List of Blizzard Entertainment games

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Blizzard Entertainment is an American video game developer and publisher based in Irvine, California. The company was founded in February 1991 under the name Silicon & Synapse by Michael Morhaime, Frank Pearce and Allen Adham. The company initially concentrated on porting other studio's games to computer platforms, as well RPM Racing (1991), a remake of Racing Destruction Set (1985).[1][2] In 1992, however, the company began producing original games for home consoles with The Lost Vikings (1992) and Rock n' Roll Racing (1993), and beginning with Warcraft: Orcs & Humans (1994) it shifted to primarily focus on original computer games. The company was renamed to Blizzard Entertainment in 1994, and in 1996 the company Condor, then developing Diablo (1996), was merged with Blizzard and renamed to Blizzard North; it remained a separate studio for the company until it was closed in 2005.[2]

Blizzard was acquired by distributor Davidson & Associates in 1994, and a chain of acquisitions over the next four years led Blizzard to being a part of Vivendi Games, a subsidiary of Vivendi; when Vivendi Games merged with Activision in 2008 the resulting company was named Activision Blizzard.[2] The name was retained when Activision Blizzard became an independent company in 2013, while Blizzard itself has been an independent subsidiary company throughout.[3][4]

Since the release of Warcraft, Diablo, and StarCraft (1998), Blizzard has focused almost exclusively on the Warcraft, Diablo, and StarCraft series. The sole exception has been the company's latest title, Overwatch (2016). All of Blizzard's games released since 2004 still receive expansions and updates, especially the long-running massively multiplayer online role-playing game World of Warcraft (2004). With over 100 million lifetime accounts as of 2014 and US$9 billion in revenue as of 2017, World of Warcraft is one of the best-selling computer games and highest-grossing video games of all time.[5][6] Blizzard Entertainment has developed 19 games since 1991 as of 2018, in addition to developing 8 ports between 1992 and 1993; 11 of those games are in the Warcraft, Diablo, and StarCraft series.

Games[edit]

As Silicon & Synapse[edit]

Title Details

Original release date:
November 1991[7]
Release years by system:
1991 – Super Nintendo Entertainment System[7]
Notes:

Original release date:
May 4, 1992[9]
Release years by system:
1992 – Sega Genesis, Super Nintendo Entertainment System[9]
1993 – PC (MS-DOS)
1994 – PC (Amiga), Amiga CD32[9][10]
2003 – Game Boy Advance[9]
Notes:

Original release date:
June 4, 1993[11]
Release years by system:
1993 – Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis[11]
2003 – Game Boy Advance[11]
Notes:
  • Racing game
  • Published by Interplay Productions[11]
  • Originally intended to be a sequel to RPM Racing[12]

As Blizzard Entertainment[edit]

Title Details

Original release date:
August 1994[13]
Release years by system:
1994 – Super Nintendo Entertainment System[13]
1995 – Sega Genesis[13]
Notes:

Original release date:
September 1994[14][15]
Release years by system:
1994 – Super Nintendo Entertainment System, PC (MS-DOS)[16]
1995 – 32X[16]
1996 – PC (Mac OS)[16]
2003 – Game Boy Advance[16]
Notes:
  • Cinematic platformer
  • Released as Blackhawk in some European countries[17]
  • Published by Interplay Productions[16]

Original release date:
November 23, 1994[18]
Release years by system:
1994 – PC (MS-DOS)[18]
1996 – PC (Mac OS)[19]
Notes:

Original release date:
April 1995[20]
Release years by system:
1995 – Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis[20]
Notes:

Original release date:
December 9, 1995[18]
Release years by system:
1995 – PC (MS-DOS, Mac OS)[18]
1997 – Sega Saturn, PlayStation[21]
1999 – PC (Windows)[22]
Notes:
  • Real-time strategy game
  • Self-published by Blizzard[18]
  • Part of the Warcraft series
  • Five expansion packs released: Warcraft II: Beyond the Dark Portal (1996) by Cyberlore Studios and Blizzard and published by Blizzard,[23] W!Zone (1996) and W!Zone II: Retribution (1996) developed by Sunstorm Interactive and published by WizardWorks,[24][25] and The Next 70 Levels (1997) and The Next 350 Levels (1997) by Maverick Software[26][27]
  • Warcraft II: Battle Chest (1996),[28] Warcraft II: The Dark Saga (1997),[29] and Warcraft II: Battle.net Edition (1999) include the original game and Dark Portal[22]
  • Included without expansions in the Blizzard's Game of the Year Collection (1998),[30] and with the Dark Portal expansion in Blizzard Anthology (2000)[31] and Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos Exclusive Gift Set (2002) collections[32]

Original release date:
December 31, 1996[33]
Release years by system:
1996 – PC (Windows)[33]
1998 – PC (Mac OS), PlayStation[34]
Notes:

Original release date:
February 27, 1997[40]
Release years by system:
1997 – PC (MS-DOS, Windows), PlayStation, Sega Saturn, Super Nintendo Entertainment System[41]
Notes:
  • Puzzle platform game
  • Developed by Blizzard and Beam Software and published by Blizzard[41]
  • Also titled Lost Vikings 2: Norse by Norsewest or Norse by Norse West: The Return of Lost Vikings in some versions[40][41]

Original release date:
March 31, 1998[42]
Release years by system:
1998 – PC (Windows)[42]
1999 – PC (Mac OS)[42]
2000 – Nintendo 64[43]
Notes:

Original release date:
June 29, 2000[48]
Release years by system:
2000 – PC (Windows, Mac OS)[48]
Notes:
  • Action role-playing game
  • Self-published by Blizzard[48]
  • Part of the Diablo series
  • One expansion pack, Diablo II: Lord of Destruction (2001), developed and published by Blizzard[49]
  • Diablo II Gold Edition (2001) includes the original game and Lord of Destruction[50]
  • Included without expansion in the Diablo II: Gift Pack (2000) collection, and with the expansion in the Diablo: Battle Chest (2001) collection[38][39]

Original release date:
July 3, 2002[18]
Release years by system:
2002 – PC (Windows, Mac OS)[18]
Notes:
  • Real-time strategy game
  • Self-published by Blizzard[18]
  • Part of the Warcraft series
  • One expansion pack, Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne (2003), developed and published by Blizzard[51]
  • Warcraft III: Battle Chest (2003) includes the original game and Frozen Throne[52]
  • Included without expansion in the Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos Exclusive Gift Set (2002) collection[32]

Original release date:
November 23, 2004[53]
Release years by system:
2004 – PC (Windows, macOS)[53]
Notes:

Original release date:
July 27, 2010[63]
Release years by system:
2010 – PC (Windows, macOS)[63]
Notes:

Original release date:
May 15, 2012[71]
Release years by system:
2012 – PC (Windows, macOS)[71]
2013 – PlayStation 3, Xbox 360[71]
2014 – PlayStation 4, Xbox One[71]
2018 – Nintendo Switch[72]
Notes:
  • Action role-playing game
  • Self-published by Blizzard[71]
  • Part of the Diablo series
  • One expansion pack, Diablo III: Reaper of Souls (2014), developed and published by Blizzard[73]
  • Diablo III: Ultimate Evil Edition (2014) includes the original game and Reaper of Souls[74]

Original release date:
March 11, 2014[75]
Release years by system:
2014 – PC (Windows, macOS), iOS, Android[75]
Notes:

Original release date:
June 2, 2015[77]
Release years by system:
2015 – PC (Windows, macOS)[77]
Notes:

Original release date:
May 24, 2016[78]
Release years by system:
2016 – PC (Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One[78]
Notes:
  • First-person shooter
  • Self-published by Blizzard[78]

Original release date:
TBA
Release years by system:
TBA – iOS, Android[79]
Notes:
  • Action role-playing game
  • Developed by Blizzard and NetEase and published by Blizzard[79]
  • Part of the Diablo series

Ports[edit]

Title Original release Port release Platform Ref(s).
Battle Chess 1988 1992 PC (Windows, Commodore 64) [1][80]
Battle Chess II: Chinese Chess 1991 1992 PC (Amiga) [1][80]
J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings, Vol. I 1990 1992 PC (Amiga) [1][80]
Castles 1991 1992 PC (Amiga) [80]
MicroLeague Baseball 1984 1992 PC (Amiga) [80]
Lexi-Cross 1991 1992 PC (Mac OS) [80]
Dvorak on Typing 1992 1992 PC (Mac OS) [80]
Shanghai II: Dragon's Eye 1993 1993 PC (Windows) [1][80]

Cancelled[edit]

Title Cancellation date Developer(s) Ref(s).
Games People Play "Early 1990s" Blizzard [81][82]
Crixa "Mid 1990s" Qualia Games [81][82]
Denizen 1990s Sunsoft [82][83]
Shattered Nations 1996 Blizzard [81][84]
Pax Imperia 2 August 1996[a] THQ [81][82]
Raiko 1998 Flextech [82][86]
Warcraft Adventures: Lord of the Clans 1998 Blizzard [81][82]
Nomad 1999 Blizzard [81][82]
StarCraft: Ghost 2005 Blizzard, Nihilistic Software, Swingin' Ape Studios [81]
Titan 2014[b] Blizzard [81]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ After Pax Imperia 2's cancellation, Heliotrope Studios assumed development of the project, releasing it as Pax Imperia: Eminent Domain in 1997[81][85]
  2. ^ After Titan's cancellation, the development team repurposed many of its assets for Overwatch (2016)[87]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]