List of Commonwealth visits made by Queen Elizabeth II

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Overseas trips made by Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth II became Head of the Commonwealth upon the death of her father, King George VI, on 6 February 1952. Since then, she has toured the Commonwealth of Nations and their territories and dependencies widely. She has visited all but two of the most recent member states, Cameroon and Rwanda.

Tours of the British Islands are excluded from the list below.

1950s[edit]

Date Country Host
6 February 1952[1]  Kenya Governor Mitchell
24–25 November 1953[1]  Bermuda Governor Hood
25–27 November 1953[1]  Jamaica Governor Foot
17–19 December 1953[1]  Fiji Governor Garvey
19–20 December 1953[1]  Tonga Queen Sālote Tupou III
23 December 1953 – 30 January 1954[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Norrie
3 February 1954 – 1 April 1954[1]  Australia Governor-General Slim
5 April 1954[1] Straits Settlements Cocos Islands Governor Nicoll
10–21 April 1954[1]  Ceylon Governor-General Ramsbotham
27 April 1954[1]  Aden Governor Hickinbotham
28–30 April 1954[1]  Uganda Governor Cohen
3–7 May 1954[1]  Malta Governor Creasy
10 May 1954[1]  Gibraltar Governor MacMillan
28 January – 16 February 1956[1][2]  Nigeria Governor-General Robertson
12–16 October 1957[1]  Canada Governor General Massey
18 June – 1 August 1959[1]  Canada Governor General Massey

1960s[edit]

Date Country Host
20 January 1961  Cyprus President Makarios III
21 January – 1 February 1961
16–26 February 1961
1–2 March 1961[1]
 India President Prasad
1–16 February 1961[3][4]  Pakistan President Ayub Khan
9–20 November 1961[1]  Ghana President Nkrumah
25 November – 1 December 1961[1]  Sierra Leone Governor-General Dorman
3–5 December 1961[1]  Gambia Governor Windley
30 January – 1 February 1963[1]  Canada Governor General Vanier
2–3 February 1963[1]  Fiji Governor Maddocks
6–18 February 1963[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Fergusson
18 February – 27 March 1963[1]  Australia Governor-General Sidney
5–13 October 1964[1]  Canada Governor General Vanier
1 February 1966[1]  Canada (refueling) Governor General Vanier
1 February 1966[1]  Barbados Governor Stow
4–5 February 1966[1]  British Guiana Governor Luyt
7–10 February 1966[1]  Trinidad and Tobago Governor-General Hochoy
11 February 1966[1]  Grenada Governor Turbott
13 February 1966[1]  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Administrator Graham
14–15 February 1966[1]  Barbados Governor Stow
16 February 1966[1]  Saint Lucia Administrator Bryan
18 February 1966[1]  Dominica Administrator Guy
19 February 1966[1]  Montserrat Administrator Gibbs
20 February 1966[1] Antigua and Barbuda Antigua Administrator Rose
22 February 1966[1]  Saint Christopher-Nevis-Anguilla Administrator Howard
23 February 1966[1]  British Virgin Islands Administrator Staveley
25 February 1966[1]  Turks and Caicos Islands Roger Tutt
27–28 February 1966[1]  Bahamas Governor Grey
3–6 March 1966[1]  Jamaica Governor-General Campbell
29 June – 5 July 1967[1]  Canada Governor General Michener
14–17 November 1967[1]  Malta Governor-General Dorman

1970s[edit]

Date Country Host
2–3 March 1970[1]  Canada Governor General Michener
4–5 March 1970[1]  Fiji Governor Foster
7 March 1970[1]  Tonga King Tāufaʻāhau Tupou IV
12–30 March 1970[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Porritt
30 March – 3 May 1970[1]  Australia Governor-General Hasluck
3–4 May 1970[1]  Canada (refueling) Governor General Michener
5–15 July 1970[1]  Canada Governor General Michener
3–12 May 1971[1]  Canada Governor General Michener
18–20 February 1972[1]  Singapore President Sheares
22–26, 28 February 1972[1]  Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Abdul Halim of Kedah
29 February 1972[1]  Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah
29 February 1972[1]  Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Abdul Halim of Kedah
2 March 1972[1]  Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Abdul Halim of Kedah
5 March 1972[1]  Singapore President Sheares
6, 8 March 1972[1]  Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Abdul Halim of Kedah
19–20 March 1972[1]  Seychelles Governor Greatbatch
24–26 March 1972[1]  Mauritius Governor-General Williams
26 March 1972[1]  Kenya President Kenyatta
25 June – 5 July 1973[1]  Canada Governor General Michener
31 July – 4 August 1973[1]  Canada (for 2nd CHOGM) Governor General Michener
15 October 1973[1]  Canada (refueling) Governor General Michener
16–17 October 1973[1]  Fiji Governor-General Cakobau
17–22 October 1973[1]  Australia Governor-General Hasluck
27 January 1974[1]  Canada (refueling) Governor-General Léger
28–29 January 1974[1]  Cook Islands Governor-General Blundell
30 January – 8 February 1974[1]  New Zealand (for 1974 British Commonwealth Games) Governor-General Blundell
11 February 1974[1] Australia Norfolk Island Administrator Pickerd
15–16 February 1974[1]  New Hebrides Resident Commissioner Houssemayne de Boulay
18–21 February 1974[1]  Solomon Islands Governor Luddington
22–27 February 1974[1]  Papua New Guinea High Commissioner Wilson Johnson
27–28 February 1974[1]  Australia Governor-General Hasluck
16–18 February 1975[1]  Bermuda Governor Leather
18–20 February 1975[1]  Barbados Governor-General Scott
20–21 February 1975[1]  Bahamas Governor-General Butler
20–21 February 1975[1]  Bermuda Governor Leather
1 March 1975[1]  Bermuda (refueling) Governor Leather
26–30 April 1975[1]  Jamaica (for 3rd CHOGM) Governor-General Glasspole
4–7 May 1975[1]  Hong Kong Governor MacLehose
13–25 July 1976[1]  Canada (for 1976 Summer Olympics) Governor General Léger
10–11 February 1977[1]  Western Samoa O le Ao o le Malo Malietoa Tanumafili II
14 February 1977[1]  Tonga King Tāufaʻāhau Tupou IV
16–17 February 1977[1]  Fiji Governor-General Cakobau
22 February – 7 March 1977[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Blundell
7–23 March 1977[1]  Australia Governor-General Kerr
23–26 March 1977[1]  Papua New Guinea Governor-General Lokoloko
26–30 March 1977[1]  Australia Governor-General Kerr
14–19 October 1977[1]  Canada Governor-General Léger
19–20 October 1977[1]  Bahamas Governor-General Butler
26 October 1977[1]  British Virgin Islands Governor Wallace
28 October 1977[1]  Antigua and Barbuda Governor Jacobs
31 October – 2 November 1977[1]  Barbados Governor-General Ward
31 October – 2 November 1977[1]  Barbados Governor-General Ward
26 July – 6 August 1978[1]  Canada Governor General Léger
19–22 July 1979[1]  Tanzania President Nyerere
22–25 July 1979[1]  Malawi President Banda
25–27 July 1979[1]  Botswana President Khama
27 July – 4 August 1979[1]  Zambia (for 5th CHOGM) President Kaunda

1980s[edit]

Date Country Host
24–28 May 1980[1]  Australia Governor-General Cowen
26 September – 12 October 1981[1]  Australia (for 6th CHOGM) Governor-General Cowen
12–20 October 1981[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Beattie
20–21 October 1981[1]  Australia Governor-General Cowen
21–25 October 1981[1][5]  Sri Lanka President Jayawardene
21–25 October 1981[1][5]  Canada Governor General Schreyer
5–13 October 1982[1]  Australia Governor-General Stephen
13–14 October 1982[1]  Papua New Guinea Governor-General Lokoloko
18 October 1982[1]  Solomon Islands Governor-General Devesi
21 October 1982[1]  Nauru President DeRoburt
23 October 1982[1]  Kiribati President Tabai
26–27 October 1982[1]  Tuvalu Governor-General Teo
30 October – 1 November 1982[1]  Fiji Governor-General Cakobau
13 February 1983[1]  Bermuda Governor Posnett
13–16 February 1983[1]  Jamaica Governor-General Glasspole
16–17 February 1983[1]  Cayman Islands Governor Lloyd
8–11 March 1983[1]  Canada Governor General Schreyer
9–10 November 1983[1]  Cyprus President Kyprianou
10–14 November 1983[5]  Kenya President Moi
14–17 November 1983[5]  Bangladesh President Chowdhury
17–26 November 1983[5]  India (for 7th CHOGM) President Singh
25–26 March 1984[1]  Cyprus President Kyprianou
24 September – 7 October 1984[1]  Canada Governor General Sauvé
9–11 October 1985[1]  Belize Governor-General Gordon
11–18 October 1985[1]  Bahamas (for 8th CHOGM) Governor-General Cash
20 October 1985[1] The Bahamas Inagua (private)
23 October 1985[1]  Saint Kitts and Nevis Governor-General Arrindell
24 October 1985[1]  Antigua and Barbuda Governor-General Jacobs
25 October 1985[1]  Dominica President Seignoret
26 October 1985[1]  Saint Lucia Governor-General Lewis
27 October 1985[1]  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Governor-General Eustace
28–29 October 1985[1]  Barbados Governor-General Springer
31 October 1985[1]  Grenada Governor-General Scoon
1–3 November 1985[1]  Trinidad and Tobago President Hassanali
22 February – 2 March 1986[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Reeves
2–13 March 1986[1]  Australia Governor-General Stephen
21–23 October 1986[1]  Hong Kong Governor Youde
9–24 October 1987[1]  Canada (for 10th CHOGM) Governor General Sauvé
19 April – 10 May 1988[1]  Australia Governor-General Stephen
8–11 March 1989[1]  Barbados Governor-General Springer
9–11 October 1989[5]  Singapore President Wee
14–17 October 1989[5]  Malaysia (for 11th CHOGM) Yang di-Pertuan Agong Azlan Shah of Perak

1990s[edit]

Date Country Host
1–16 February 1990[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Reeves
27 June – 1 July 1990[1]  Canada Governor General Hnatyshyn
7 October 1991[1]  Kenya (overnight stop) President Moi
8–10 October 1991[5]  Namibia President Nujoma
10–15 October 1991[5]  Zimbabwe (for 12th CHOGM) President Mugabe
18–25 February 1992[1]  Australia Governor-General Hayden
28–30 May 1992[1]  Malta President Tabone
30 June – 2 July 1992[1]  Canada Governor General Hnatyshyn
18–24 October 1993[1]  Cyprus (for 13th CHOGM) President Clerides
18 February 1994[1]  Anguilla Governor Shave
19 February 1994[1]  Dominica President Sorhaindo
19–22 February 1994[1]  Guyana President Jagan
22–24 February 1994[1]  Belize Governor-General Young
26–27 February 1994[1]  Cayman Islands Governor Gore
1–3 March 1994[1]  Jamaica Governor-General Cooke
6–8 March 1994[1]  Bahamas Governor-General Darling
8–10 March 1994[1]  Bermuda Governor Waddington
13–22 August 1994[1]  Canada Governor General Hnatyshyn
19–25 March 1995  South Africa President Mandela
30 October – 11 November 1995[1]  New Zealand (for 14th CHOGM) Governor-General Tizard
23 June – 2 July 1997[1]  Canada Governor General LeBlanc
6–12 October 1997[5]  Pakistan President Leghari
12–18 October 1997[5]  India President Narayanan
17–20 September 1998[5]  Brunei Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah
20–23 September 1998[5]  Malaysia Yang di-Pertuan Agong Jaafar of Negeri Sembilan
7–9 November 1999[1]  Ghana President Rawlings
9–15 November 1999[1]  South Africa (for 16th CHOGM) President Mbeki
15 November 1999[1]  Mozambique President Chissano

2000s[edit]

Date Country Host
17 March – 1 April 2000[1]  Australia Governor-General Deane
18–20 February 2002[1]  Jamaica Governor-General Cooke
22–27 February 2002[1]  New Zealand Governor-General Cartwright
27 February – 3 March 2002[1]  Australia (for 17th CHOGM) Governor-General Hollingworth
4–15 October 2002[1]  Canada Governor General Clarkson
3–6 December 2003[1]  Nigeria (for 18th CHOGM) President Obasanjo
17–25 May 2005[1]  Canada Governor General Clarkson
23–26 November 2005[1]  Malta (for 19th CHOGM) President Fenech Adami
11–16 March 2006[1]  Australia Governor-General Jeffery
16–18 March 2006[1]  Singapore President Nathan
20 November 2007[1]  Malta President Fenech Adami
21–24 November 2007[1]  Uganda (for 20th CHOGM) President Museveni
24–26 November 2009  Bermuda Governor Gozney
26–28 November 2009  Trinidad and Tobago (for 21st CHOGM) President Richards

2010s[edit]

Date Country Host
28 June – 6 July 2010[1]  Canada Governor General Jean
19–29 October 2011[1]  Australia (for 22nd CHOGM) [1] Governor-General Bryce
26–28 November 2015[6]  Malta (for 24th CHOGM) President Coleiro Preca

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq Commonwealth visits since 1952, official website of the British monarchy. Retrieved 4 September 2012
  2. ^ "Queen's 1956 Tour of Nigeria". British Pathé. Retrieved 6 January 2015. 
  3. ^ (12–16 February Former East Pakistan, now Bangladesh)
  4. ^ "Sights and Sounds of History". The Daily Star (Bangladesh). 1 March 2011. Retrieved 11 November 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Outward State visits since 1952, official website of the British monarchy. Retrieved 4 September 2012
  6. ^ http://www.royal.gov.uk/LatestNewsandDiary/Pressreleases/2015/StateVisittoMaltaandCHOGM27October2015.aspx