2017 Liechtenstein general election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
2017 Liechtenstein general election

← 2013 5 February 2017 2021 →

All 25 seats of the Landtag
13 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party
  Adrian Hasler 01 (cropped 2).jpg Thomas Zwiefelhofer 01 (cropped).jpg
Leader Adrian Hasler Thomas Zwiefelhofer
Party FBP VU
Leader since 2013 2013
Last election 10 seats, 40.0% 8 seats, 33.5%
Seats won 9 8
Seat change Decrease1 Steady
Popular vote 68,673 65,742
Percentage 35.2 33.7
Swing Decrease4.8pp Increase0.2pp

  Third party Fourth party
 
DU
FL
Leader Harry Quaderer Derya Kesci & Pepo Frick
Party DU FL
Leader since 2013 2013
Last election 4 seats, 15.3% 3 seats, 11.1%
Seats won 5 3
Seat change Increase1 Steady
Popular vote 35,885 24,595
Percentage 18.4 12.6
Swing Increase3.1pp Increase1.5pp

2017 Liechtenstein general election - Results by constituency.svg
Popular vote and seat totals by constituency. As this is a PR election, seat totals are determined by popular vote in each constituency.

Prime Minister before election

Adrian Hasler
FBP

Elected Prime Minister

Adrian Hasler
FBP

Coat of arms of Liechtenstein.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Liechtenstein

General elections took place in Liechtenstein on 5 February 2017.[1]

Background[edit]

The previous elections in 2013 saw the Patriotic Union lose five seats and their majority in the Landtag. The Progressive Citizens' Party also lost a seat, but became the governing party in part due to the entry of The Independents, a new party that won four seats.

The 2013 elections marked the first time that four parties had won seats in the Landtag,[2] with suggestions that protest voting against austerity policies or reduced partisanship amongst voters may have been factors.[2][3][4]

Electoral system[edit]

The 25 members of the Landtag are elected by open list proportional representation from two constituencies, Oberland with 15 seats and Unterland with 10 seats. The electoral threshold is 8%.[5]

Unterland consists of Eschen, Gamprin, Mauren, Ruggell and Schellenberg; Oberland consists of Balzers, Planken, Schaan, Triesen, Triesenberg and Vaduz.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % +/– Seats +/–
Progressive Citizens' Party 68,673 35.2 –4.8 9 –1
Patriotic Union 65,742 33.7 +0.2 8 0
The Independents 35,885 18.4 +3.1 5 +1
Free List 24,595 12.6 +1.5 3 0
Total 194,895 100 25 0
Valid ballots 14,763 95.8
Invalid/blank ballots 645 4.2
Total 15,408 100
Registered voters/turnout 19,806 77.8
Source: Landstagwahlen
Popular vote
FBP
35.2%
VU
33.7%
DU
18.4%
FL
12.6%
Parliamentary seats
FBP
36.0%
VU
32.0%
DU
20.0%
FL
12.0%

Reactions[edit]

Observers[who?] noted the success of the populist and "fringe groups"[6] DU and FL – particularly the former – as well as the losses of the ruling parties at their expense.[7][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Landtagswahlen 2017: Rekordzahl an Kandidaten". Retrieved 2016-12-29.
  2. ^ a b "New Independent party rattles Liechtenstein vote". Global Post. 3 February 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  3. ^ "Politics in tiny Liechtenstein shaken up by surprise election success of independents". Fox News. 3 February 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  4. ^ "Mehrheit der Stimmzettel wurden angepasst". Vaterland. 4 February 2013. Retrieved 4 February 2013.
  5. ^ Article 55 (1) of the Volksrechtegesetz (Law of People's Rights)[permanent dead link] Gesetze.li
  6. ^ a b Stefanini, Sara (5 February 2017). "Liechtenstein's Populists Gain Ground". Politico. Retrieved 5 February 2017.
  7. ^ "Liechtenstein Populist Party Gains Ground in Parliamentary Elections". Deutsche Welle. February 5, 2017. Retrieved February 5, 2017.