Lincoln Versailles

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This article is about the Lincoln Versailles. For the Ford branded vehicle, see Ford Versailles.
Lincoln Versailles
Lincoln Versailles, 1980.png
1980 Lincoln Versailles
Overview
Manufacturer Lincoln (Ford)
Production 1977–1980
Assembly United States: Wayne, Michigan (Wayne Stamping & Assembly)
United States: Mahwah, New Jersey (Mahwah Assembly)
Body and chassis
Class Mid-size luxury car
Body style 4-door sedan
Layout FR layout
Related Mercury Monarch
Ford Granada
Powertrain
Engine 351 cu in (5.8 L) Windsor V8
302 cu in (4.9 L) Windsor V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 109.9 in (2,791 mm)[1]
Length 200.9 in (5,103 mm)[1]
Width 74.5 in (1,892 mm)[1]
Height 54.1 in (1,374 mm)[1]
Curb weight 3,827–3,915 pounds (1,736–1,776 kg)[2][3]
Chronology
Successor Lincoln Continental (1982)

The Lincoln Versailles (English /vɛərˈs/ vair-SY or /vərˈs/ vər-SY) is a mid-size luxury car manufactured by Lincoln as a rebadged variant of the Ford Granada and Mercury Monarch.[4] Marketed solely as a 4-door sedan from 1977 to 1980, the Versailles reached a production total of 50,156[5] and was noted as the first production vehicle to offer clearcoat paint.[4]

The Versailles was named after the 17th century palace outside Paris.

History[edit]

Rear ¾ view, Lincoln Versailles

As with the Cadillac Seville, and the Chrysler LeBaron, the Versailles was marketed in response to the 1973 oil crisis, and was differentiated from the Ford Granada/Mercury Monarch by front end styling, quad headlights, grille, wheel covers and faux spare tire trunk lid. Otherwise, the vehicle including dash, doors, windows and overall bodywork was noticeably unchanged from its rebadged variants; the base trim level Versailles for model year 1977, was virtually identical to the Mercury Grand Monarch Ghia—which also carried a 50% lower MSRP.

The Versailles featured "matched and balance" driveline elements, low-friction lower ball joints, double isolated shocks, reinforced chassis areas, sound insulation and balanced forged aluminum wheels with Michelin X-radials. Bodywork received the first clearcoat paint on a regular production car.”[6] Final assembly included dynamometer testing of the engine/transmission, a water spray test to pinpoint body leaks, and a simulated road test.

The standard 351 cu in (5.8 L) V8 was carbureted, as opposed to the Seville's fuel injected 350 cu in (5.7 L). The Versailles ultimately received the smaller 302 cu in (4.9 L) V8, a shared option with the Mercury Monarch.

The rear differential used in the Versailles was Ford 9 inch with rear disc brakes, replacing the drums on the Granada and the Monarch. A unique and rigorous quality-control regime was also used at the factory, according to advertising.

Having sold 15,000 units in 1977,[5] compared to the Seville's 45,000, the 1979 Versailles received a faux carriage-style landau roof employing a fiberglass cap with a vinyl overlay and differing rear window frames. 1979 sales reached 21,000.[5] Production ended before the end of the 1980 model year with approximately 4,000 manufactured.[5]

Model Year Total Production
1977 15,434[7]
1978 8,931[8]
1979 21,007[9]
1980 4,784[10]

Technical specifications[edit]

Engine Model Displacement Horsepower output Torque output Transmission type
Ford Windsor V8 302 cubic inches (4.9 liters) 133 bhp (99 kW; 135 PS)@ 3600 RPM 243 lb·ft (329 N·m) @ 1600 RPM Ford C4 3-speed automatic
Ford Windsor V8 351 cubic inches (5.8 liters) 135 bhp (101 kW; 137 PS)@ 3200 RPM 275 lb·ft (373 N·m)@ 1600 RPM Ford C4 3-speed automatic
[11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "1978 Versailles Brochure". Retrieved January 29, 2011. 
  2. ^ 1980 LINCOLN VERSAILLES 5.0L Select-Shift data in automobile-catalog.com
  3. ^ 1977 LINCOLN VERSAILLES 351-2V Select-Shift data in automobile-catalog.com
  4. ^ a b "Obscure American Car: Lincoln Versailles". CNet.com, September 15, 2013, Dan Duncan. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Production & Registry totals". The Granada-Monarch-Versailles Registry. Retrieved April 17, 2009. 
  6. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.595.
  7. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.596.
  8. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.597.
  9. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.599.
  10. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.601.
  11. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.596. 351 specs
  12. ^ Flammang, James Standard Catalog of American Cars 1976-1999 3rd Edition (Iola, WI: Krause Publications, Inc 1999), p.597. 302 specs

External links[edit]