List of Chrysler engines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chrysler[edit]

Four cylinder[edit]

1926–1933: Flathead 4

1981–1995: K Engine

1994–2010: PowerTech

2007–present: World Engine

  • 1.8, 2.0, and 2.4 "World Engine" (2007–2017)
  • 2.0 and 2.4 "Tigershark" (2012–present)

Six cylinder[edit]

1924–1959: Flathead 6

1959–2000: Slant-6

1970–1981: Hemi-6 (Australia)

1987–2004: 3.9L/238 LA & Magnum

1989–2011: 3.3 & 3.8 OHV V6

1993–2010: SOHC V6

1998–2010: LH Engine

2002–2013: PowerTech

2010–present: Pentastar

Eight cylinder[edit]

1930–1950: Flathead 8

1951–1958: FirePower (Hemi)

1955–1958: Polyspheric V8

1968–1969: Chrysler Ball-Stud Hemi (A279)[1]

Small block[edit]

1956–1961: A - Chrysler's first small-block V8.

1964–1992: LA

  • 273
  • 318
  • 340
  • 360

1992–2003: Magnum

  • 318
  • 360

1999–2009: PowerTech

2003–present: Hemi

  • 5.7L Hemi - The smallest modern Hemi engine, called the Eagle, introduced in 2002.
  • 6.1L Hemi - A larger modern Hemi, 2004–2010.
  • 6.4L Hemi - A larger bore modern Hemi engine, called the Apache, introduced in 2011.
  • 6.2L Hemi - A supercharged Hemi engine, called the Hellcat, introduced in 2014.
  • 6.2L Hemi - A supercharged Hemi engine, called the Demon, introduced in 2017.[2]

Big block[edit]

A Chrysler 413 cu in (6.8 L) "Sonoramic" engine, factory-equipped with tuned-length twin long-ram intakes

1958 - 1978: B

  • 350
  • 361
  • 383
  • 400

1959–1978: RB

  • 383
  • 413
  • 426 Wedge
  • 440

1964–1971: Hemi

  • 426

V10[edit]

Viper V10 - An evolution of the LA design, executed in aluminium.

Magnum V10 - A similar cast-iron engine was made for Dodge Ram trucks.

Turbine[edit]

1954–1980: Turbine Engine

AMC[edit]

Chrysler acquired a number of engines after acquiring AMC in 1987.

Four cylinder[edit]

Six cylinder[edit]

V8[edit]

  • AMC 360 - American Motors' "GEN-3" V8s were introduced for the 1970 model year in AMC passenger automobiles.[3] The "GEN-3" engines were available in Jeep utility vehicles starting in 1971.[3] It is not the same as Chrysler's 360 V8.[4] Chrysler continued production of the AMC 360 engine after the 1987 buyout of AMC to power the full-size Jeep Wagoneer (SJ) SUV that was produced until 1991.[5] It was one of the last carbureted car/truck engines built in North America.[6] Chrysler never used this engine in any other vehicle.

Cummins[edit]

Six cylinder[edit]

Cummins B-Series[edit]

Mitsubishi[edit]

Three cylinder[edit]

Four cylinder[edit]

Six cylinder[edit]

Mercedes-Benz[edit]

Four cylinder[edit]

  • OM611 - 2.1 L (130 cu in) diesel (2002–2004)
  • OM646 - 2.1 L (130 cu in) diesel (2004–2010)
  • OM651 - 2.1 L (130 cu in) diesel (2011–present)

Five cylinder[edit]

  • OM647 - 2.7 L (160 cu in) diesel

V6[edit]

V12[edit]

VM Motori[edit]

Four cylinder[edit]

Five cylinder[edit]

  • 531 OHV - 3.1 L (190 cu in) diesel

V6[edit]

Fiat[edit]

Three cylinder[edit]

Four cylinder[edit]

PRV (Peugeot, Renault, Volvo)[edit]

V6[edit]

Hyundai[edit]

Four cylinder[edit]

Others[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kirschenbaum, Al. "Mopar Mystery Motor". Hot Rod, 3/86, pp. 71–8.
  2. ^ McGann, John (19 July 2017). "Horsepower: Inside the Dodge Demon's 840HP, 6.2L Hemi". Retrieved 1 August 2020.
  3. ^ a b Sessler, Peter C. (2010). Ultimate American V-8 Engine Data Book (Second ed.). Motorbooks. p. 228. ISBN 9780760336816. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  4. ^ Glad, Douglas (17 December 2007). "AMC 360 Engine Build - 370ci CC/Rambler Engine Makes 480HP - Car Craft Magazine". Hot Rod. Retrieved 24 July 2020. No, it's not a Mopar engine, it's all American Motors
  5. ^ Mitchell, Larry G. (2000). AMC Muscle Cars: Muscle Car Color History. MotorBooks International. p. 28. ISBN 9781610608015. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  6. ^ Jones, Jerrod (12 June 2019). "Don't Ditch That AMC V-8!". Four Wheeler. Retrieved 24 July 2020.
  7. ^ "L630 DOHC". vmmotori.it. Retrieved 17 January 2016.