List of American universities with Olympic medalist students and alumni

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The list of American universities with Olympic medalist students and alumni shows the number of Olympic medals won by students and alumni of American universities in Olympic Games up through 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics. Many of these athletes did not compete for the United States; the American college sports model, in which post-secondary institutions sponsor a wide range of athletic competitions and provide scholarships and subsidies to athletes with little regard for their origin, has the effect of drawing university-age athletes from all over the world to the United States for both academic and athletic study.[1][2][3][4]

This list considers both summer and winter Olympic games, and only those who actually received Olympic medals are counted. Therefore, the list includes Olympic athletes only and excludes coaches, staff managers and so on.[5][6] In addition, if an athlete attended more than one university, that athlete might show up in the medal count of each university attended.[7] For example, Alma Richards who won the gold medal in the 1912 Stockholm Olympics in the high jump attended BYU prep school (degree), Cornell (degree), University of Southern California (degree) and Stanford.[8] He is listed in the medal count for BYU, Cornell and USC, but Stanford does not include him in its list. Finally, in this list, universities are presented in descending order starting from those with the most Olympic medals.

In the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics, the university with the most Olympic medals in the U.S. was Stanford University (26 medals), followed by the University of Southern California (21 medals), the University of Florida (17 medals), UCLA (16 medals) and UC Berkeley (16 medals).[9][10][11][12]

Top 10[edit]

Rank University State NCAA 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total Tokyo 2020 Beijing 2022 References
1 University of Southern California California Div I 153 96 77 326 21 [13][9][14]
2 Stanford University California Div I 153 81 68 302[a] 26 [15][8][16][17][18]
3 University of California, Los Angeles California Div I 136 71 63 270[b] 16 [19][12]
4 University of California, Berkeley California Div I 121 56 46 223 16 [11]
5 University of Texas Texas Div I 88 42 25 155[c] 11[d] [20][21]
6 University of Michigan Michigan Div I 71 44 40 155[e] 11 [22][23]
7 University of Florida Florida Div I 69 38 36 143 17 [24][10]
8 Ohio State University Ohio Div I 52 40 26 118 4 [25][26][27]
9 Yale University Connecticut Div I 52 26 32 110 3 [28][29][30]
10 Harvard University Massachusetts Div I 46 42 22 110[f] 2[g] [31]

11th - 50th[edit]

Rank University State NCAA 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total Tokyo 2020 Beijing 2022 References
11 Indiana University Bloomington Indiana Div I 51 21 23 95 8 [h][32][33]
12 University of Washington Washington Div I 40 20 21 81 8 [34]
13 University of Arizona Arizona Div I 37 27 15 79 5 [i][35][36][37][38]
14 University of Minnesota Minnesota Div I 26 32 18 76[j] 3 [39]
15 University of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Div I 26 28 22 76 0 [40]
16 University of Georgia Georgia Div I 30 20 20 70 11 [41][42]
17 Princeton University New Jersey Div I 20 24 26 70 3 [43]
18 University of Tennessee Tennessee Div I 41 15 12 68 5 [44][45]
19 Cornell University New York Div I 28 24 11 63 2 [46]
20 Arizona State University Arizona Div I 25 12 23 60 0 [47][48]
21 Auburn University Alabama Div I 22 ? ? 60 6 [49][50][51]
22 University of Wisconsin–Madison Wisconsin Div I 15 25 13 53[k] ? [52][53]
23 University of Nebraska–Lincoln Nebraska Div I 15 13 25 53 3 [54] Full list
24 UNC Chapel Hill North Carolina Div I 35 8 8 51 3 [55]
25 Dartmouth College New Hampshire Div I 20 20 10 50 0 [56]
26 Pennsylvania State University Pennsylvania Div I 11 11 26 48 6 [7][57][58][59][60] Full list
27 CSU Long Beach California Div I 18 14 15 47 0 [61]
28 University of Kansas Kansas Div I 32 ? ? 45 0 [62][63]
29 Louisiana State University Louisiana Div I 24 10 11 45 11 [64]
30 University of Houston Texas Div I 20 13 8 41 0 [65]
31 Boston University Massachusetts Div I 16 17 7 40 0 [66]
32 Northern Michigan University Michigan Div II 6 12 21 39[l] 3 [67][68][69]
33 Columbia University New York Div I 17 12 9 38 0 [70][71]
34 Brown University Rhode Island Div I 12 9 17 38 1 [72][73]
35 University of Virginia Virginia Div I 17 9 9 35 9 [74][75]
36 Brigham Young University Utah Div I 15 17 3 35 0 [76]
37 Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Div I 21 5 8 34 2 [77]
38 UC Irvine California Div I 14 17 2 33 6 [78][79]
39 Michigan State University Michigan Div I 15 12 5 32 1 [80][81][82]
40 University of Notre Dame Indiana Div I 15 3 14 32 8 [83][84]
41 University of Oregon Oregon Div I 13 12 7 32 5 Full list
42 University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Illinois Div I 12 7 13 32 2 [85]
43 Texas A&M University Texas Div I 16 6 6 28 7 [86][87][88]
44 Purdue University Indiana Div I 14 7 6 27[m] 1 [89]
45 University of Miami Florida Div I 9 11 7 27 0 [90][91]
46 University of North Dakota North Dakota Div I 7 12 7 26[n] ? [92][93][94][95]
47 Syracuse University New York Div I 14 8 3 25[o] 0 [96]
48 Northwestern University Illinois Div I 13 6 5 24[p] 2 [97][98][99]
49 University of Arkansas Arkansas Div I 12 8 4 24 2 [100][101][102]
50 University of Oklahoma Oklahoma Div I 13 7 3 23 0 [103]

Other universities (51st- )[edit]

University State NCAA 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total Tokyo 2020 Beijing 2022 References
Oregon State University Oregon Div I 13 4 6 23 1 [104]
Duke University North Carolina Div I 12 7 4 23 4 [105][106]
University of Colorado Boulder Colorado Div I 10 5 7 22 2 [107][108][109]
San Jose State University California Div I 7 7 7 21 2 [110]
Northeastern University Massachusetts Div I 4 8 7 19 1 [111][112]
Santa Clara University California Div I 14 4 0 18[q] ? [113] Full list
University of Alabama Alabama Div I 5 5 7 17 5 [114][115]
Baylor University Texas Div I 12 3 1 16 2 [116]
Georgetown University District of Columbia Div I 5 5 5 15 0 [117][118][119]
UC Santa Barbara California Div I 11 2 2 15 0 [120][79]
University of Connecticut Connecticut Div I 14 [57][121][122][123]
California State University, Northridge California Div I 9 4 1 14 [124]
San Diego State University California Div I 8 3 3 14[r] 2 [125][126][127]
University of South Carolina South Carolina Div I 0 6 7 13 Partial list
University of Kentucky Kentucky Div I 8 3 1 12[s] 12 [128]
Williams College Massachusetts Div III 3 0 9 12 [129]
MIT Massachusetts Div III 3 4 5 12 [130]
West Virginia University West Virginia Div I 7 3 1 11 [131]
Iowa State University Iowa Div I 6 1 4 11 [132]
University of Maryland Maryland Div I 6 2 3 11 [133]
University of Missouri Missouri Div I 4 4 2 10 0 [134]
Texas Tech University Texas Div I 4 4 2 10 [135][136] Full list
UC Davis California Div I 10 0 0 10 0 [79][137]
University of Iowa Iowa Div I 5 1 4 10 1 [138][139]
Washington State University Washington Div I 5 3 1 9 [140]
Florida State University Florida Div I 4 2 3 9 [141][142]
Furman University South Carolina Div I 4 0 4 8 [143][144][145]
University of Chicago Illinois Div III 5 2 1 8 [146][147]
Cal Poly Pomona California Div II 3 1 3 7 [148][149]
New York University New York Div III 1 2 4 7 [150]
University of Cincinnati Ohio Div I 4 2 1 7 [151]
Abilene Christian University Texas Div I 4 2 0 6 [152]
DeVry University - - 1 1 4 6 [153]
Westminster College Utah Div II 0 5 1 6 [135][154][155]
Fordham University New York Div I 3 1 1 5 [156][157][158]
Indiana State University Indiana Div I 3 1 1 5 [159]
University of Idaho Idaho Div I 4 1 0 5 [160][161][162]
University of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania Div I 3 0 2 5[t] [163][164]
Vanderbilt University Tennessee Div I 2 3 0 5 [165][166]
Wake Forest University North Carolina Div I 3 0 2 5 [167]
Middlebury College Vermont Div III 0 4 1 5 [168]
Rice University Texas Div I 1 1 2 4 [169][170][171]
University of Alaska Fairbanks Alaska Div II 2 1 1 4 [172][173]
Boston College Massachusetts Div I 0 3 0 3 [174][175][176]
George Washington University District of Columbia Div I 0 1 2 3 [177]
University of Utah Utah Div I 0 3 0 3 [178]
College of the Holy Cross Massachusetts Div I 1 0 1 2 [179][180]
University of Central Florida Florida Div I 2 0 0 2
California University of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Div II 1 0 1 2 [135][181]
Robert Morris University Pennsylvania Div I 0 2 0 2 [135][182]
University of New Hampshire New Hampshire Div I 0 1 1 2 [135][183][184]
Utah Valley University Utah Div I 0 1 1 2 [185]
Virginia Tech Virginia Div I 0 0 2 2 [186]
University of South Florida Florida Div I 1 0 0 1 [187]
Brandeis University Massachusetts Div III 0 1 0 1 [188][189]
Colorado Technical University Colorado - 0 1 0 1 [190]
Northern Arizona University Arizona Div I 0 0 1 1 [191]
Community College of Rhode Island Rhode Island - 0 0 1 1 [135]
Emerson College Massachusetts Div III 0 0 1 1 [135]
New York Institute of Technology New York Div II 0 0 1 1 [192]
Saddleback College California - 0 0 1 1 [135]
University of Colorado Colorado Springs Colorado Div II 0 0 1 1 [135]
Utah State University Utah Div I 0 1 0 1 [193]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Stanford's count (296=150+79+67) may have overlooked or excluded some medals from the past Summer/Winter Olympics. For fair comparison, some of these medals have been manually added to Stanford's count in this list (with supporting sources): Alma Richards (1 gold), Debi Thomas (1 bronze), Sami Jo Small (2 golds, 1 silver), and John Coyle (1 silver).
  2. ^ The UCLA count has produced inconsistent and conflicting figures in the past few years, some of which included medals "won" by coaches and staff members. The latest UCLA count claims to include student athletes only, and is thus adopted in this list.
  3. ^ University of Texas's current count has overlooked or excluded the medals won by Gabrielle Thomas (1 silver, 1 bronze) at the 2020 Summer Olympics. These medals have been manually added to this list.
  4. ^ University of Texas's current count has overlooked or excluded the medals won by Gabrielle Thomas (1 silver, 1 bronze) at the 2020 Summer Olympics. These medals have been manually added to this list.
  5. ^ This count is fewer than Michigan's count (185=84+47+52) because Michigan's count also includes coaches, staff, etc.
  6. ^ This count is fewer than Harvard's count (116=47+48+21) because Harvard's count also includes coaches, staff, etc. On the other hand, Harvard's current count has not been updated to reflect the medals won by Gabrielle Thomas (1 silver, 1 bronze) at the 2020 Summer Olympics - these medals have been manually added to this list.
  7. ^ Harvard's current count has not been updated to reflect the medals won by Gabrielle Thomas (1 silver, 1 bronze) at the 2020 Summer Olympics - these medals have been manually added to this list.
  8. ^ The two sources provided describe the medals for the entire Indiana University system, while the first source allows to display medals for Indiana University Bloomington only.
  9. ^ The sources from University of Arizona provide conflicting medal counts. The latest sources (2021 & 2016) are used in this list.
  10. ^ This count is fewer than Minnesota's count because Minnesota's count also includes coaches.
  11. ^ This count has not included medalists from 2014 & 2018 Winter Olympics, as well as from 2020 Summer Olympics.
  12. ^ The count is based on the sources that counted Olympic medalists from the Northern Michigan University Olympic Training Center. But in reality an athlete may not be a student at the university.
  13. ^ Purdue's count includes Chris Huffins (bronze medal 2000), who is a coach at Purdue rather than an athlete. He is not included in this list.
  14. ^ This count is likely incomplete.
  15. ^ This count is fewer than Syracuse's count (29=18+8+3) because Syracuse's count also includes coaches.
  16. ^ This count is likely incomplete.
  17. ^ This count is likely incomplete.
  18. ^ This count is likely incomplete. On the other hand, the main source also counted coaches.
  19. ^ This count is likely incomplete.
  20. ^ Total includes only alumni who competed in their respective sport while attending Pitt (i.e. excludes professional school alumni)