Lisa Nandy

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Lisa Nandy
MP
Official portrait of Lisa Nandy crop 2.jpg
Official Parliamentary Portrait of Lisa Nandy
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
In office
13 September 2015 – 27 June 2016
Leader Jeremy Corbyn
Shadowing Amber Rudd
Preceded by Caroline Flint
Succeeded by Barry Gardiner
Member of Parliament
for Wigan
Assumed office
6 May 2010
Preceded by Neil Turner
Majority 16,027 (33.7%)
Personal details
Born Lisa Eva Nandy
(1979-08-09) 9 August 1979 (age 39)
Manchester, England
Political party Labour
Children 1
Father Dipak Nandy
Alma mater Newcastle University
University of London
Website Official website

Lisa Eva Nandy (born 9 August 1979)[1][2] is a British Labour Party politician who has been Member of Parliament (MP) for Wigan since 2010.[3]

She served under Jeremy Corbyn as Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change from September 2015 [4] until June 2016.[5] Preceding this, she had served as Shadow Minister for Children and Shadow Minister for Charities.[6]

Early life and career[edit]

Nandy was born in Manchester to Luise Nandy (née Byers) and her then-husband Dipak Nandy.[7][8][9] Luise Byers' father, Lord (Frank) Byers, had been a Liberal Party MP and held many offices in the party.[10] Nandy grew up both in Manchester and in Bury, Greater Manchester, to where her family later moved.

She was educated at Parrs Wood High School,[11] a mixed comprehensive school in East Didsbury in Manchester, followed by Holy Cross College, Bury and Newcastle University, Tyne and Wear, from which she graduated in 2001 with a degree in politics and obtained a master's degree in public policy from Birkbeck, University of London.

Nandy has worked in the voluntary sector, as a researcher at the homelessness charity Centrepoint from 2003 to 2005, and then as senior policy adviser at The Children's Society from 2005,[7][12] where she specialised in issues facing young refugees, also acting as adviser to the Children's Commissioner for England and to the Independent Asylum Commission.[13]

Political career[edit]

Wigan MP[edit]

Nandy served as a Labour councillor for Hammersmith Broadway ward,[14] Hammersmith and Fulham, from 4 May 2006 to 10 May 2010.[15] She was selected as the Labour parliamentary candidate for Wigan constituency in February 2010 from an all-women shortlist.[16] Elected to parliament on 7 May 2010, she became the constituency's first female MP[17] and one of the first six Asian female MPs elected.

She was appointed to the Education Select Committee on 12 July 2010[18] and was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Shadow Cabinet Minister for the Olympics, Tessa Jowell, in October 2010.[19] In 2012, she was made shadow junior education minister after the reshuffle triggered by the resignation of Peter Hain. In October 2013 she was appointed shadow charities minister.[20]

Following Labour's election defeat in May 2015 and Ed Miliband's subsequent resignation as party leader, there was some media speculation that Nandy would announce her candidacy in the leadership contest.[21] Nandy declined and endorsed Andy Burnham.[22] In August 2015, Owen Jones, the left-wing journalist, revealed in a blog post that he initially tried to draft Nandy into running for the leadership – the recent birth of her son, however, prevented such a campaign from materialising.[23] Nandy had also been touted as an MP who could potentially succeed Jeremy Corbyn, before the 2017 general election.[24][25]

Shadow Cabinet[edit]

On 14 September 2015, it was announced that Nandy had been appointed to serve as Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change in the Shadow Cabinet of Jeremy Corbyn.[26] Along with many colleagues, she resigned from her post on 27 June 2016.[27]

2016 leadership election[edit]

Nandy at the 2016 Labour Party Conference

In the wake of the resignation of dozens of shadow ministers, Nandy was approached by members of the Parliamentary Labour Party who wanted her to stand against Jeremy Corbyn in the leadership election that was to unfold. MPs felt that Nandy and eventual candidate Owen Smith were both soft left politicians who 'Corbynites' could vote for; however, Nandy declined to stand and instead served as co-chair of Smith's campaign team.[28]

After the election resulted in Corbyn's re-election, Nandy announced that she did not intend to return to the frontbench without the re-introduction of Shadow Cabinet elections, which had been abolished by Ed Miliband in 2011 (the last election being held in 2010). She also spoke of the abuse she had received for not supporting Corbyn, which she described as leaving her "genuinely frightened". She compared her treatment to that which she had received at the hand of the far-right when she first campaigned to become MP for Wigan in 2010.[29]

Voting record[edit]

According to They Work For You, Nandy has voted the same way as other Labour MPs on the vast majority of issues since 2010:

Personal life[edit]

Her partner, Andy Collis, is a public relations consultant. She has a son, who was born in Wigan Infirmary in April 2015.[30]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement of Persons Nominated and Notice of Poll" (PDF). Wigan Council. 20 April 2010. p. 7. Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 March 2012. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  2. ^ "Lisa Nandy". Democracy Live. BBC. 2010. Archived from the original on 7 August 2011. Retrieved 16 June 2010. 
  3. ^ "Election 2010: Constituency: Wigan". BBC News. BBC. 7 May 2010. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  4. ^ "Who's who in Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn's shadow cabinet". BBC News. 14 September 2015. Archived from the original on 27 December 2016. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  5. ^ "Who's staying and who's going in the shadow cabinet?". BBC News. 28 June 2016. Archived from the original on 28 March 2017. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  6. ^ "Lisa Nandy is appointed shadow charities minister in Labour reshuffle". Archived from the original on 2 October 2017. Retrieved 31 January 2017. 
  7. ^ a b "Election 2010: Lisa Nandy (Lab)". Manchester Evening News. M.E.N. Media. May 2010. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  8. ^ Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage. Kelly's Directories. 2000. p. 255. ISBN 978-0-333-54577-5. 
  9. ^ Ali, Arif (1988). Third World impact (8 ed.). Hansib Pub. p. 39. ISBN 978-1-870518-04-8. 
  10. ^ "Keeping it in the Family". Scribd. Archived from the original on 23 February 2014. 
  11. ^ "About us > Alumni". Parrs Wood High School. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 31 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "Lisa Nandy". Refugee and Migrant Justice. 22 October 2009. Archived from the original on 21 June 2010. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  13. ^ "Policy Area – Young Refugees". The Children's Society. Archived from the original on 10 May 2010. Retrieved 17 June 2010. 
  14. ^ "2006 Council". 4 December 2015. Retrieved 28 March 2018. 
  15. ^ "Councillor Lisa Nandy". London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham. Archived from the original on 8 June 2011. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  16. ^ Smith, Mark (4 February 2010). "The Northerner: 'I bet she had to ask for directions to Wigan'". guardian.co.uk. London: Guardian News and Media. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  17. ^ "Lisa Nandy: 'I am proud to be first female MP for Wigan'". Wigan Today. Johnston Publishing. 7 May 2010. Archived from the original on 13 May 2010. Retrieved 13 May 2010. 
  18. ^ "Education Committee – membership". UK Parliament Website. Archived from the original on 2 July 2013. Retrieved 10 February 2011. 
  19. ^ "Wigan MP Lisa Nandy Promoted to Olympic Role in Labour's Shadow Team". Lisa Nandy: Labour MP for Wigan. 13 October 2010. Archived from the original on 29 November 2010. Retrieved 10 February 2011. 
  20. ^ Ainsworth, David (9 October 2013). "Lisa Nandy is appointed shadow charities minister in Labour reshuffle". Third Sector. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 28 March 2015. 
  21. ^ Isabel Hardman (8 May 2015). "Labour leadership campaign: who might have a pop?". The Spectator. Archived from the original on 10 May 2015. 
  22. ^ "List of MPs' endorsements of the Labour leadership candidates". New Statesman. 22 May 2015. Archived from the original on 23 May 2015. Retrieved 23 May 2015. 
  23. ^ Owen Jones (29 August 2015). "My honest thoughts on the Corbyn campaign—and overcoming formidable obstacles". Medium. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. 
  24. ^ Rafael Behr (2 September 2015). "Jeremy Corbyn may prevail, but he has no monopoly on virtue". Archived from the original on 21 September 2016. 
  25. ^ Jane Merrick and Mark Leftly (19 July 2015). "Jeremy Corbyn: Labour MPs are plotting a coup against the potential leader if he is elected". Archived from the original on 21 July 2017. 
  26. ^ Walker, Peter (16 September 2015). "Jeremy Corbyn's shadow cabinet in full". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 18 August 2016. Retrieved 3 July 2016. 
  27. ^ Syal, Rajeev; Perraudin, Frances; Slawson, Nicola (27 June 2016). "Shadow cabinet resignations: who has gone and who is staying". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 22 July 2016. Retrieved 3 July 2016. 
  28. ^ Jim Waterson (23 September 2016). "How The Labour Coup Failed". Buzzfeed UK. Archived from the original on 10 October 2016. 
  29. ^ Jon Stone (26 September 2016). "Labour leadership contest abuse 'reminded me of far right', MP Lisa Nandy says". The Independent. Archived from the original on 3 December 2017. 
  30. ^ "Labour success for Nandy". Wigan Today. 30 April 2015. Archived from the original on 3 May 2015. Retrieved 30 April 2015. 

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Neil Turner
Member of Parliament
for Wigan

2010–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Caroline Flint
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
2015–2016
Succeeded by
Barry Gardiner