Lisa Goldstein

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For the American actress, see Lisa Goldstein (actress).
Lisa Goldstein
Born Elizabeth Joy Goldstein
(1953-11-21) November 21, 1953 (age 62)
Los Angeles, California, US
Pen name Isabel Glass
Occupation Novelist
Language English
Nationality American
Alma mater University of California, Los Angeles
Genres Fantasy, science fiction
Notable awards
Spouse Douglas A. Asherman (1986–present)
Website
brazenhussies.net/goldstein

Lisa Goldstein (born November 21, 1953) is a fantasy and science fiction writer whose work has been nominated for Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy Awards. Her 1982 novel The Red Magician won a National Book Award in the one-year category Original Paperback[1] and was praised by Philip K. Dick shortly before his death.[2] Her 2011 novel, The Uncertain Places, won the 2012 Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Adult Literature, and her short story, "Paradise Is a Walled Garden," won the 2011 Sidewise Award for Best Short-Form Alternate History.

Life[edit]

Elizabeth Joy "Lisa" Goldstein's father was Heinz Jurgen "Harry" Goldstein (born June 8, 1922 in Krefeld, Germany; died May 24, 1974 in Los Angeles), a survivor of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp; her mother, Miriam Roth (born April 8, 1922 in Mukachevo, Czechoslovakia; died October 12, 2011 in Los Angeles), survived the extermination camp Auschwitz. Her parents came to the United States in 1947 and met in an ESL class.

She has written two high fantasy novels, Daughter of Exile and The Divided Crown, under the pen name "Isabel Glass." Her publisher recommended a pseudonym because they differ so much from her other work. "Isabel" is from Point Isabel Regional Shoreline, a local park which includes a dog run. "Glass" fits the Tor Books standard for pseudonyms, short surnames in the first half of the alphabet.[3]

She married Douglas A. Asherman in 1986, and lives in Oakland, California.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • The Red Magician (1982)
  • The Dream Years (1985)
  • A Mask for the General (1987)
  • Tourists (1989)
  • Strange Devices of the Sun and Moon (1993)
  • Summer King, Winter Fool (1994)
  • Walking the Labyrinth (1996)
  • Dark Cities Underground (1999)
  • The Alchemist's Door (2002)
  • Daughter of Exile (as Isabel Glass; 2004)
  • The Divided Crown (as Isabel Glass; 2005)
  • The Uncertain Places (2011)
  • Weighing Shadows (2015)

Collections[edit]

  • Daily Voices (1989)
  • Travellers in Magic (1994)

Awards[edit]

Nominations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Book Awards – 1983". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-03-08.
  2. ^ "The Red Magician". Macmillan. Retrieved 2014-02-06.
  3. ^ "Why I Became Isabel Glass" (2006). Lisa Goldstein. Retrieved 2008-12-11.
  4. ^ "Sidewise Awards for Alternate History". Sidewise Awards. Retrieved 2014-02-06.
  5. ^ "Mythopoeic Awards – 2012". Mythopoeic Society. Retrieved 2014-02-06.
  6. ^ a b "Lisa Goldstein". Science Fiction Awards Database. Retrieved 2016-05-11. 
  7. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1986". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  8. ^ "1988 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-19. 
  9. ^ "Nebula Awards 1988". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 11 January 2014. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  10. ^ "Arthur C. Clarke Award 1990". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  11. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1993". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  12. ^ "Nebula Awards 1994". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-03-05. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  13. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1995". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  14. ^ "Nebula Awards 1996". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2016-03-06. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  15. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1998". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  16. ^ "Nebula Awards 1999". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  17. ^ "Mythopoeic Awards 2000". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 
  18. ^ "Nebula Awards 2009". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 2016-04-29. 

External links[edit]