Canada News, July/August 1974, 4. 1979-2006: Parliament of Canada History of the Federal Electoral Ridings since 1867

Leaders[edit]

George Dance

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b [1]
  2. ^ http://www.libertarian.ca/leadership/
  3. ^ "Elections Canada". Elections.ca. Retrieved November 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ . 2015-06-06 http://ipolitics.ca/2015/05/06/canadas-own-rand-paul-libertarian-party-amps-up-for-election/. Retrieved 2015-10-19.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ "Western Standard". Westernstandard.blogs.com. 2008-05-20. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 
  6. ^ http://www.elections.ca/content2.aspx?section=can&dir=cand/lst&document=index&lang=e Elections Canada, List of Confirmed Candidates
  7. ^ http://enr.elections.ca/National.aspx?lang=e Elections Canada, 2015 Results (unofficial)
  8. ^ http://www.cbc.ca/includes/federalelection/dashboard/index.html
  9. ^ Libertarian Party of Canada, "Leadership Roles", Party File, ParlInfo, parl.gc.ca. Web, Dec. 7, 2010. http://www2.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/files/Party.aspx?Item=2ef41a44-7f48-4b22-a342-781e589f8ed1&Language=E
  10. ^ "Agenda". Libertarian.ca. Retrieved 2010-08-13. 

Further reading[edit]

Archival holdings[edit]

External links[edit]