Life in the So-Called Space Age

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Life in the So-Called Space Age
God Lives Underwater-Life in the So-Called Space Age.jpg
Studio album by God Lives Underwater
Released March 24, 1998
Genre Industrial rock, electronic rock, techno
Length 72:32
Label A&M
Producer Gary Richards
God Lives Underwater chronology
Empty
(1995)
Life in the So-Called Space Age
(1998)
Rearrange EP
(1998)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]
Entertainment Weekly B+[2]

Life in the So-Called Space Age is the 1998 album released by God Lives Underwater and is their second full-length album. The title comes from the cover of the Depeche Mode album Black Celebration, where it appears in quotes on the back,[1] while the front cover features a distorted view of a skyscraper. The song "From Your Mouth" appeared in the 2000 film Gossip.

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by David Reilly and Jeff Turzo.

  1. "Intro" – 0:58
  2. "Rearrange" – 3:33
  3. "From Your Mouth" – 4:43
  4. "Can't Come Down" – 5:05
  5. "Alone Again" – 3:18
  6. "Behavior Modification" – 3:55
  7. "The Rush Is Loud" – 4:08
  8. "Dress Rehearsal for Reproduction" – 4:25
  9. "Happy?" – 5:13
  10. "Vapors" – 4:50
  11. "Medicated to the One I Love" – 32:24 (includes hidden tracks "Life In The So-Called Space Age" [25:52] and "Outro" [0:59])

Personnel[edit]

God Lives Underwater:

Reception[edit]

Ned Raggett of Allmusic wrote of their influences, "rather than simply cloning [Depeche Mode]'s own style in the fashion of bands like Camouflage, the integration of that approach with God Lives Underwater's own murky rock is even better than before."[1] Marc Weingarten of Entertainment Weekly wrote, "Whether this is a Ween-like exercise in genre parody or an earnest effort is debatable, but either way, it's good weird fun."[2] Annie Marie Cruz of CMJ New Music Monthly called it "a tolerable album filled with nothing you haven't heard before".[3] Chuck Eddy of Spin wrote that the album uses less guitars than their previous releases and recommended it to fans of OK Computer, though he found it too lacking in aggression.[4]

Chart positions[edit]

Chart Peak Position
Heatseekers 6[5]
The Billboard 200 137[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Allmusic review
  2. ^ a b review
  3. ^ Cruz, Annie Marie (May 1998). "Reviews: God Lives Underwater: Life in the So-Called Space Age". CMJ New Music Monthly (57): 42. 
  4. ^ Eddy, Chuck (June 1998). "Metal Machine Music". Spin. 14 (6): 139. 
  5. ^ "God Lives Underwater - Life in the So-Called Space Age". AllMusic. Retrieved 11 November 2009. 
  6. ^ "Life in the So-Called Space Age - God Lives Underwater" Billboard.com. Retrieved 2010-04-03