Lineboro, Maryland

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Lineboro, Maryland
Unincorporated community
Looking south on Main Street in Lineboro, Maryland
Looking south on Main Street in Lineboro, Maryland
Lineboro is located in Maryland
Lineboro
Lineboro
Lineboro is located in the US
Lineboro
Lineboro
Coordinates: 39°43′9.84″N 76°50′41.03″W / 39.7194000°N 76.8447306°W / 39.7194000; -76.8447306
Country United States
State Maryland
County Carroll
Elevation 689 ft (210 m)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 21088
Area code(s) 410,443,667

Lineboro is an unincorporated community located in northeastern Carroll County, Maryland, in the United States. The community was named for its location on the Mason–Dixon line.

History[edit]

Much of the town was added to the National Register of Historic Places as the Lineboro Historic District in 1996.[1] Lineboro was founded around 1721 by Jonathan Line. He built a house on what is today Main street, The house was built on a farm. Later the railroad came to Lineboro and stopped at the line farm. Today the Line house is still standing where Warner and Sons feed processing plant is located. Jon Line wanted his town to be connected to all surrounding places. At the age of 47 he ordered slaves to build route 86 to Manchester. At the age of 71 Jon and his wife Margaret had their 12th and final child. Most of Lineboro is all descendants homes. Margaret died in 1785 at the age of 76. Jon lived a long life for colonial times, Jon lived to be 97 and died of strep throat. After his death his son began to run the town. He wasn't a very good town leader most people left and went to nearby Manchester or Hampstead some even went to Baltimore. Jones son himself later fled the town leaving a man that had just come to visit in charge. Jon's son was named Thomas. In 1804 Thomas moved to Reisterstown. He lived at 424 main street in Reisterstown and later in 1808 he had saved up enough money to buy 114 acres of land in Woodensburg Md. Part of his land was also in Upperco Md. Thomas built a house at 15008 Hanover Pike. He built two barns, a corn shed white two corn cribs and hay storage, a pig barn, a chicken house, a tractor shed, and a forge. Only one of the barns stands today and the tractor shed and corn shed collapsed in a storm. He lived at the farm, Farmming corn and hay for 16 years then he moved back to lineboro at the age of 52. He lived in his parts house which was abandon when he got back, but the town had almost 3,000 people living there more than today. As Thomas' farm dreams were long gone now his land in Lineboro had been turned into roads and houses. In 1879 Thomas moved Back to Woodensburg outside of at this time Glyndon. Thomas built a house at 13824 Hanover Pike. The house was on 155 acres. The house he built before was sold at an auction. He really couldn't farm cause he was 94 years old. He had family from all over farm his land while Lineboro was no longer having any town leaders. in 1881 at the age of 96 Thomas Line died of pneumonia. All of his homes still stand today. At the same time of his death born a year earlier was sister Josefine. She was a very healthy person. During Thomas' death in 1881 she was 97 almost 98. She lived on a huge farm on Millers Station road her house was 3640 Millers Station road. She died in the year of 1886 at the age of 103. She died a natural death of old age. Her farm Still stands today as a small residential farmette instead of what it used to as a 294-acre farm.

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 

Coordinates: 39°43′9.84″N 76°50′41.03″W / 39.7194000°N 76.8447306°W / 39.7194000; -76.8447306