List of Australian Academy Award winners and nominees

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Catherine Martin has won four Academy Awards, more than any other Australian. She has received six nominations in the Best Costume Design and Best Production Design categories.

This list details Australian people working in the film industry who have been nominated for, or won, Academy Awards (also known as Oscars). These awards honour outstanding achievements in theatrically released motion pictures and were first presented by the United States Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) in 1929. As of 2016, a total of 43 awards from 154 nominations have been won by Australians. Additionally, awards for Scientific and Engineering achievements have been given to Australians four times.

Art director and costume designer Catherine Martin has received more awards than any other Australian with four wins from six nominations in the Best Costume Design and Best Production Design categories. Cate Blanchett is the most nominated individual in this list with seven nominations, which resulted in a win for Best Leading Actress and Best Supporting Actress. Peter Weir has received five nominations in the Best Picture, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay categories without a win.

May Robson was the first Australian-born person to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Actress in 1933 for Lady for a Day. In 1942, Ken G. Hall became the first Australian to win an Academy Award for his documentary Kokoda Front Line! in the Best Documentary category. Suzanne Baker was the first Australian woman to win an Oscar, which was given to her in 1977 for Best Animated Short for Leisure. Cate Blanchett was the first Australian actor to win more than one award in the acting categories. Peter Finch was the first actor to be awarded an Oscar posthumously, winning the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in Network in 1976. The only other acting Oscar awarded posthumously was to fellow Australian Heath Ledger 32 years later when his performance in The Dark Knight earned him the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in 2008.

Australians have been nominated at least once in all categories except Best Live Action Short Film. The Oscar for Best Costume Design has been the most successful category for Australians with seven wins from 17 nominations. The Academy Awards for Best Director and Best Documentary (Short Subject) are the only categories in this list where Australians have been nominated without winning.

Nominees and winners[edit]

In the following tables, the years correspond to the year in which the films were released; the Academy Award ceremony is held the following year.

Production[edit]

A male with grey hair is seen standing in front of a white wall with black text. He is wearing a white jacket on top of a white shirt with a black bow tie shirt.
Baz Luhrmann was co-nominated for Best Picture in 2001 for Moulin Rouge! (2001).
A male with grey hair and round black-rimmed glasses is seen standing in front of a blue and white wall. He is wearing a black jacket on top of a white open collared shirt and is smiling.
George Miller won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature in 2006 for Happy Feet (2006).
Emile Sherman was the co-recipient of Best Picture for The King's Speech (2010).
Adam Elliot won Best Animated Short Film for Harvie Krumpet (2003).
Shaun Tan's The Lost Thing (2011) won the Oscar for Best Animated Short film.

Best Picture[edit]

Academy Award for Best Picture
Year Producer(s) Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1993
(66th)
Jan Chapman The Piano Nominated [1]
1995
(68th)
Bruce Davey Braveheart Won Shared with Mel Gibson and Alan Ladd, Jr. [2]
Bill Miller
George Miller
Doug Mitchell
Babe Nominated [3]
1996
(68th)
Jane Scott Shine Nominated [4]
1998
(71st)
Grant Hill The Thin Red Line Nominated Nominated with Robert Geisler and John Roberdeau. [5]
2001
(74th)
Baz Luhrmann
Martin Brown
Moulin Rouge! Nominated [6]
2003
(76th)
Peter Weir Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Nominated Nominated with Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. and Duncan Henderson. [7]
2009
(82nd)
Carolynne Cunningham District 9 Nominated Nominated with Peter Jackson [8]
2010
(83rd)
Emile Sherman The King's Speech Won Shared with Iain Canning. [9]
2011
(84th)
Grant Hill The Tree of Life Nominated Nominated alongside Dede Gardner, Sarah Green and Bill Pohlad. [10]
2015
(88th)
George Miller
Doug Mitchell
Mad Max: Fury Road Nominated [11]
2016
(89th)
Angie Fielder
Emile Sherman
Lion Nominated Shared with Iain Canning. [12]
Bruce Davey Hacksaw Ridge Nominated Shared with Bill Mechanic & David Permut

Best Foreign Language Film[edit]

Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film
Year Director(s) Film Status Notes Ref(s)
2016
(89th)
Martin Butler
Bentley Dean
Tanna Nominated First Australian film to make the final round nominations in this category. [13]

Best Documentary Feature[edit]

Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1942
(15th)
Ken G. Hall Kokoda Front Line! Won Hall was the first Australian to win an Academy Award. One of four winners in this category in 1942, Kokoda Front Line! was the first Australian film to win. [14]
1980
(53rd)
David Bradbury Front Line Nominated [15]
1983
(56th)
Robin Anderson
Bob Connolly
First Contact Nominated [16]
2007
(80th)
Eva Orner Taxi to the Dark Side Won Shared with Alex Gibney. [17]

Best Documentary (Short Subject)[edit]

Academy Award for Best Documentary (Short Subject)
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1947
(20th)
Australian News & Information Bureau School in the Mailbox Nominated [18]
2008
(81st)
Tamara Anghie New Boy Nominated Nominated with Steph Green. [19]

Best Animated Film[edit]

Academy Award for Best Animated Feature
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
2006
(79th)
George Miller Happy Feet Won [20]

Best Animated Short Film[edit]

Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1977
(50th)
Suzanne Baker Leisure Won Baker was the first Australian woman to win an Academy Award. The animation was directed by Australian cartoonist Bruce Petty. [21]
2003
(76th)
Adam Elliot Harvie Krumpet Won It is the first fully tax funded Australian film to win an Academy Award.[22] Elliot has since donated his Oscar to the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI). [23]
2004
(77th)
Sejong Park
Andrew Gregory
Birthday Boy Nominated [24]
2006
(79th)
Anthony Lucas The Mysterious Geographic Explorations of Jasper Morello Nominated [25]
2010
(83rd)
Shaun Tan The Lost Thing Won Shared with Andrew Ruhemann. [26]

Performance[edit]

May Robson was the first Australian-born person to be nominated for an Oscar receiving a nomination for Best Actress for Lady for a Day (1933).
Nicole Kidman has won one out of four acting Oscars, winning Best Actress for The Hours (2002).
Cate Blanchett has been nominated for seven Oscars, more than any other Australian. She won one each for Best Supporting Actress and Best Actress for The Aviator (2004) and Blue Jasmine (2013), respectively.
Peter Finch was the first actor to receive a posthumous Academy Award for Best Actor for Network (1976).
Geoffrey Rush has been nominated twice in both acting categories, winning once for Best Actor for Shine (1996).
Russell Crowe one once from two nominations for Best Actor for Gladiator (2000).
A close-up image of a blond haired man wearing a grey and orange sweater.
Like Finch, Heath Ledger received a posthumous Oscar. He won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for The Dark Knight (2008).

Best Actress[edit]

Academy Award for Best Actress
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1932/33
(6th)
May Robson Lady for a Day Nominated First Australian to be nominated for an Oscar. She is also the oldest Australian nominated for an acting Oscar, at age 75. [27]
1984
(57th)
Judy Davis A Passage to India Nominated [28]
1998
(71st)
Cate Blanchett Elizabeth Nominated [29]
2001
(74th)
Nicole Kidman Moulin Rouge! Nominated Kidman was born in the United States of America. First female nomination for an Australian made production. [30]
2002
(75th)
The Hours Won First Australian to be nominated in this category more than once, and in consecutive years, the first Australian to win Best Actress, and the first win for a female Australian in a Biography. [31]
2003
(76th)
Keisha Castle-Hughes Whale Rider Nominated Australian born, New Zealand actress. [32]
Naomi Watts 21 Grams Nominated British born, Australian actress
2007
(80th)
Cate Blanchett Elizabeth: The Golden Age Nominated This nomination made Blanchett the first actress and fifth overall performer to be nominated in this category for portraying the same character (Elizabeth I of England) in two different films (her other nomination was for Elizabeth (1998)).[33] [34]
2010
(83rd)
Nicole Kidman Rabbit Hole Nominated [35]
2012
(85th)
Naomi Watts The Impossible Nominated [36]
2013
(86th)
Cate Blanchett Blue Jasmine Won [37]
2015
(88th)
Carol Nominated [38]

Best Supporting Actress[edit]

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1940
(13th)
Judith Anderson Rebecca Nominated First Australian to be nominated for Best Supporting Actress. [39]
1963
(36th)
Diane Cilento Tom Jones Nominated [40]
1992
(65th)
Judy Davis Husbands and Wives Nominated First Australian to have received nominations for both Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress. [41]
1998
(71st)
Rachel Griffiths Hilary and Jackie Nominated [29]
1999
(72nd)
Toni Collette The Sixth Sense Nominated [42]
2004
(77th)
Cate Blanchett The Aviator Won First overall performer to win an Oscar for portraying another Oscar winner - Katharine Hepburn.[43] [44]
2006
(79th)
Notes on a Scandal Nominated [45]
2007
(80th)
I'm Not There Nominated Blanchett became the first Australian, and the eleventh overall performer, to receive double acting nominations in the same year (the other for Best Actress for Elizabeth: The Golden Age).[46][47] This performance also made her one of three women to have ever been nominated for a female acting Oscar for portraying a man.[43] [34]
2010
(83rd)
Jacki Weaver Animal Kingdom Nominated [35]
2012
(85th)
Silver Linings Playbook Nominated [48]
2016
(89th)
Nicole Kidman Lion Nominated [49]

Best Actor[edit]

Academy Award for Best Actor
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1971 Peter Finch Sunday Bloody Sunday Nominated [50]
1976 Network Won First actor in Oscars history to win posthumously.[51] First Australian actor to receive a posthumous nomination.[52] [53]
1996 Geoffrey Rush Shine Won First Australian-born person and first living Australian to win an acting Oscar. [54]
1999 Russell Crowe The Insider Nominated Crowe moved from his native New Zealand when he was four years old and currently resides in Australia.[55] [42]
2000 Gladiator Won [56]
Geoffrey Rush Quills Nominated
2001 Russell Crowe A Beautiful Mind Nominated [30]
2005 Heath Ledger Brokeback Mountain Nominated [57]
2012 Hugh Jackman Les Misérables Nominated [48]

Best Supporting Actor[edit]

Academy Award for Best Actor
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1998 Geoffrey Rush Shakespeare in Love Nominated [29]
2008 Heath Ledger The Dark Knight Won First Australian to win in this category. Second person to win an acting Oscar posthumously (the first was fellow Australian Peter Finch).[58] [59]
2010 Geoffrey Rush The King's Speech Nominated [35]

Craft[edit]

Best Cinematography[edit]

Academy Award for Best Cinematography
Year Director(s) Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1950 Robert Krasker The Third Man Won Awarded for black and white cinematography. [60]
1985 John Seale Witness Nominated [61]
1988 Rain Man Nominated [62]
1990 Dean Semler Dances with Wolves Won [63]
1996 John Seale The English Patient Won [64]
2001 Andrew Lesnie The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Won
Donald McAlpine Moulin Rouge! Nominated
2002 Dion Beebe Chicago Nominated Dion Beebe was born in Australia but moved to South Africa at the age of 4.
2003 Russell Boyd Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Won
John Seale Cold Mountain Nominated
2005 Dion Beebe Memoirs of a Geisha Won
2015 John Seale Mad Max: Fury Road Nominated [11]
2016 Greig Fraser Lion Nominated
  • Note 1: Australian film The Piano (1993) was nominated in this category for Stuart Dryburgh, an English-born, New Zealand based cinematographer.[65]

Best Costume Design[edit]

Academy Award for Best Costume Design
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1951 Orry-Kelly An American in Paris Won Best Costume Design (colour). [66]
1957 Les Girls Won [66]
1959 Some Like It Hot Won Best Costume Design (black and white). First Australian to win three Oscars. [66]
1962 Gypsy Nominated Best Costume Design (colour). [66]
1966 Jocelyn Rickards Morgan! Nominated Best Costume Design (black and white).
1968 John Truscott Camelot Won [67]
1980 Anna Senior My Brilliant Career Nominated [68]
1993 Janet Patterson The Piano Nominated [69]
1995 Lizzy Gardiner
Tim Chappel
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Won [70]
1996 Janet Patterson The Portrait of a Lady Nominated [69]
1997 Oscar and Lucinda Nominated [69]
2001 Catherine Martin
Angus Strathie
Moulin Rouge! Won
2003 Wendy Stites Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Nominated
2008 Catherine Martin Australia Nominated
2009 Janet Patterson Bright Star Nominated [69]
2013 Catherine Martin The Great Gatsby Won First Australian to win four Oscars, the most by any Australian. [71]
Michael Wilkinson American Hustle Nominated

Best Director[edit]

Academy Award for Best Director
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1942 John Farrow Wake Island Nominated Farrow ceased to be an Australian citizen in 1947 when he adopted US citizenship. [72]
1983 Bruce Beresford Tender Mercies Nominated [73]
1985 Peter Weir Witness Nominated [74]
1989 Dead Poets Society Nominated [75]
1993 Jane Campion The Piano Nominated Campion was born in New Zealand but resides in Australia.[76]
1995 Chris Noonan Babe Nominated
1996 Scott Hicks Shine Nominated Born in Uganda, moved to Australia at age 14, [54]
1998 Peter Weir The Truman Show Nominated [77]
2003 Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Nominated [77]
2010 Tom Hooper The King's Speech Won Hooper is British-Australian.
2015 George Miller Mad Max: Fury Road Nominated [11]

Best Editing[edit]

Academy Award for Best Film Editing
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1961 Alan Osbiston The Guns of Navarone Nominated Alan Osbiston was an Australian-born British film editor
1993 Veronika Jenet The Piano Nominated [78]
1994 Richard Francis-Bruce The Shawshank Redemption Nominated [79]
1995 Se7en Nominated [80]
Marcus D'Arcy Babe Nominated Nominated with Jay Friedkin. [81]
1996 Pip Karmel Shine Nominated [82]
1997 Richard Francis-Bruce Air Force One Nominated [83]
2001 Jill Bilcock Moulin Rouge! Nominated
2003 Lee Smith Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Nominated
2008 The Dark Knight Nominated
Kirk Baxter The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Nominated Nominated with Angus Wall.
2010 The Social Network Won Shared with Angus Wall.
2011 The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Won Shared with Angus Wall.
First Australian to win Oscars in consecutive years in the same category.
2015 Margaret Sixel Mad Max: Fury Road Won Sixel was born in South Africa [11]

Best Makeup and Hairstyling[edit]

Academy Award for Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Year Name Film Status Notes Refs
1995 Paul Pattison Braveheart Won Award shared with Lois Burwell and Peter Frampton.
2005 Dave Elsey
Nikki Gooley
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith Nominated
2010 Dave Elsey The Wolfman Won Award shared with Rick Baker
2012 Rick Findlater The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Nominated Nominated with Peter King and Tami Lane. [48]
2015 Lesley Vanderwalt
Elka Wardega
Damian Martin
Mad Max: Fury Road Won [11]

Best Music, Original Score[edit]

Academy Award for Best Original Score
Year Composer(s) Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1974 Douglas Gamley The Little Prince Nominated Nominated for Best Music, Scoring Original Song Score and/or Adaptation. Shared nomination with English-born Angela Morley, Austrian-American Frederick Loewe, and American-born Alan Jay Lerner.
1996 David Hirschfelder Shine Nominated Nominated for Best Music, Original Dramatic Score. [54]
1998 Elizabeth Nominated Nominated for Best Music, Original Dramatic Score. [29]

Best Music, Original Song[edit]

Academy Award for Best Original Song
Year Writer(s) Song Film Result Notes Refs
1978 John Farrar "Hopelessly Devoted to You" Grease Nominated
1981 Peter Allen "Arthur's Theme (Best That You Can Do)" Arthur Won Shared with Burt Bacharach, Christopher Cross and Carole Bayer Sager. [84]

Best Production Design[edit]

Note: Before 2012, the category was called Best Art Direction-Set Decoration.

Academy Award for Best Production Design
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1967 John Truscott Camelot Won Shared with Edward Carrere and John W. Brown. [85]
1969 Ken Muggleston Oliver! Won Shared with Vernon Dixon. [86]
1993 Luciana Arrighi Howards End Won Arrighi is an Italian who was born in Brazil and raised in Australia. She was nominated with Ian Whittaker [87]
1995 Roger Ford
Kerrie Brown
Babe Nominated
1996 Catherine Martin Romeo + Juliet Nominated Shared with Brigitte Broch [54]
1999 Luciana Arrighi Anna and the King Nominated Shared with Ian Whittaker [42]
2001 Catherine Martin Moulin Rouge! Won Shared with Brigitte Broch.
2008 Michael Carlin The Duchess Nominated
2013 Catherine Martin
Beverley Dunn
The Great Gatsby Won
2015 Colin Gibson
Lisa Thompson
Mad Max: Fury Road Won [11]

Best Sound Mixing[edit]

Academy Award for Best Sound Mixing
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1998 Paul Brincat The Thin Red Line Nominated Nominated alongside Andy Nelson and Anna Behlmer [29]
1999 David Lee The Matrix Won Shared with John T. Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and David E. Campbell [42]
2001 Roger Savage
Guntis Sics
Moulin Rouge! Nominated Nominated with Andy Nelson and Anna Behlmer.
Gethin Creagh The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring Nominated Creagh was born in New Zealand but is considered Australian.[88] Nominated with Christopher Boyes, Michael Semanick and Hammond Peek.
2014 David Lee Unbroken Nominated Nominated with Jon Taylor and Frank A. Montaño
2015 Ben Osmo Mad Max: Fury Road Won Nominated with Chris Jenkins and Gregg Rudloff [11]
2016 Andy Wright

Robert Mackenzie

Peter Grace

Hacksaw Ridge Won Nominatedwith Kevin O'Connell

Best Sound Editing[edit]

Academy Award for Best Sound Editing
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
2015 David White Mad Max: Fury Road Won Nominated with Mark Mangini [11]
2016 Robert Mackenzie

Andy Wright

Hacksaw Ridge Nominated

Best Visual Effects[edit]

Academy Award for Best Visual Effects
Year Name Film Status Shared with Ref(s)
1995 John Cox Babe Won Scott E. Anderson, Charles Gibson, and Neal Scanlan
1999 Steve Courtley The Matrix Won John Gaeta, Janek Sirrs, and Jon Thum [42]
2001 Ben Snow Pearl Harbor Nominated Eric Brevig, John Frazier and Ed Hirsh
2002 John Cox Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones Nominated Rob Coleman, Pablo Helman and John Knoll
2003 Nathan McGuinness Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Nominated Dan Sudick, Stefen Fangmeier and Robert Stromberg
2008 Ben Snow Iron Man Nominated Shane Mahan, John Nelson and Dan Sudick
2010 Ben Snow

Ged Wright

Iron Man 2 Nominated Janek Sirrs and Dan Sudick
Joe Farrell Hereafter Nominated Michael Owens, Bryan Grill and Stephan Trojansky
2012 David Clayton The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Nominated Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon and R. Christopher White
2013 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Nominated Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon and Eric Reynolds
2015 Andrew Jackson
Dan Oliver
Mad Max: Fury Road Nominated Tom Wood and Andy Williams [11]
2016 Jason Billington Deepwater Horizon Nominated Nominated with Craig Hammack, Jason Snell & Burt Dalton

Best Writing – Adapted Screenplay[edit]

Academy Award for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay)
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1956 John Farrow Around the World in Eighty Days Won Born in Australia but had ceased to be an Australian citizen in 1947 when he adopted US citizenship. Nominated with S. J. Perelman and James Poe. [89]
1980 Jonathan Hardy
David Stevens
Bruce Beresford
Breaker Morant Nominated Jonathan Hardy was born in New Zealand and David Stevens in Israel. [90]
1995 George Miller
Chris Noonan
Babe Nominated
2016 Luke Davies Lion Nominated

Best Writing – Original Screenplay[edit]

Academy Award for Best Writing (Original Screenplay)
Year Name Film Status Notes Ref(s)
1957
(30th)
Ivan Goff Man of a Thousand Faces Nominated Shared with Ralph Wheelwright, R. Wright Campbell and Ben Roberts [91]
1986
(59th)
John Cornell
Paul Hogan
Ken Shadie
"Crocodile" Dundee Nominated [92]
1990 Peter Weir Green Card Nominated [77]
1992 Nick Enright
George Miller
Lorenzo's Oil Nominated [93]
1993 Jane Campion The Piano Won Campion was born in New Zealand but resides in Australia.[76] [94]
1996 Scott Hicks
Jan Sardi
Shine Nominated Hicks was born in Uganda but moved to Australia at age 14.[95] [54]

Scientific and Engineering[edit]

Academy Scientific and Technical Award
Year Name Field Status Notes Ref(s)
1997 Jim Frazier Photography Won Frazier was awarded for the concept. His fellow recipients Iain Neil, Rick Gelbard were involved in the design and development of the Panavision/Frazier Lens System for motion picture photography. [96]
1998 Gary Tregaskis Computer software Won Gary Tregaskis, for the primary design; Dominique Boisvert, Phillip Panzini, Andre LeBlanc for the development and implementation of the Flame and Inferno software. [97]
2001 Bruce Tulloch

Norman Jackson

Development of Digital Audio Dubbing equipment (Fairlight DaD) for film audio dubbing and mixing. Won Bruce Tulloch and Norman Jackson developed a technology used by film dubbing engineers to mix film soundtracks. The product was manufactured by Fairlight ESP Pty Ltd, Sydney Australia.
2003 Michael Carlos
Andrew Cannon
Christopher Alfred
Digital audio editing for motion picture post-production Won Michael Carlos, Andrew Cannon, and Christopher Alfred developed the technology at Fairlight ESP Pty Ltd, Sydney, Australia. [98]
2010 Tony Clark
Alan Rogers
Neil Wilson
Rory McGregor
Software design and continued development of cineSync, a tool for remote collaboration and review of visual effects Won [99]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Further reading