List of Australian government entities

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This is a list of Australian government departments, bureaus and commissions, authorities and corporations.

Government in Australia is delivered by a number of agencies, grouped under areas of portfolio responsibility. Each portfolio is led by a government minister who is a member of the Parliament of Australia, appointed by the Governor-General of Australia as the representative of the Crown. The Governor-General is advised on the appointment of ministers by the Prime Minister, who in turn demonstrates to the Governor-General that he has the confidence of the House.[1]

The agencies are principally grouped as eighteen principal departments, each led by a secretary, director-general, or similarly-titled executive officer and comprising a number of portfolios covering specific policy areas across the department and allocated statutory authorities, trading enterprises, boards, councils and other public bodies. Agencies have varying levels of operational autonomy, and deliver one or more of frontline public services, administrative functions and law enforcement. Some are structured as for-profit corporations. Where there are multiple portfolios within a department, the Secretary may be accountable to a number of ministers.

A government led by the leader of the Liberal Party of Australia, the Hon. Malcolm Turnbull MP in coalition with the Leader of the National Party of Australia, the Hon. Barnaby Joyce MP, was sworn in by the Governor-General on 18 September 2013.[2] The Government changed the structure and portfolios of a number of agencies.[3]

Contents

Department summary[edit]

From September 2013[edit]

The following is a list of government departments that were formed or re-confirmed on 18 September 2013 by way of an Administrative Arrangements Order issued by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Prime Minister Tony Abbott.[4] The Administrative Arrangements Order replaced the previous Order of 14 September 2010 issued by the Governor-General on the recommendation of the Gillard Government.[5][6]

From September 2015[edit]

Following the appointment of Turnbull as Prime Minister, three departments were renamed:[7]

Agriculture portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Attorney-General's portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Communications portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Defence portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Departments[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Education and Training portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Employment portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Environment portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Finance portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Departments[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Foreign Affairs and Trade portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Health portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Immigration and Border Protection portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Industry portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Infrastructure and Regional Development portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Prime Minister and Cabinet portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Indigenous[edit]

Social Services portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

Treasury portfolio[edit]

Ministers[edit]

Department[edit]

Other portfolio bodies[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Infosheet 20 - The Australian system of government". About Parliament: House of Representatives. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 15 July 2016. 
  2. ^ "Abbott government sworn in". news.com.au. 18 September 2013. Retrieved 18 September 2013. 
  3. ^ "Tony Abbott's cabinet and outer ministry". Sydney Morning Herald. 16 September 2013. Retrieved 16 September 2013. 
  4. ^ "Administrative Arrangements Order" (PDF). Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Commonwealth of Australia. 18 September 2013. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "Administrative Arrangements Order" (PDF). Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Commonwealth of Australia. 14 September 2010. 
  6. ^ "Australian Government Directory". Australian Government. Retrieved 23 September 2010. 
  7. ^ Minute Paper for the Executive Council, Executive Council Meeting No. 21 (PDF), Federal Executive Council, 21 September 2015