Lippincott

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Lippincott
Partnership
Industry Strategy consulting
Founded New York City, 1943
Headquarters New York City
Key people
Rick Wise, CEO
Products Brand, Innovation, Culture
Revenue NA
Number of employees
NA
Parent Oliver Wyman Group
Website lippincott.com

Lippincott is a creative consultancy with services in brand strategy, design, innovation and culture change.

History[edit]

The firm was founded in 1943 as Dohner & Lippincott by Donald R. Dohner and J. Gordon Lippincott, who taught together at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, NY. After Dohner's sudden death in December of that year, the name was eventually changed to J. Gordon Lippincott & Associates. In the late 1940s, Lippincott joined forces with Walter P. Margulies, and the firm was renamed Lippincott & Margulies.[1]

From 2003 to 2007, the firm was known as Lippincott Mercer. The firm is now part of Oliver Wyman Group, a business unit of Marsh & McLennan Companies.

The Tucker '48 automobile[edit]

In 1947, legendary and controversial automobile designer Preston Tucker hired J. Gordon Lippincott & Associates to replace automotive designer Alex Tremulis in the body development of the 1948 Tucker Sedan. The Lippincott team was headed by designer Hal Bergstrom and included Read Viemeister, Budd Steinhilber, Tucker Madawick and Philip Egan. The team designed a new front end and modified the rear end of the car to match the side panels and roof previously developed by Tremulis.

Consumer research, analytics and brand strategy[edit]

Lippincott were early pioneers of consumer research, analytics and brand strategy. The firm has continued to invest in the development of intellectual capital that pushes the boundaries of the industry's approaches. Lippincott's first Sense Magazine was published in 1956, creating an industry tradition of developing and sharing thought leadership. Today, the firm continues to publish groundbreaking consumer research, with recent insights including The Happiness Halo, Welcome to the Human Era and Customer of the Future.

The Original Icons[edit]

The Coca-Cola ribbon, Betty Crocker spoon and American Express blue box are more than symbols. Their longevity is a testament to the emotional connections a brand can forge. Like the CITGO trimark still standing in Fenway Park, or Andy Warhol’s 1962 tribute to Campbell’s soup on display at the MoMA, Lippincott's work has sustained decades of change, seamlessly integrating with the cultural landscape it has been shaped by and has in turn shaped.

Brand, innovation, culture[edit]

Whether taking Starbucks beyond coffee, helping Delta achieve new heights or partnering with Samsung to disrupt new categories, Lippincott's multidisciplinary teams continue to blaze trails with leaders all around the world. By maintaining the same pioneering spirit the firm was founded with, Lippincott designs new ways to make an impact every day.

References[edit]

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