List of Apple codenames

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The list of Apple codenames covers the codenames given to products by Apple Inc. during development. The codenames are often used internally only, normally to maintain secrecy of the project. Occasionally a codename may become the released product's name. Most of Apple's codenames from the 1980s and 1990s are provided by the book Apple Confidential 2.0.[1]

Accessories[edit]

Apple TV[edit]

Apple Watch[edit]

Apple A series processors[edit]

Apple A series processors' internal codenames are named after wind and weather patterns.[12]

Computers[edit]

Apple[edit]

Macintosh[edit]

eMac[edit]

  • Northern LightseMac (ATI Graphics)
  • P69eMac
  • Q86JeMac (2005)

iBook[edit]

iMac[edit]

Mac mini[edit]

Mac Pro[edit]

MacBook[edit]

MacBook Air[edit]
MacBook Pro[edit]

PowerBook[edit]

PowerMac[edit]

iPad[edit]

iPhone[edit]

[46]

iPod[edit]

Other[edit]

  • Brick – Apple's aluminum unibody manufacturing process
  • Garta & T288 – An augmented reality device & prototype [47]
  • Luck & Franc – Apple Glasses, an augmented reality device[48]
  • NexusRetail Store Initiative
  • Magnolia – Apple facility including a regenerative thermal oxidizer to reduce pollution[49]
  • TitanApple Car[49]

Software[edit]

Applications[edit]

audioOS[edit]

For use with HomePod

iOS[edit]

The codename convention for iOS are ski resorts.[52][17][55]

Mac OS System[edit]

Mac OS System is often cited as having multiple codenames.

Mac OS and Mac OS Server[edit]

The codename convention for Mac OS 8, 9, and Mac OS X Server 1.0 mostly follow musical terminology.

Mac OS 8 and 9[edit]

Mac OS X[edit]

The public releases of Mac OS X are named after big cats; however, the internal codenames are named after wine varieties.[56]

Mac OS X Server[edit]

macOS[edit]

Public release names for macOS are named after landmarks in California,[61] however the internal codenames naming convention follows after varieties of apples.[56]

tvOS[edit]

watchOS[edit]

  • watchOS often follows the codename convention for beaches.[52][64]
  • Betas - all betas carry the following codenames, succeeded by the word "Seed". For example, watchOS 3.2 beta is known as ElectricSeed.
  • Burrito – Apple Watch sleep tracking (rumored, upcoming)[65]

Technologies[edit]

References[edit]

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