List of chief ministers of Karnataka

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Chief Minister of Karnataka
ಕರ್ನಾಟಕದ ಮುಖ್ಯಮಂತ್ರಿ
Seal of Karnataka.svg
Photo of the Chief Minister
Incumbent
B. S. Yediyurappa

since 26 July 2019
StatusHead of Government
AbbreviationCM
Member ofKarnataka Legislative Assembly
Reports toGovernor of Karnataka
ResidenceAnugraha, Kumarakrupa Road, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
AppointerGovernor of Karnataka
Term lengthAt the confidence of the assembly
Chief minister's term is for five years and is subject to no term limits.[1]
Inaugural holderK. Chengalaraya Reddy
Formation25 October 1947 (73 years ago) (1947-10-25)
Deputy
Websitehttps://karnataka.gov.in, https://cmkarnataka.gov.in

The Chief Minister of Karnataka is the chief executive of the Indian state of Karnataka. As per the Constitution of India, the governor is a state's de jure head, but de facto executive authority rests with the chief minister. Following elections to the Karnataka Legislative Assembly, the state's governor usually invites the party (or coalition) with a majority of seats to form the government. The governor appoints the chief minister, whose council of ministers are collectively responsible to the assembly. Given that he has the confidence of the assembly, the chief minister's term is for five years and is subject to no term limits.[1]

Since 1947, twenty-two people have been Chief Minister of Mysore (as the state was known before 1 November 1973) or Karnataka. A majority of them belonged to the Indian National Congress party, including inaugural office-holder K. Chengalaraya Reddy. The longest-serving chief minister, D. Devaraj Urs, held the office for over seven years in the 1970s. The Janata Party's Ramakrishna Hegde has the second-longest tenure, while the Congress's Veerendra Patil had the largest gap between two terms (over eighteen years). One chief minister, H. D. Deve Gowda, went on to become the eleventh Prime Minister of India, while another, B. D. Jatti, served as the country's fifth Vice President. There have been six instances of president's rule in Karnataka, most recently in 2007–08.

The incumbent chief minister is the Bharatiya Janata Party's B. S. Yediyurappa, who was sworn in on 26 July 2019.

Chief ministers of Mysore and Karnataka[edit]

Colour key for parties
No.[a] Name Portarit Constituency /
Representation From
Term[2]
(tenure length)
Assembly[3]
(election)
Party[b]
Chief Minister of Mysore[c]
1 K. Chengalaraya Reddy K. C. Reddy.jpg Mysuru State 25 October 1947
30 March 1952 4 years, 157 days Not established yet Indian National Congress
2 K. Hanumanthaiah Ramanagara 30 March 1952
19 August 1956 4 years, 142 days First Assembly (1952–1957)
(1951–52 election)
continued...
3 Kadidal Manjappa Kadidalmanjappa.webp Theerthahalli 19 August 1956
31 October 1956 73 days
Chief Minister of Mysore (following the state's reorganisation)[d]
4 S. Nijalingappa
Siddavanahalli Nijalingappa stamp (cropped).jpg
Molakalmuru 1 November 1956
16 May 1958 1 year, 197 days ...continued
First Assembly (1952–1957)
(1951–52 election)
Indian National Congress
Second Assembly (1957–1962)
(1957 election)
5 B. D. Jatti
B.D Jatti (cropped).png
Jamkhandi 16 May 1958
9 March 1962 3 years, 297 days
6 S. R. Kanthi
Hungud 14 March 1962
20 June 1962 98 days Third Assembly (1962–1967)
(1962 election)
(4) S. Nijalingappa
Siddavanahalli Nijalingappa stamp (cropped).jpg
Shiggaon 21 June 1962
28 May 1968 5 years, 342 days
Fourth Assembly (1967–1971)
(1967 election)
7 Veerendra Patil Chincholi 29 May 1968
18 March 1971 2 years, 293 days Indian National Congress (O)
Vacant[e]
(President's rule)
Emblem of India.svg
N/A 19 March 1971
20 March 1972 1 year, 1 day Dissolved N/A
Chief Minister of Karnataka[f]
8 D. Devaraj Urs
Hunsur 20 March 1972
31 December 1977 5 years, 286 days Fifth Assembly (1972–1977)
(1972 election)
Indian National Congress
Vacant[e]
(President's rule)
Emblem of India.svg
N/A 31 December 1977
28 February 1978 59 days Dissolved N/A
(8) D. Devaraj Urs
Hunsur 28 February 1978
7 January 1980 1 year, 313 days Sixth Assembly (1978–1983)
(1978 election)
Indian National Congress (I)[g]
9 R. Gundu Rao Gundurayaru.webp Somwarpet 12 January 1980
6 January 1983 2 years, 359 days
10 Ramakrishna Hegde
Kanakpura 10 January 1983
29 December 1984[h] 1 year, 354 days Seventh Assembly (1983–1985)
(1983 election)
Janata Party
Basavanagudi 8 March 1985
13 February 1986[i] 3 years, 155 days Eighth Assembly (1985–1989)
(1985 election)
16 February 1986
10 August 1988
11 S. R. Bommai
Somappa Rayappa Bommai 132.jpg
Hubli Rural 13 August 1988
21 April 1989 281 days
Vacant[e]
(President's rule)
Emblem of India.svg
N/A 21 April 1989
30 November 1989 193 days Dissolved N/A
(7) Veerendra Patil
Chincholi 30 November 1989
10 October 1990 314 days Ninth Assembly (1989–1994)
(1989 election)
Indian National Congress
Vacant[e]
(President's rule)
Emblem of India.svg
N/A 10 October 1990
17 October 1990 7 days N/A
12 S. Bangarappa
Soraba 17 October 1990
19 November 1992 2 years, 33 days Indian National Congress
13 M. Veerappa Moily
A delegation of Central Committee of Communist Party of China calling on the Union Minister for Law & Justice, Dr. M. Veerappa Moily.jpg
Karkala 19 November 1992
11 December 1994 2 years, 22 days
14 H. D. Deve Gowda
H. D. Deve Gowda.jpg
Ramanagara 11 December 1994
31 May 1996 1 year, 172 days Tenth Assembly (1994–1999)
(1994 election)
Janata Dal
15 J. H. Patel
J H Patel became the chief minister of Karnataka when Devwgowda cut short his tenure to become the prime minister of India.jpg Channagiri 31 May 1996
7 October 1999 3 years, 129 days
16 S. M. Krishna
India-eam-krishna (cropped).jpg
Maddur 11 October 1999 28 May 2004
4 years, 230 days Eleventh Assembly (1999–2004)
(1999 election)
Indian National Congress
17 Dharam Singh
Dharam Singh.jpg
Jevargi 28 May 2004
2 February 2006 1 year, 250 days Twelfth Assembly (2004–2007)
(2004 election)
18 H. D. Kumaraswamy
H. D. Kumaraswamy meets union Minister.jpg
Ramanagara 3 February 2006
8 October 2007 1 year, 253 days Janata Dal (Secular)
Vacant[e]
(President's rule)
Emblem of India.svg
N/A 8 October 2007
12 November 2007 35 days N/A
19 B. S. Yediyurappa
The Chief Minister of Karnataka, Shri B.S. Yediyurappa.jpg
Shikaripura 12 November 2007
19 November 2007 7 days Bharatiya Janata Party
Vacant[e]
(President's rule)
Emblem of India.svg
N/A 20 November 2007
29 May 2008 191 days Dissolved N/A
(19) B. S. Yediyurappa
The Chief Minister of Karnataka, Shri B.S. Yediyurappa.jpg
Shikaripura 30 May 2008
4 August 2011 3 years, 66 days Thirteenth Assembly (2008–2013)
(2008 election)
Bharatiya Janata Party
20 D. V. Sadananda Gowda Sadananda Gowda.jpg MLC 5 August 2011
11 July 2012 341 days
21 Jagadish Shettar
Jagadish Shettar.jpg Hubli-Dharwad-Central 12 July 2012
12 May 2013 304 days
22 Siddaramaiah
The Chief Minister of Karnataka, Shri Siddaramaiah calling on the Union Minister for Chemicals and Fertilizers, Shri Ananthkumar, in New Delhi on June 05, 2014 (cropped).jpg
Varuna 13 May 2013
15 May 2018 5 years, 2 days Fourteenth Assembly (2013–2018)
(2013 election)
Indian National Congress
(19) B. S. Yediyurappa
The Chief Minister of Karnataka, Shri B.S. Yediyurappa.jpg
Shikaripura 17 May 2018
23 May 2018 6 days Fifteenth Assembly (2018–2023)
(2018 election)
Bharatiya Janata Party
(18) H. D. Kumaraswamy
H. D. Kumaraswamy meets union Minister.jpg
Channapatna 23 May 2018
23 July 2019 1 year, 61 days

(total 2 years, 314 days)

Janata Dal (Secular)
(19) B. S. Yediyurappa
The Chief Minister of Karnataka, Shri B.S. Yediyurappa.jpg
Shikaripura 26 July 2019
Incumbent 1 year, 325 days Bharatiya Janata Party

Living former chief ministers[edit]

As of 16 June 2021, there are seven living former chief ministers of Karnataka:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Map of south India, with the districts of modern-day Karnataka highlighted
The modern state of Karnataka (within the blue border), as Mysore State has been known as since 1 November 1973, is composed of the erstwhile princely states of Mysore and Coorg, and the Kannada-speaking districts of the erstwhile states of Bombay, Hyderabad and Madras.
Footnotes
  1. ^ A parenthetical number indicates that the incumbent has previously held office.
  2. ^ This column only names the chief minister's party. The state government he headed may have been a complex coalition of several parties and independents; these are not listed here.
  3. ^ Mysore State came into being in August 1947 when Maharaja Jayachamarajendra Wodeyar signed the Instrument of Accession to merge the Princely State of Mysore with the Dominion of India.[4]
  4. ^ On 1 November 1956, via the States Reorganisation Act, Mysore State was significantly expanded along linguistic lines. The Kannada-speaking districts of Bombay, Hyderabad and Madras states, as well as the entirety of Coorg, were added to it.[5]
  5. ^ a b c d e f President's rule may be imposed when the "government in a state is not able to function as per the Constitution", which often happens because no party or coalition has a majority in the assembly. When President's rule is in force in a state, its council of ministers stands dissolved. The office of chief minister thus lies vacant, and the administration is taken over by the governor, who functions on behalf of the central government. At times, the legislative assembly also stands dissolved.[6]
  6. ^ On 1 November 1973, via the Mysore State (Alteration of Name) Act, Mysore State was renamed as Karnataka.[5] Thus, Devaraj Urs was Chief Minister of Mysore between 20 March 1972 and 31 October 1973, and Chief Minister of Karnataka after that.
  7. ^ In mid-1979 Urs split from the Indira Gandhi-led Congress (I), and served the remainder of his term as an Indian National Congress (Urs) member.[7]
  8. ^ According to Frontline magazine, "Following the poor performance of the Janata Party in the 1984 [general] elections (it won only four out of the 28 seats), Hegde resigned on the grounds that his party had lost its popular mandate. Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi allowed him to head a caretaker government. In the 1985 [assembly] elections the Janata Party came to power with a comfortable majority."[8]
  9. ^ According to Frontline, Hegde resigned "in February 1986 when the Karnataka High Court censured his government for the way it handled arrack bottling contracts".[8] He withdrew his resignation after a couple of days, "following pressure from his party legislators".[9]
References
  1. ^ a b Durga Das Basu. Introduction to the Constitution of India. 1960. 20th Edition, 2011 Reprint. pp. 241, 245. LexisNexis Butterworths Wadhwa Nagpur. ISBN 978-81-8038-559-9. Note: although the text talks about Indian state governments in general, it applies for the specific case of Karnataka as well.
  2. ^ Chief Ministers of Karnataka since 1947. Karnataka Legislative Assembly. Archived on 6 December 2016.
  3. ^ Assemblies from 1952. Karnataka Legislative Assembly. Archived on 6 December 2016.
  4. ^ "Corrections and Clarifications". The Hindu. 4 October 2006. Archived on 6 March 2014.
  5. ^ a b M. S. Prabhakara. "New names for old". The Hindu. 24 July 2007.
  6. ^ Amberish K. Diwanji. "A dummy's guide to President's rule". Rediff.com. 15 March 2005. Retrieved on 3 March 2013.
  7. ^ Arul B. Louis et al. "Janata Party and Congress(I) disintegrate into frenzied bout of factionalism and power struggles". India Today. 15 July 1979.
  8. ^ a b Parvathi Menon. "A politician with elan: Ramakrishna Hegde, 1926–2004". Frontline. Volume 21: Issue 03, 31 January – 13 February 2004.
  9. ^ A. Jayaram. "Pillar of anti-Congress movement". The Hindu. 13 January 2004.