List of Belarusian submissions for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film

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Belarus has submitted films for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film since 1994. The award is handed out annually by the United States Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to a feature-length motion picture produced outside the United States that contains primarily non-English dialogue.[1] It was not created until the 1956 Academy Awards, in which a competitive Academy Award of Merit, known as the Best Foreign Language Film Award, was created for non-English speaking films, and has been given annually since.[2] As of 2008, two Belarusian films have been submitted for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, and none of them have been nominated for an Academy Award.

Submissions[edit]

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has invited the film industries of various countries to submit their best film for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film since 1956.[2] The Foreign Language Film Award Committee oversees the process and reviews all the submitted films. Following this, they vote via secret ballot to determine the five nominees for the award.[1] Below is a list of the films that have been submitted by Belarus for review by the Academy for the award by year and the respective Academy Awards ceremony.

Year
(Ceremony)
Film title used in nomination Original title Language(s) Director Result
1994
(67th)
Me Ivan, You Abraham Я — Иван, ты — Абрам Yiddish, Polish, Russian, Romani Zauberman, YolandeYolande Zauberman Not Nominated
1996
(69th)
From Hell to Hell Из ада в ад Yiddish, Russian, German Astrakhan, DmitriDmitri Astrakhan Not Nominated

Independent Belarus has only submitted films to the Oscar Foreign Language Film competition twice - in 1994 and 1996. Both films were Jewish-themed films focusing on relations between Polish Jews & Christians, and were set during the time before and after World War II. Me Ivan, You Abraham was about inter-faith friendship among two boys in the 1930s. From Hell to Hell focuses on two families - one Jewish, one Christian - and the tragedy that ensues when one family entrusts their child to the other during the Second World War. Neither film succeeded in being nominated, although Hell was rumored to have come close. Also, neither film was a majority Belarusian production and ironically, neither film was directed by a Belarusian; Zauberman is French and Astrakhan is Russian.

The Soviet Union also sent a Belarusian film, Come and See, in 1985 to represent the USSR.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Rule Thirteen: Special Rules for the Foreign Language Film Award". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2013-08-26. 
  2. ^ a b "History of the Academy Awards - Page 2". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 2008-06-22. Retrieved 2008-08-22. 

External links[edit]