Light Miniature Aircraft LM-1

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Light Miniature Aircraft LM-1
Role Ultralight aircraft
National origin United States
Manufacturer Light Miniature Aircraft
First flight 1985
Introduction 1985
Status Plans no longer available, kits still available

The Light Miniature Aircraft LM-1, LM-2 and LM-3 are a family of American high wing, conventional landing gear, strut-braced, single engine ultralight aircraft that are scale reproductions of famous general aviation aircraft. The designs were all available as plans from Light Miniature Aircraft of Okeechobee, Florida for amateur construction.[1][2][3]

The Light Miniature Aircraft company website domain name expired on 25 May 2010 and has not been renewed.[4] The company seems to have gone out of business about 2010, but Wicks Aircraft continues to provide kits for the designs.[5][6]

Design and development[edit]

The LM-1 family were designed in the mid-1980s during the initial ultralight boom. Many pilots did not find the typical early ultralights that resemble a "flying lawnchair", such as the Pterodactyl Ascender or Eipper Quicksilver confidence inspiring or appealing. The LM line was intended to fit the same FAR Part 103 rules, including its 254 lb (115 kg) empty weight, but provide an aircraft that looks and flies much more like a traditional light aircraft. Many of the family are heavier than the US ultralight rules permit.[2]

The LM-1 family consists of a basic aircraft design, rendered in wood or optionally 4130 steel tube, with minor changes in the cowling, window and tail shapes to make them resemble well-known light aircraft. The first in the series, the LM-1 was first flown in 1985. The aircraft are sold as plans, with components or complete kits also available to speed construction time.[1][2][3]

All aircraft in the series feature enclosed cabins allowing year-round flying, docile handling characteristics and a 300-hour construction time.[2]

Variants[edit]

LM-1A-W
Single seat 85% scale replica of a Piper J-3 Cub, powered by a 50 hp (37 kW) Rotax 503 engine. Built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 350 lb (159 kg), gross weight 600 lb (272 kg). First flown in 1992.[1][7]
LM-1U
Single seat 75% scale replica of a Piper J-3 Cub, built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 252 lb (114 kg), gross weight 500 lb (227 kg). Fits the US ultralight category.[2]
LM-1X
Single seat 75% scale replica of a Piper J-3 Cub, powered by a 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447 engine. Built from steel tube and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 300 lb (136 kg), gross weight 600 lb (272 kg). First flown in 1985.[1]
LM-1-2P-W Puddle Jumper
Two seat 85% scale replica of a Piper J-3 Cub, powered by a 64 hp (48 kW) Rotax 582 engine. Built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 430 lb (195 kg), gross weight 875 lb (397 kg).[3][7]
LM-2U
Single seat 75% scale replica of a Taylorcraft B, built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 252 lb (114 kg), gross weight 500 lb (227 kg). Fits the US ultralight category.[2]
LM-2X
Single seat 75% scale replica of a Taylorcraft B, powered by a 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447 engine. Built from steel tube and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 300 lb (136 kg), gross weight 600 lb (272 kg). First flown in 1987.[1]
LM-2X-2P
Two seat 75% scale replica of a Taylorcraft B, powered by a 64 hp (48 kW) Rotax 582 engine. Built from steel tube and covered in doped aircraft fabric.[7]
LM-2X-2P-W
Two seat 75% scale replica of a Taylorcraft B, powered by a 64 hp (48 kW) Rotax 582 engine. Built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 460 lb (209 kg), gross weight 875 lb (397 kg). First flown in 1987.[1][3][7]
LM-3U
Single seat 75% scale replica of an Aeronca Champ, built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 252 lb (114 kg), gross weight 500 lb (227 kg). Fits the US ultralight category.[2]
LM-3X
Single seat 75% scale replica of an Aeronca Champ, powered by a 40 hp (30 kW) Rotax 447 engine. Built from steel tube and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 300 lb (136 kg), gross weight 600 lb (272 kg). First flown in 1987.[1][7]
LM-3X-W
Single seat 75% scale replica of an Aeronca Champ, powered by a 50 hp (37 kW) Rotax 503 engine. Built from wood and covered in doped aircraft fabric. Empty weight 335 lb (152 kg), gross weight 600 lb (272 kg).[3][7]

Specifications (LM-1X)[edit]

Data from Kitplanes[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: one
  • Length: 17 ft 9 in (5.41 m)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 0 in (9.14 m)
  • Height: 5 ft 7 in (1.70 m)
  • Wing area: 120 sq ft (11 m2)
  • Empty weight: 300 lb (136 kg)
  • Gross weight: 600 lb (272 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 5 US gallons (19 litres)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Rotax 447 twin cylinder, two-stroke aircraft engine, 40 hp (30 kW)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed wooden propeller

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 75 mph (121 km/h; 65 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 65 mph (105 km/h; 56 kn)
  • Stall speed: 26 mph (42 km/h; 23 kn)
  • Range: 173 mi; 278 km (150 nmi)
  • Rate of climb: 550 ft/min (2.8 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 5.0 lb/sq ft (24 kg/m2)

Avionics
none

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Downey, Julia: 1999 Kit Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 15, Number 12, December 1998, page 55. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Cliche, Andre: Ultralight Aircraft Shopper's Guide 8th Edition, page B-38. Cybair Limited Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-9680628-1-4
  3. ^ a b c d e Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, page 197. BAI Communications. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  4. ^ Network Solutions (May 2010). "Lightminiatureaircraft.com". Retrieved 5 June 2010. 
  5. ^ "Light Miniature Aircraft website archives". Archive.org. 13 March 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2015. 
  6. ^ Wicks Aircraft. "Aircraft Kits". Retrieved 13 March 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f Light Miniature Aircraft (May 2008). "Kit Planes, Plans & Manuals". Archived from the original on 31 May 2008. Retrieved 1 June 2010. 

External links[edit]