Lily Hanbury

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Lily Hanbury
Lily Hanbury 001.jpg
Born
Lilian Florence Alcock

1873
St Pancras, London
Died5 March 1908
St Giles, London

Lily Hanbury (1873 – 5 March 1908) was an English stage performer.

Hanbury was born Lilian Florence Alcock,[1] the daughter of Elizabeth (née Davis) and Matthew Henry Alcock.[2] Educated in London, her début was in an 1888 revival of W. S. Gilbert's Pygmalion and Galatea;[3] and later she appeared on most of the leading stages of the English metropolis. Her extensive career included playing 'Countess Wintersen' in The Stranger, 'Hetty Preene' in G. R. Sims's Lights o' London, and 'Petra' in Ibsen's Enemy of the People.

Hanbury reached the peak of her popularity by playing a number or parts in Shakespearian plays, mainly under the management of Wilson Barrett and Herbert Beerbohm Tree.

She died on 5 March 1908 of medical complications following the delivery of a still-born child.[3] Her remains were cremated and her ashes interred at the Jewish Cemetery at Willesden, England.

Hanbury's younger sister, Hilda, also an actress and also at one time a member of Beerbohm Tree's theatrical company, is the grandmother of Edward Fox and James Fox and the great-grandmother of Freddie, Emilia, and Laurence Fox.[4]

Lily and her sister Hilda had a pet dog named "Wobbles" who died in 1900 and is buried in Hyde Park's pet cemetery.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915". www.ancestry.co.uk. Retrieved 26 December 2014. ('Subscription required')
  2. ^ http://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/wdytya_emiliafox.php
  3. ^ a b "Death of Lily Hanbury. London Actress Who Was Prominently Associated with Mr. Tree". The New York Times. 6 March 1908. Retrieved 9 September 2011. Note that Pygmalion and Galatea did not play at the Savoy Theatre in 1888, so the NYT is in error on that point.
  4. ^ "Emilia Fox". Who Do You Think You Are?. Series 8. Episode 5. 7 September 2011. BBC One.
  5. ^ Inside Hyde Park's Secret Pet Cemetery in The Daily Telegraph

External links[edit]