List of Amtrak rolling stock

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Amtrak operates a fleet of passenger train rolling stock consisting of predominantly custom-built equipment. The active fleet includes some 240 diesel locomotives, 66 electric locomotives, 1,408 passenger cars and 20 Acela Express high-speed trainsets. Amtrak also operates 196 locomotives and railcars owned wholly by state partners.[1]

Current[edit]

Locomotives[edit]

The GE P42DC is Amtrak's primary road diesel. Here #150 pulls the Cardinal into South Shore, Kentucky in 2006.
Other than Acela Express power cars, the Siemens ACS-64 is Amtrak's only electric locomotive. Here, #606 pulls a train into New London Union Station.

Amtrak operates diesel, electric, and dual-mode (diesel or electric) locomotives. Its electric locomotives are confined to the Northeast Corridor and the Philadelphia to Harrisburg Main Line, dual-mode locomotives are only used in the Empire Corridor between Albany and New York, and the diesel locomotives are used in all other areas across in the United States.

Builder Model Road numbers Active fleet Year Power type Owner Notes
Road power
GE Dash 8-32BWH 500, 503–519 17 1991 Diesel Amtrak 501 & 502 sold to California Department of Transportation and were renumbered 2051 and 2052.
Genesis P40DC 814–818, 821, 822, 824, 830–832, 835, 837 13 1993 15 units rebuilt to P42 specifications and are the only locomotives that remain in service. All others have been retired and are placed in storage, sold to other operators or scrapped.
Genesis P42DC 1–207 182 1996 Amtrak's main road diesel. Various units are out of service due to incidents.
Genesis P32AC-DM 700–717 18 1995 Dual-mode Used on the Empire Corridor between Albany and New York. Operates as a traditional diesel locomotive, except in and around New York Penn Station where it runs entirely on electricity picked up from a third rail system.
Siemens Sprinter ACS-64 600–665, 667–670 67 2014 Electric Amtrak's main road electric locomotives other than the Acela Express power cars. 601 and 627 are heavily damaged after being in separate accidents and are currently out of service.
Charger ALC-42 300–374 0 (75) 2021 Diesel To replace older Genesis locomotives on long-distance services. The first of these locomotives will enter service in 2021, with the order completed in 2024.[2]
State-owned road power
GE Dash 8-32BWH 2051, 2052 2 1991 Diesel Caltrans Ex-Amtrak.
EMD F59PH 1810, 1859, 1869, 1893 4 1988 NCDOT Ex-GO Transit. Rebuilt for NCDOT in 2010.
1871, 1984 2 1990 Ex-GO Transit. Rebuilt for NCDOT in 2016.
F59PHI 1755, 1797 2 1998
2001–2009 9 1994 Caltrans
2010–2015 6 2001
Siemens Charger SC-44 1400–1401, 1403–1408 8 2016 WSDOT WSDOT unit 1402 destroyed in 2017 derailment. Replaced by unit 1408.[3]
2101–2122 22 Caltrans
4601–4633 33 IDOT
Non-Revenue/Switcher Locomotives
EMD SW1 737 1 1941 Diesel Amtrak Ex-Penn Central, built for NYC in 1941.[4]
GE GE 80-ton switcher 1000 1 1951 Ex-USAX.
1100 1 1952
EMD SW1000R 794–796, 798 4 1952 Ex-B&O/MKT/P&LE/SOO.
EMD GP38H-3 520–527 8 1966 Ex-GO Transit GP40TCs, typically used for shop moves
EMD MP15 530–539 10 1970 Ex-P&LE.
EMD SW1500 540, 541 2 1970 Ex-CSX. Acquired in exchange for 2 EMD F40PH engines.
EMD SW1001 569 1 1974 Ex-CSX. Acquired in exchange for 2 EMD F40PH engines.
EMD GP38-3 720–724 5 1976 Ex-CS/CSX/P&LE.
MPI GP15D 570–579 10 2004
MP14B 590 1 2010 Diesel Genset
MP21B 591 1
MP14B 592, 593 2 2013
National Railway Equipment 2GS12B 597, 599 2 2014 Converted from SW1000R.
792, 793 2 2018
Sources:[1][5][6][7]

Trainsets[edit]

An Acela Express at Old Saybrook, Connecticut in 2011.
A Talgo 8 trainset departing Portland Union Station
Builder Model Road numbers In service Year introduced Notes
Bombardier/Alstom Acela Express 2000–2039 40 1999 Power cars; each one is semi-permanently coupled to each end of a trainset.
3200–3559 120 Unpowered trailer cars; six (four business class, one first class and one cafe) per trainset. 20 trainsets in total.
Alstom Avelia Liberty 2100–2155 0 (56) (2021) Not yet in service. Scheduled to begin service in 2021. 56 power cars on order.
3250–3927 0 (252) Not yet in service. Unpowered trailer cars; nine (seven business class, one first class and one cafe) per trainset. 28 trainsets in total.
Talgo Series 8 7110–7911 26 2013 2 trainsets used on Amtrak Cascades. Unpowered; 13 cars per trainset. The 2 trainsets (Mt. Bachelor and Mt. Jefferson) are owned by the Oregon Department of Transportation.
Siemens Mobility Venture TBD 0 (49) (2021) Not yet in service. 7 trainsets (made up of 7 cars semi-permanently coupled with open gangway-style connections) purchased by Caltrans to be used on the San Joaquins corridor.

Future trainsets[edit]

A Siemens Venture car sits outside the Siemens Mobility Factory in Florin, CA. This car is expected to go into service on the Amtrak San Joaquins service in 2021.[needs update]

On January 17, 2013, Amtrak announced that it has entered a collaboration with the California High-Speed Rail Authority to draft up specifications for the standard high speed train set to be used along the Northeast Corridor and replace the original Acela train sets. The joint order was planned to be for 62 trainsets, with 32 earmarked for the NEC, and having a capacity of 400-600 people.[8][9][10] In June 2014, plans for the joint order were abandoned; according to Amtrak, the two companies' requirements were too different to make a joint order economically and operationally feasible.[11] In September 2015, Amtrak selected Alstom as the builder of 28 Acela replacement trainsets and entered into exclusive negotiations with the company, expected to yield a firm contract worth roughly $2.5 billion by the end of the year.[12]

In August 2016, Amtrak approved the contract with Alstom to make 28 new Avelia Liberty train sets to replace the Acela on the Northeast Corridor with delivery by 2021. The new sets will be capable of running at speeds of up to 186 mph but will initially be limited to 160 mph.[13] Amtrak will be upgrading tracks along the corridor to allow these sets to run at that speed. The new trainsets will have more passenger seating and improved interior amenities as compared to the current Acela equipment.[14]

Two additional Talgo 8 trainsets were bought for use in Wisconsin but never operated. After the 2017 Washington train derailment, Amtrak sought to lease the trainsets for the Cascades.[15]

Passenger cars[edit]

A Superliner lounge on the Auto Train.
Amfleet II coaches on the Silver Star.
Some of Amtrak's F40PH locomotives were converted into Non-Powered Control Units (NPCU) and used as cab control and baggage cars (note the roll-up door for loading baggage)

As of late 2018, Amtrak rostered 1,408 passenger cars of various types. These include coaches, lounges, dining cars, sleeping cars, baggage cars and crew/dormitory cars.[1]:48–51

Builder Model Road Numbers In service Year built Notes
Budd Company Metroliner Cab Control Car 9632–9651 15 1967 Former Metroliner electric multiple unit coaches converted to be used as cab control coaches for push-pull operation. Typically used on Keystone Service, Hartford Line and Valley Flyer services.
Budd Company Amfleet I 43346–48196, 81500–82999 457 1975 Coach, Business, Cafe, and split Business/Cafe configurations.
Pullman-Standard Superliner I 31000–38034 243 1979 Bi-level cars. Coach, Coach/Baggage, Sleeper, Diner and Lounge/Cafe configurations.
Budd Company Amfleet II 25000–28024 138 1981 Coach and Lounge ("Diner Lite") configurations.
Budd Company Viewliner (prototype) 8400 1 1987 2 prototype sleepers and 1 prototype diner built. The diner was refurbished and placed into revenue service in October 2011 to test the proposed layout for the Viewliner II diners. One sleeper has been converted into a non-revenue business car (see #10004 American View below), the other sleeper is stored.
Bombardier Horizon 53501–58108 92 1988 Coach, Cafe, and split Business/Cafe configurations.
Bombardier Superliner II 32070–39046 185 1993 Bi-level cars. Coach, Sleeper, Deluxe Sleeper, Diner, Lounge/Cafe, and Transition Sleeper configurations.
Morrison-Knudsen Viewliner I 62000–62049 48 1995 Single-level cars, all configured as sleepers.
Alstom Surfliner 6300–6908 39 2000 Bi-level cars. Amtrak California Pacific Surfliner Coaches.
EMD Non-Powered Control Unit 406, 90200–90413 21 1977/1996 Former F40PH locomotives built in 1977 and starting in 1996 were converted into cab control and baggage cars which Amtrak calls a Non-Powered Control Unit (NPCU).[16] Two units painted in Amtrak Cascades scheme. Three units leased to Caltrans and painted in a heritage scheme. 406 equipped with HEP generator.
Johnstown America Autorack 9200–9279 80 2005 Used on the Auto Train.
CAF Viewliner II 61000–69009 111 (130 ordered) 2015 Cars will be configured as 25 sleepers, 25 diners, 10 baggage/dormitory and 70 baggage cars.[17][18]
State-owned cars
Morrison-Knudsen California Car 8001–8814 66 1996 Bi-level cars. Coach, coach/baggage, cab/coach, and café configurations. Owned by the California Department of Transportation and used on Amtrak California routes.
Alstom Surfliner 6351–6965 22 2002 Bi-level cars. Coach, café/coach business-class, and coach/baggage/cab configurations. Owned by the California Department of Transportation and used on Amtrak California routes.
St. Louis Car Co. / Morrison-Knudsen Comet IB 5001–5014 14 1968 Single-level cars, all configured as coaches. Ex-NJ Transit coaches, rebuilt 2011–2013, and painted in heritage paint scheme. Owned by the California Department of Transportation and used on the San Joaquin route.
St. Louis Car Co. / Pullman-Standard North Carolina Fleet 400001–400205 20 1952–1965 Single-level cars, coach and baggage/lounge/bike/vending configurations. Owned by the North Carolina Department of Transportation and used on Piedmont route.
EMD Non-Powered Control Unit 90253, 90340 2 1977 Former F40PH locomotives built in 1977 and converted into Non-Powered Control Units. Used as cab control car for the Talgo Series VI trainsets on the Amtrak Cascades. Purchased by the Oregon Department of Transportation from Amtrak in 2009.
EMD Non-Powered Control Unit 101–105 5 2019 Former F59PH locomotives converted into Non-Powered Control Units. Used as cab control car on the Piedmont route and do not have a roll-up door for loading baggage. Owned by the North Carolina Department of Transportation.
Siemens Mobility Venture TBD 0 (88) 2021 Not yet in service. Purchased by the states of Illinois, Michigan, and Missouri, collectively called "Amtrak Midwest." Trainsets to be made up of married pairs (two coaches semi-permanently coupled with open gangway-style connections) and 20 individual coaches.

Business cars[edit]

Three of Amtrak's business cars on the back of the Blue Water in 2011: the Pacific Cape, Ocean View, and Beech Grove.
Amtrak's American View business and inspection car

In addition to its regular fleet, Amtrak owns several business and track geometry cars:[19][20]

  • #10001 Beech Grove, an "Amfleet office car"[21] used for official business by the Amtrak president and other VIPs. This unique car has an open observation platform, lounge seating area, dining room, kitchen and 2 sleeping accommodations, as well as has lights, GPS equipment and a camera to inspect tracks for defects. The car was repurposed in 2020 with a LiDAR Laser Measurement System.
  • #10002 Corridor Clipper, an Amfleet I-based track geometry car. It is periodically attached to the end of a diesel or electric revenue-running train or is hauled by a locomotive only. The car has a special pantograph that is used to test and measure overhead lines.
  • #10003, an unnamed Acela-based track geometry car. It is periodically inserted into an Acela Express consist between a power car (locomotive) and the nearest end car, resulting in a train with two power cars and seven intermediate cars rather than the normal six.[22]
  • #10004 American View, a Viewliner-based "inspection car"[23] with rear-facing seats and large glass window at the end of the car that allows passengers to observe the tracks. The car can also be used by maintenance crews to visually inspect the tracks for defects and by the Amtrak president and other executives for official purposes. Originally numbered #2301, the American View is one of the three prototype Viewliner cars and was the last passenger railcar produced by Budd.
  • #10005, an unnamed catenary measurement car. Like car #10002 Corridor Clipper, this car has a special pantograph that is used to test and measure overhead lines.
  • #10020 Pacific Bend, a heritage Pacific-series 10-6 sleeper formally used by Union Pacific, now converted for crew use on special trains. Four roomettes remain for staff use, five roomettes have been converted to storage areas and one has been converted into a shower. The bedrooms have been removed and replaced with a crew lounge.
  • #10021 Pacific Cape, a heritage Pacific-series 10-6 sleeper now converted for crew use on special trains. It is usually used along with the Beech Grove for official business by the Amtrak president and other VIPs.
  • #9800 Metroliner, a former Metroliner electric multiple unit cafe converted to be used as a first class conference car. Primarily used on charter services on the Northeast Corridor. The car is broken up into 3 areas, one end of the car has 12 business class seats in a 2+1 configuration, the middle has a cafe, and the other end has conference areas (a large private conference room with 8 seats around a large table, 2 medium-sized semi-private conference sections with 4 seats around a table and 2 small semi-private conference sections with 2 seats around a table).[24] The car at one time had cab controls that have since been removed.

Future passenger cars[edit]

In July 2010, Amtrak announced an order for 130 single level Viewliner rail cars from CAF USA, with deliveries planned to begin in October 2012.[25] The contract, valued at $298.1 million, was for 55 baggage cars, 25 split baggage/crew dormitory cars, 25 dining cars, and 25 sleeper car.[26] In mid-2014, Amtrak changed 15 of the baggage/dormitory cars to baggage cars.[27] After extensive delays, all 70 baggage cars were delivered by late 2016, with the first diner delivered in November.[28] As of January 2017, the full diner order was slated for delivery by the middle of the year, with the baggage/dormitory and sleeper cars following.[29]

In November 2012, a joint venture led by Sumitomo Corporation and Nippon Sharyo was awarded a contract by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) to build 130 bi-level passengers cars for Midwestern and California service.[30] Under the terms of the contract, which used federal funding, Caltrans would own 42 of the cars for Amtrak California service, while a consortium of Illinois, Michigan, and Missouri would own the remaining 88 for Amtrak service out of Chicago.[30] In August 2014, the states ordered 45 more cars—34 for Midwest service and 11 for California.[27] In mid-2015, a prototype carbody failed a compression test, leading to an indeterminate delay in delivery.[31] As of January 2017, no progress had been made on building the cars, and Caltrans, Illinois, Nippon Sharyo, and the Federal Railroad Administration were in negotiations to extend the September 30, 2017 deadline for spending the federal funding used in the order.[32] Amtrak and Sumitomo would announce later that year of their amended order of 137 Siemens Venture single-level passenger cars to be built by Siemens at their Sacramento plant, with Sumitomo dropping Nippon-Sharyo as the builder. Delivery is slated for 2020–2021.

Private passenger cars[edit]

Although not part of its fleet, private railroad cars may also be hauled by Amtrak trains if suitably certified and equipped with head end power (HEP). Groups such as the American Association for Private Rail Car Owners, Inc., (AAPRCO) represent the interests of car owners in dealing with Amtrak. These private cars may be used by their owners or chartered by individuals for private travel behind scheduled Amtrak trains.[33]

All non-Amtrak cars, including those of the Department of Transportation, receive car numbers in the 800000 series for tracking purposes.[citation needed] In the early years of Amtrak's existence, it required that private cars be marked in the "Pointless Arrow" scheme as the neophyte company worked to stamp out "rainbow" trains with a system paint scheme, but this policy was abandoned as Amtrak matured, allowing car operators to use personalized or heritage schemes.[34]

Former (Amtrak purchased)[edit]

This is a partial listing of locomotives and rolling stock formerly operated by Amtrak. This does not include equipment inherited from private railroads (see #Inherited)

Locomotives[edit]

EMD F40PHR#315 leads the California Zephyr out of Tunnel #17 near Newcastle, California in 1995.
EMD SDP40F#629 with the San Francisco Zephyr in 1978.
GE E60#604 at 30th Street Station in 1997.
Builder Model Road numbers Years of service Power type Notes
Road power
EMD SDP40F 500–649 1973–1987 Diesel Amtrak's first diesel locomotive purchase. Engines were plagued with derailment problems. Most were traded back to EMD and their components used to build F40PHR locomotives. 18 engines were given to Santa Fe in exchange for CF7 switchers. 644 has been preserved and is currently being restored in Boulder City, NV along with F40PHR 231.
GE P30CH 700–724 1975–1991 Diesel Amtrak's first diesel locomotive purchased with an onboard HEP generator, nicknamed "Pooch". Units plagued with mechanical problems. All have been retired in late 1991 and scrapped by late 1992.
EMD F40PH 200–229, 410–415 1976–2003 Diesel After retirement many engines were converted to NPCUs.
EMD F40PHR 230–409 1977–2003 Diesel Built with components from retired SDP40F locomotives. After retirement, many engines were converted to NPCUs. Engines 231, 281 and 307 have been preserved. Engine 406 was converted to a NPCU and painted in the phase 3 paint. Engines 405 and 407 remain on roster, stored.
EMD/Siemens F69PHAC 450–451 1989–1993 Diesel Built for the United States Department of Transportation to test AC locomotive technology. They were loaned to Amtrak and were later returned to EMD.
GE E60 950–975 1974–2003 Electric Units plagued by derailment problems at high speed. Many were sold off, though some remained in use until 2003. 603 (Originally numbered 964) and 958 have been preserved.
Bombardier/Alstom HHP-8 650–664 1999–2014 Electric Suffered from low reliability problems. All locomotives stored; replaced by the Siemens ACS-64. Last ran on November 7, 2014. After retirement, units were renumbered 680–694 to accommodate numbering of ACS-64 units.
EMD/ASEA AEM-7 900–953 1978–2016 Electric All units replaced by the Siemens ACS-64. Final Amtrak run was on June 18, 2016. As of July 2017, all 16 units are stored in various locations. #938 and #929 have been sold to Caltrain. #915 was donated to Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in June 2015. #928 and #942 were moved to the FRA's Transportation Testing Facility Center in Pueblo, Colorado in July 2017. #945 was donated to the Illinois Railway Museum in March 2018
EMD EMD F59PHI 450–470 1998-2019 Diesel Used on Pacific Surfliner and Cascades routes. Sold to Metra The ones for Cascades Service were all sent to Metra in October 2018 and the ones for the Surfliner Service were all sent to Metra in March 2019.
Switchers
ALCO RS-1 44, 46, 47, 59, 62 Diesel
ALCO RS-3 100–144 Diesel
ALCO S-2 746 Diesel Ex-US Army.
EMD SW1 730–736, 738–745 1976 Diesel Built 1947–1950 for the New York Central Railroad. 737 remains in service.
EMD/
ATSF
CF7 575–599 1984–2003 Diesel Ex-ATSF. Acquired in exchange for 18 EMD SDP40F units.
EMD GP7 760–762, 769, 771–784 Diesel
EMD GP9 763–768, 770 Diesel
EMD GP40 650–664 1991–1993 Diesel Leased and later returned.
EMD SSB1200 550–567 1984–2008 Diesel Ex-ATSF. Acquired in exchange for 18 EMD SDP40F units.
EMD SW8 1, 3, 747–750 Diesel
GE 45t 7 Diesel Ex-US Army. Beech Grove Shops switcher.
GE 65t 5, 6 Diesel Ex-US Army. Beech Grove Shops switchers.
Railpower GG20B 599 2006–2008 Diesel Leased and later returned.

Trainsets[edit]

An RTL Turboliner crosses the Seneca River near Savannah, New York in 1984.
Builder Model Road numbers Years of service Power type Notes
ANF Turboliner 58–69 1973–1995 Gas turbine Semi-permanently coupled trainset.
Rohr Turboliner 150–163 1976–2002 Gas turbine Semi-permanently coupled trainset.
Bombardier LRC 38, 39
(power cars)
1980–1982 Diesel Amtrak leased two trainsets but declined an option to buy them and they were later returned to Bombardier.[35]
Talgo Series VI 7100–7905 (52 cars) 1998–2020 Unpowered (locomotive-hauled) 5 trainsets used on Amtrak Cascades, 13 cars per trainset. 2 of the trainsets (Mt. Hood and Mt. Olympus) were owned by Amtrak, and the other 3 (Mt. Adams, Mt. Baker and Mt. Rainier) were owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation. Mt. Adams trainset was destroyed in the 2017 Washington train derailment and the rest of the fleet was retired in 2020 at the recommendation of the NTSB.[36][37]

Former (inherited)[edit]

Locomotives[edit]

EMD E9 "A" and "B" units with the San Joaquin in 1974.
EMD FP7 leading the San Francisco Zephyr in 1975.
PRR GG1 with the Southern Crescent in 1976.
UAC TurboTrain at Transpo '72.
Budd Metroliner in 1972.

Amtrak inherited numerous locomotives from private railroads on its formation in 1971. Most of these were retired by the end of the decade, if not earlier. These locomotives are enumerated below, with their original owners.[38]

Builder Model Road numbers Original owner Years of service Notes
EMD F3A Northern Pacific Railway, via Burlington Northern
EMD F3B 155–156 Northern Pacific Railway, via Burlington Northern 1971-1975
660–665 Burlington Northern
EMD F7A 100–107 Northern Pacific Railway, via Burlington Northern 1971-(at least 1977)
EMD F7B 150–151 Great Northern Railway, via Burlington Northern 1971-(at least 1977)
152–154 Northern Pacific Railway, via Burlington Northern
160–164 Southern Pacific
EMD FP7A 110–123 Southern Pacific 1971-(at least 1975)
EMD E8A 200–210 Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 1971-(at least 1979)
211–212 Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, via Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
213–223 Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railway
224–225 Louisville and Nashville Railroad
226–227 St. Louis–San Francisco Railway, via Louisville and Nashville Railroad
230–231 Fort Worth and Denver Railway, via Seaboard Coast Line Railroad
232–237 Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, via Seaboard Coast Line Railroad
238–245 Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad, via ACL and SCL
246–254 Seaboard Air Line Railroad, via Seaboard Coast Line Railroad
255–276 New York Central Railroad, via Penn Central
277–324 Pennsylvania Railroad, via Penn Central
325–331 Union Pacific Railroad
332–352 Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, via Burlington Northern
436 Illinois Central Railroad
EMD E8B 370–374 Union Pacific Railroad 1971-(at least 1979)
EMD E9A 400–403 Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 1971-1980
404 Seaboard Air Line Railroad, via Seaboard Coast Line Railroad
405–410, 434–435 Milwaukee Road
411–433 Union Pacific Railroad
EMD E9B 446, 453–470 Union Pacific Railroad 1971-1980
450–452, 471–472 Milwaukee Road
EMD FL9 231–242 New Haven Railroad, via Penn Central and Conrail 1971-(At least 1996) Dual-mode.
GE PRR E44
GE PRR GG1 1971-1980

Trainsets and multiple units[edit]

Builder Model Road numbers Original owner Years of service Notes
UAC TurboTrain 50–53 United States Department of Transportation 1971-1976 Gas turbine trainset. Previously operated by New Haven Railroad and Penn Central.
Budd RDC 10–20, 27–29, 36 New Haven Railroad, via Penn Central Diesel multiple unit
30–32, 40–42 Northern Pacific Railway, via Burlington Northern
34 New York Central Railroad, via Penn Central
43 Great Northern Railway, via Burlington Northern
Budd Metroliner 800–830, 850–869, 880–889 Penn Central 1971-1988 Electric multiple unit. 860 has been preserved. Many remain active as de-motored cab cars. Some units still remain stored in Bear, DE shops as of 2015.

Passenger cars[edit]

The Ocean View, Amtrak's former dome car, on the Cardinal in 2011.
Builder Model Road numbers Years of service
Various Baggage cars 1000 series 1971–2017
Budd Company / American Car and Foundry
Pullman Standard / St. Louis Car Company
Sleeping cars 2000 series 1971–2007
Budd Company / American Car and Foundry
Pullman Standard / St. Louis Car Company
Lounge cars 3000 series 1971–2000
Budd Company / American Car and Foundry
Pullman Standard / St. Louis Car Company
Coach cars 4000–7000 series 1971–2002
Budd Company / American Car and Foundry
Pullman Standard / St. Louis Car Company
Dining cars 8000 series 1971–2017
Budd Company / American Car and Foundry
Pullman Standard
Dome cars 9000 series 1971–2019
Budd Company High Level cars 9000 series
39000 series
1971–2018

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Amtrak Five Year Equipment Asset Line Plan" (PDF). Amtrak. January 18, 2019. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  2. ^ "Amtrak to Improve National Network with New Locomotives" (Press release). Amtrak. December 21, 2018.
  3. ^ Lanier, Ryan (2020-07-14). "The WSDOT Blog - Washington State Department of Transportation: An update on Amtrak Cascades as we move through the summer". The WSDOT Blog - Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2020-07-21.
  4. ^ "Amtrak EMD SW1 #737". TrainWeb. November 4, 2014. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  5. ^ "Motive Power Roster". On Track On Line. November 1, 2018. Retrieved November 6, 2018.
  6. ^ Sutton, David Warner and Harry. "On Track On Line - Amtrak Motive Power Roster". on-track-on-line.com. Retrieved 2018-09-28.
  7. ^ "Amtrak By the Numbers: Updates". On Track On Line. May 1, 2020. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  8. ^ "Amtrak" (PDF).
  9. ^ "Amtrak and California join forces on high speed fleet procurement". Railway Gazette.
  10. ^ "Amtrak, CHSRA plan joint HSR gear order". Railway Age. January 14, 2013.
  11. ^ "Amtrak and California abandon joint rolling stock procurement". Railway Gazette. 23 June 2014. Retrieved 23 September 2015.
  12. ^ "Amtrak selects Alstom for Northeast Corridor train contract". Railway Gazette. 23 September 2015. Retrieved 23 September 2015.
  13. ^ "Amtrak orders Alstom trains for Northeast Corridor". International Railway Journal. August 26, 2016.
  14. ^ "The Next generation of Amtrak High Speed trains". Amtrak. 26 August 2016. Retrieved 26 August 2016.
  15. ^ Federal Railroad Administration (February 1, 2018). "Petition for Waiver of Compliance" (PDF). Federal Register. 83 (22): 4728.
  16. ^ Egebrecht, Mark (December 30, 2011). "The "Cabbage,"Amtrak's Recycled F40". Railroad.net. Archived from the original on February 24, 2016. Retrieved September 26, 2013.
  17. ^ "AMTRAK PREVIEWS NEW LONG DISTANCE CARS" (PDF). Amtrak. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 24 October 2013.
  18. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-10-06. Retrieved 2014-10-05.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  19. ^ Warner, David; Simon, Elbert (2011). Amtrak by the Numbers: A Comprehensive Passenger Car and Motive Power Roster, 1971-2011. White River Productions. ISBN 978-1932804126.
  20. ^ Warner, David (November 1, 2018). "On Track On Line - Amtrak Passenger Equipment Roster - Rolling Stock". on-track-on-line.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  21. ^ "AMTK 10001". Archived from the original on 18 February 2015. Retrieved 11 April 2014.
  22. ^ "AMTK10003: Acela Inspection Car". Archived from the original on December 4, 2002. Retrieved September 10, 2010.
  23. ^ "American View (AMTK 10004)". Retrieved 11 April 2014.
  24. ^ "Search Results – 9800". Railpictures.net. Retrieved 11 April 2014.
  25. ^ "Amtrak buying 130 new rail cars". Washington Post. July 23, 2010. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  26. ^ "Rail News - Amtrak awards $298.1 million contract to CAF USA for 130 rail cars". Progressiverailroading.com. 2010-07-26. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  27. ^ a b "Trains News Wire EXCLUSIVE: States add to bilevel order, Amtrak opts for more baggage cars". Trains Magazine. August 11, 2014. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  28. ^ "First Viewliner II diner on the move". Trains Magazine. November 23, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  29. ^ "Hotline #997: Southern Republicans favor Gulf Coast Train Line; Big Boost for Los Angeles Rail Transit; Ski Train Back in Action; NARP Updated On New Single-Level Amtrak Cars; Members Offer Input To FRA Southeastern Rail Study". National Association of Railroad Passengers. January 6, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  30. ^ a b "Illinois Gov. Quinn announces $352 million rail-car contract for high-speed lines". Progressive Railroading. November 20, 2012. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  31. ^ "Nippon Sharyo prototype fails test, workers laid off". Trains Magazine. September 2015. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  32. ^ "UPDATE: Nippon Sharyo lays off 100 more workers in Illinois". Trains Magazine. January 23, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  33. ^ "Guidelines for Private Cars on Amtrak" (PDF). www.amtrak.com. June 21, 2018. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  34. ^ Sanders 2006, p. 94
  35. ^ Simon & Warner 2011, p. 99
  36. ^ Lindblom, Mike (May 22, 2019). "WSDOT to replace its Talgo railcars like those in the 2017 Amtrak crash near DuPont 'as soon as possible'". Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  37. ^ Warner, David (July 1, 2020). "On Track On Line - Amtrak Trainset Roster". on-track-on-line.com. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  38. ^ "All-Time Amtrak Diesel Locomotive Roster as of 8-29-90". August 29, 1990. Retrieved 2011-11-19.

References[edit]

  • Sanders, Craig (2006). Amtrak in the Heartland. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-34705-3.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  • Simon, Elbert; Warner, David C. (2011). Amtrak by the numbers: a comprehensive passenger car and motive power roster, 1971-2011. Kansas City, Missouri: White River Productions. ISBN 978-1-932804-12-6.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  • Soloman, Brian (2017). North American Locomotives (1st ed.). Crestline Books. ISBN 978-0-7858-3533-2.

External links[edit]