Lina Tsaldari

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Lina Tsaldari
Photo of Lina Tsaldari.jpg
Born1887 (1887)
Died17 October 1981(1981-10-17) (aged 93–94)
NationalityGreek
OccupationPolitician
Known forfirst female minister in Greece
Spouse
Panagis Tsaldaris
(m. 1919; died in 1936)

Lina Tsaldari (Greek: Λίνα Τσαλδάρη; 1887 – 17 October 1981) was a right-wing Greek politician. She became the first female minister in Greece in 1956, serving as the Minister for Social Welfare under Konstantinos Karamanlis' government.

Early life[edit]

Tsaldari was born Lina Lambrou (Greek: Λίνα Λάμπρου) in 1887 to Spyridon Lambros (b. 1851 - d. 1919), who succeeded Nikolaos Kalogeropoulos as Prime Minister of Greece, serving from October 1916 to February 1917. Tsaldari was of Aromanian descent,[1] just like her father.[2]

Political career[edit]

Tsaldari became the first woman to serve in the Government of Greece, serving as the Minister of Social Welfare.[3] She was also an active suffragist. After serving in Parliament, she became Permanent Representative of Greece to the United Nations.

Personal life[edit]

Tsaldari married Panagis Tsaldaris (b. 1868 – d. 1936) in 1919, the same year that her father died in Skopelos. Like her father, Tsaldaris served as Prime Minister of Greece.

Death[edit]

Tsaldari died of a stroke on 17 October 1981. She was 94 years old.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jovanovski, Dalibor; Minov, Nikola (2017). "Ioannis Kolettis. The Vlach from the ruling elite of Greece". Balcanica Posnaniensia. Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. 24 (1): 222–223. ISSN 2450-3177. Retrieved 8 May 2017.
  2. ^ Kahl, Thede (2003). "Aromanians in Greece: Minority or Vlach-speaking Greeks?" (PDF). Jahrbücher für Geschichte und Kultur Südosteuropas. 5: 8. Indeed, the list of examples of Aromanians in Greek history is quite impressive: [...] Spyridon Lambros (1851-1919, historian and politician)
  3. ^ Mazower, Mark (2000). After the War was Over: Reconstructing the Family, Nation, and State in Greece, 1943-1960. Princeton University Press. p. 119. ISBN 9780691058429.
  4. ^ "Lina Tsaldaris". The New York Times. 18 October 1981. Retrieved 21 July 2019.