Lindsborg, Kansas

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Lindsborg, Kansas
City
Lindsborg in the early 20th century
Lindsborg in the early 20th century
Nickname(s): Little Sweden
Location within McPherson County and Kansas
Location within McPherson County and Kansas
KDOT map of McPherson County (legend)
KDOT map of McPherson County (legend)
Coordinates: 38°34′25″N 97°40′28″W / 38.57361°N 97.67444°W / 38.57361; -97.67444Coordinates: 38°34′25″N 97°40′28″W / 38.57361°N 97.67444°W / 38.57361; -97.67444[1]
Country United States
State Kansas
County McPherson
Government
 • Type Mayor–Council
Area[2]
 • Total 1.69 sq mi (4.38 km2)
 • Land 1.67 sq mi (4.33 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation[1] 1,332 ft (406 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 3,458
 • Estimate (2015)[4] 3,383
 • Density 2,000/sq mi (790/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67456
Area code 785
FIPS code 20-41375 [1][5]
GNIS feature ID 0477070 [1][6]
Website LindsborgCity.org

Lindsborg is a city in McPherson County, Kansas, United States.[1] As of the 2010 census, the city population was 3,458.[7] It is known for its association with Swedish heritage and the biennial Svensk Hyllningsfest.

History[edit]

Rosberg House, bed and breakfast (2004)
Dala Horse statue (2007)

For many millennia, the Great Plains of North America was inhabited by nomadic Native Americans. From the 16th century to 18th century, the Kingdom of France claimed ownership of large parts of North America. In 1762, after the French and Indian War, France secretly ceded New France to Spain, per the Treaty of Fontainebleau.

In 1802, Spain returned most of the land to France. In 1803, most of the land for modern day Kansas was acquired by the United States from France as part of the 828,000 square mile Louisiana Purchase for 2.83 cents per acre.

In 1854, the Kansas Territory was organized, then in 1861 Kansas became the 34th U.S. state. In 1867, McPherson County was established within the Kansas Territory, which included the land for modern day Lindsborg.

Lindsborg was settled in the spring of 1869 by a group of Swedish immigrants from the Värmland province of Sweden led by Pastor Olof Olsson.[8] Today, thirty percent of the population is of Swedish heritage. The downtown features gift shops that specialize in Swedish souvenirs, including various sizes of dala horses. Lindsborg is known as "Little Sweden" because it was originally built up chiefly by Swedish immigrants in the late 19th century.

The city's Swedish-language name means Linden Castle in English.[9] It was named for 3 men (whose typical names included that tree's name), Messrs. Lind, Lindgren and Lindahl, who had held prominent positions in a Chicago organization of Swedish farmers (Svenska Lantbrukskompaniet) which was involved in the settling of Lindsborg until 1877.[10]

The first railroad was built through Lindsborg in 1879, and it was incorporated as a city in that same year.[11]

Lindsborg has long been noted for the Svensk Hyllningsfest and other efforts to remember its Swedish pioneer heritage. Svensk Hyllningsfest is a biennial celebration held in October of odd-numbered years since 1941, to celebrate the town's Swedish heritage.[12]

The Swedish Pavilion was originally built as an international exposition building for the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. After the fair, the Swedish Pavilion was purchased by W.W. Thomas, U.S. Minister to Sweden and Norway, and presented to Bethany College in Lindsborg as a memorial to his friend Dr. Rev. Carl Aaron Swensson, the founder of Bethany College who had recently died. The Pavilion was moved to Bethany College in Lindsborg, where it was used for classroom, library, museum and department facilities for the art department. The Swedish Pavilion was moved to the McPherson County Old Mill Museum, also in Lindsborg in 1969.[13]

Lindsborg also has an art museum showcasing the works of the artist and later resident, Birger Sandzen. The Gallery was dedicated on October 20, 1957 on the Bethany College campus. It houses the largest and most extensive collection of his paintings, prints, drawings and watercolors found anywhere in the world.[14]

Geography[edit]

Lindsborg is located at 38°34′25″N 97°40′28″W / 38.57361°N 97.67444°W / 38.57361; -97.67444 (38.5736176, -97.6744838).[1] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.69 square miles (4.38 km2), of which, 1.67 square miles (4.33 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[2]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Lindsborg has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[15]

Area events[edit]

Birger Sandzén Memorial Gallery (2004)
  • Svensk Hyllningsfest is a biennial tribute to the Swedish pioneers occurring in October of odd numbered years.

Area attractions[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 466
1890 968 107.7%
1900 1,279 32.1%
1910 1,939 51.6%
1920 1,897 −2.2%
1930 2,016 6.3%
1940 1,913 −5.1%
1950 2,383 24.6%
1960 2,609 9.5%
1970 2,764 5.9%
1980 3,155 14.1%
1990 3,076 −2.5%
2000 3,321 8.0%
2010 3,458 4.1%
Est. 2015 3,383 [4] −2.2%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 3,458 people, 1,303 households, and 829 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,070.7 inhabitants per square mile (799.5/km2). There were 1,414 housing units at an average density of 846.7 per square mile (326.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.8% White, 1.7% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.8% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.5% of the population.

There were 1,303 households of which 28.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.4% were non-families. 31.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the city was 37.8 years. 20.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 17.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18.7% were from 25 to 44; 23.6% were from 45 to 64; and 19.9% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 3,321 people, 1,227 households, and 775 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,155.5 people per square mile (832.6/km²). There were 1,331 housing units at an average density of 863.9 per square mile (333.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.05% White, 1.11% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.30% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.60% of the population. 36.0% were of Swedish, 22.3% German, 8.4% American, 6.4% English and 5.7% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.[16][17]

There were 1,227 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 33.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the city the population was spread out with 20.5% under the age of 18, 18.7% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 20.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,500, and the median income for a family was $46,250. Males had a median income of $32,500 versus $25,145 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,415. About 4.9% of families and 8.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.0% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Bethany College in Lindsborg

Primary and secondary education[edit]

Lindsborg is part of Unified School District 400.[18][19] Lindsborg is the home of:

  • Smoky Valley High School
  • Smoky Valley Middle School
  • Soderstrom Elementary

College[edit]

Other[edit]

Transportation[edit]

K-4 highway passes through Lindsborg. Bus service is provided daily towards Wichita and Salina by BeeLine Express (subcontractor of Greyhound Lines).[21][22]

Notable people[edit]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • The Americanization of a Swedish Colony in Kansas; Julius Lundstrom; 1972.
  • Northern McPherson County Centennial Observance; Marie E. Malm; Lindsborg News-Record, 1970.
  • The Smoky Valley in the After Years; Ruth B. Billdt; Lindsborg News-Record, 1969.
  • Smoky Valley People: A History of Lindsborg, Kansas; Emory K. Lindquist, 1953.
  • Swedish Day in Lindsborg; Mrs. Carl Peterson; Enterprise Journal; May 26, 1938.
  • Lindsborg, Kansas: Fragments of History by the City Schools; Lindsborg City Schools; 1927.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) details for Lindsborg, Kansas; United States Geological Survey (USGS); October 13, 1978.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  4. ^ a b "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "2010 City Population and Housing Occupancy Status". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2011. 
  8. ^ Little Sweden on the Prairie (The Local Europe AB)
  9. ^ Engelsk-svenska ordboken ISBN 91-24-34422-2 pp 211 & 44
  10. ^ Prins Wilhelm in Amerika från estraden, Norstedts, Stockholm, 1928, pp 183 & 195 (re: origin of name and farmers' organization)
  11. ^ Blackmar, Frank Wilson (1912). Kansas: A Cyclopedia of State History, Volume 2. Standard Publishing Company. p. 165. 
  12. ^ The Origins of the Festival (Svensk Hyllningsfest)
  13. ^ Carl Aaron Swensson
  14. ^ Its History (Birger Sandzén Memorial Gallery)
  15. ^ Climate Summary for Lindsborg, Kansas
  16. ^ U.S. Census Bureau - 2000 Census, Population and Housing Unit Counts for Kansas
  17. ^ U.S. Census Bureau - 1990 Census, Population and Housing Unit Counts for Kansas
  18. ^ USD 400
  19. ^ Kansas School District Boundary Map
  20. ^ May 2006 National Geographic Magazine
  21. ^ BeeLine Express
  22. ^ Greyhound Lines
  23. ^ "Biography for Jay Emler – Kansas Senate majority leader". Retrieved 2013-03-04. 
  24. ^ "College Football". ESPN. May 11, 2010. 

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Historical
Maps