Lila M. Gierasch

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Lila Mary Gierasch (born 1948 in Needham, Massachusetts) is an American biochemist and biophysicist.

Life[edit]

Lila M. Gierasch, like her mother Marian Bookhout Gierasch, studied at Mount Holyoke College.[1] She graduated in 1970 with a Bachelor degree in chemistry. She then went to Harvard University as a doctoral student and earned her doctorate in biophysics in 1975. Since 1974 she taught at Amherst College, where she worked as an assistant professor in chemistry. She worked under Jean-Marie Lehn at Université Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg between 1977 and 1978. In 1979 she went to University of Delaware for a position as an assistant professor, and was promoted to a professor in chemistry in 1985. Gierasch was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1986 for molecular and cellular biology.[2] In 1988 she moved to University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and worked as a professor in pharmacology for six years. She was the chair of Robert A. Welch Professor of Biochemistry.

In Texas she met her husband John Pylant, who she married in 1991.[3] She returned to Massachusetts in 1994, and has been a Professor of Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology ever since. She is Head of the Department of Chemistry and the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of University of Massachusetts Amherst.[4][5]

In 2019, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lila Gierasch. Mount Holyoke College. Accessed 28 August 2014.
  2. ^ "Search Results - John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation". web.archive.org. 2012-10-06. Retrieved 2019-05-01.
  3. ^ JOHN PYLANT LILA GIERASCH, Texas Marriage Record Index, 1966–2008. Mocavo, DC Thomson Family History. Accessed 30 August 2014.
  4. ^ Biophysicist in Profile: Lila Gierasch. Biophysical Society Newsletter, January/February 2003. Accessed 26 August 2014.
  5. ^ Curriculum vitae—Lila M. Gierasch. Gierasch Lab, University of Massachusetts Amherst. Accessed 26 August 2014.
  6. ^ "2019 NAS Election". www.nasonline.org. Retrieved 30 April 2019.