List of Crash Bandicoot video games

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Crash Bandicoot is a video game series created by Andy Gavin and Jason Rubin.[1] It is published by Activision, Sierra Entertainment, Vivendi Universal Games, Konami, Universal Interactive Studios, and Sony Computer Entertainment, with entries developed by Polarbit, Radical Entertainment, Vicarious Visions, Traveller's Tales, Eurocom, and Naughty Dog. The series debuted in 1996 with the Sony PlayStation video game Crash Bandicoot, premiered in North America on September 9, 1996. Most Crash Bandicoot games have either been platform games or released for Sony consoles and handhelds.

Most of the games in the franchise are platform games, although the series also includes other genres such as racing video games and party games. Each game focuses on the titular protagonist Crash Bandicoot, an anthropomorphic orange bandicoot. It also features a large cast of other characters such as Doctor Neo Cortex, Aku Aku, Coco Bandicoot, Crunch Bandicoot, Doctor N. Gin, and Uka Uka. The latest game in the series is Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy, a remastered collection of the first three games for Microsoft Windows, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

Main series[edit]

Title Details

Original release date(s):[2][3][4]
  • NA: September 9, 1996
  • EU: November 8, 1996
  • JP: December 9, 1996
Release years by system:
1996 – PlayStation
2006 – PlayStation Network[5]
Notes:
  • Developer: Naughty Dog
  • Producer/Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment



Original release date(s):[2][6]
  • NA: October 31, 1997
  • EU: December 5, 1997
  • JP: December 18, 1997
Release years by system:
1997 – PlayStation
2007 – PlayStation Network[7]
Notes:
  • Developer: Naughty Dog
  • Producer/Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment



Original release date(s):[2][8]
  • NA: October 31, 1998
  • EU: December 5, 1998
  • JP: December 17, 1998
Release years by system:
1998 – PlayStation
2007 – PlayStation Network
Notes:
  • Developer: Naughty Dog
  • Producer/Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment



Original release date(s):[9]
  • NA: October 29, 2001
  • EU: November 23, 2001
  • JP: December 20, 2001
Release years by system:
2001 – PlayStation 2
2002 – Xbox, GameCube
2007 – Xbox Originals[10]
Notes:
  • Developer: Traveller's Tales Knutsford Studio and Eurocom Entertainment Software (GameCube)
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing and Konami



Original release date(s):[11]
  • NA: September 28, 2004
  • EU: October 8, 2004
  • JP: December 9, 2004
Release years by system:
2004 – PlayStation 2, Xbox
Notes:
  • Developer: Traveller's Tales Oxford Studio
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Universal Games



Original release date(s):[12]
  • NA: October 4, 2007
  • EU: October 12, 2007
  • AU: October 18, 2007
Release years by system:
2007 – PlayStation 2, Xbox 360, Game Boy Advance, Wii, PlayStation Portable, Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Developer: Radical Entertainment
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Games



Original release date(s):[13]
  • NA: October 7, 2008
  • AU: October 29, 2008
  • EU: October 31, 2008
Release years by system:
2008 – PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable, Xbox 360, Wii, Nintendo DS
Notes:
  • Developer: Radical Entertainment
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Games and Activision


Racing[edit]

Title Details

Original release date(s):[2][14]
  • NA: September 30, 1999
  • EU: October 20, 1999
  • JP: December 16, 1999
Release years by system:
1999 – PlayStation
2007 – PlayStation Network[15]
Notes:
  • Developer: Naughty Dog
  • Producer/Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
  • Notes: The final Crash Bandicoot video game developed by Naughty Dog.



Original release date(s):[16]
  • NA: November 11, 2003
  • EU: November 28, 2003
  • AU: December 4, 2003
  • JP: July 8, 2004
Release years by system:
2003 – PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube, Game Boy Advance
2004 – N-Gage
Notes:
  • Developer Vicarious Visions
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Universal Games and Konami



Original release date(s):[17]
  • NA: October 19, 2005
  • EU: November 4, 2005
  • JP: December 1, 2005
Release years by system:
2005 – PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, PlayStation Portable
Notes:
  • Developer: Radical Entertainment
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Universal Games



Original release date(s):[18]
June 21, 2019
Release years by system:
2019 – PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • Developer: Beenox
  • Producer/Publisher: Activision


Party[edit]

Title Details

Original release date(s):[19]
  • NA: November 6, 2000
  • EU: December 1, 2000
  • JP: December 14, 2000
Release years by system:
2000 – PlayStation
2008 – PlayStation Network
Notes:
  • Developer: Eurocom Entertainment Software and Cerny Games
  • Producer/Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment
  • Notes: The final Crash Bandicoot video game published by Sony Computer Entertainment.



Original release date(s):[20]
  • JP: July 20, 2006
  • NA: October 10, 2006
  • EU: October 27, 2006
  • AU: November 2, 2006
Release years by system:
2006 – Nintendo DS
Notes:


Spin-offs[edit]

Title Details

Original release date(s):[22]
  • NA: February 25, 2002
  • EU: March 15, 2002
  • JP: July 18, 2002
Release years by system:
2002 – Game Boy Advance
Notes:
  • Developer Vicarious Visions
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Universal Interactive Publishing and Konami
  • Notes: Crash Bandicoot XS in Europe



Original release date(s):[23]
  • NA: January 7, 2003
  • EU: March 14, 2003
  • JP: December 4, 2003
Release years by system:
2003 – Game Boy Advance
Notes:
  • Developer Vicarious Visions
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Universal Games



Original release date(s):[24]
  • NA: June 3, 2004
  • EU: June 25, 2004
  • JP: December 9, 2004
Release years by system:
2004 – Game Boy Advance
Notes:
  • Developer Vicarious Visions
  • Publisher/Producer: Vivendi Universal Games
  • Notes: Crash Bandicoot Fusion in Europe



Original release date(s):[25][26]
  • NA: October 16, 2016
  • UK: October 14, 2016
  • AU: October 13, 2016
Release years by system:
2016 – PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U
2017 – Nintendo Switch
Notes:
  • Developer Toys for Bob (Crash-related content by Vicarious Visions)[27][28]
  • Publisher/Producer: Activision
  • Notes: The Crash Edition only available for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4[29]


Mobile[edit]

Title Details

Original release date(s):[30]
  • NA: July 9, 2008
  • EU: June 9, 2008
Release years by system:
2008 – iOS, Zeebo, N-Gage 2.0
Notes:
  • Developer: Polarbit
  • Producer/Publisher: Vivendi Games Mobile and Activision



Original release date(s):[31]
July 30, 2009
Release years by system:
2009 – BlackBerry, Java Micro Edition
Notes:
  • Developer Vivendi Games Mobile
  • Producer/Publisher: Glu Mobile and Activision



Original release date(s):[32]
May 25, 2010
Release years by system:
2010 – iOS
Notes:
  • Developer: Polarbit[33]
  • Producer/Publisher: Activision


Compilations[edit]

Title Details

Original release date(s):[34]
June 30, 2017
Release years by system:
2017 – PlayStation 4
2018 – Microsoft Windows, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
Notes:
  • Developer: Vicarious Visions
  • Producer/Publisher: Activision
  • Notes: The original trilogy—Crash Bandicoot, Cortex Strikes Back, and Warped—remastered from the ground up for the PlayStation 4.[35]


Cancelled games[edit]

Crash Bandicoot Worlds
With the turn of the new millennium, Universal Interactive Studios wanted the series to make the transition from the PlayStation to the sixth generation consoles. Universal was considering Mark Cerny as the designer for the new game (which came to be Crash Bandicoot Worlds), and intended to have it distributed by Sony as a PlayStation 2 exclusive. Details about the game's progress and development are scarce, although Cerny has revealed that the game was to feature open, free-roaming environments, as opposed to the linear structure Crash Bandicoot was known for at the time. Universal was worried about handing the franchise over to a new studio after Naughty Dog's contract expired, which led them to bet on a safer approach of producing a game with similar gameplay mechanics to the previous installments, a decision that resulted in Cerny being ousted from development. By the time the game was overhauled by Traveller's Tales and released in 2001, it was no longer exclusive to the PlayStation 2 due to Universal's new partnership with Konami, and the free-roaming aspect had been abandoned.[36][37]
Crash Nitro Kart (Traveller's Tales)
Following the release of The Wrath of Cortex, Traveller's Tales began working on a new racing game that served as a sequel to Crash Team Racing. This game was to be Crash Nitro Kart, but due to unknown circumstances Vivendi transferred development to Vicarious Visions. Few details have been revealed about Traveller's Tales' original vision, but it is known that the game was intended to mark Nina Cortex's debut in the series.[38]
Crash Bandicoot: Evolution
Traveller's Tales began working on a title called Crash Bandicoot: Evolution. A prototype for Crash Twinsanity, it was set to create a new form of gameplay for the Crash Bandicoot series as it would have utilized a large-scale story with gameplay combining platforming and RPG elements. As a work in progress, it has since become unclear what exactly was intended to be in the game. One of the only solid facts is that a character known as Foofie, an animal that could transform into different shapes, was going to appear. Only a handful of aspects were kept for Twinsanity, such as The Evil Twins as the villains and Crash teaming up with Cortex to defeat them.[39]
Crush Bandicoot
A game concept pitched by Magenta Software in 2004, Crush Bandicoot was intended to introduce Crash's evil twin called Crush, with Cortex being retained as the antagonist. The game was intended to feature zany, open-world sci-fi environments, and Crush would have been able to use a variety of vehicles. At least one playable test environment was created before the project was rejected by Vivendi Universal.[40]
Untitled Krome Studios game
After Crash Twinsanity's release, Krome Studios (known for their work with the Ty the Tasmanian Tiger series) began working on a new Crash Bandicoot title for Vivendi Universal. Since the game was cancelled very early during development, no more than a few pictures and documents were produced, which cannot be publicly released due to legal issues, and all remaining staff were put to work on The Legend of Spyro: A New Beginning.[41]
Cortex Chaos/The All-New Cortex Show
The names of a project started by Traveller's Tales Oxford Studio after the release of Crash Twinsanity. As the name implies, it was intended to star Dr. Cortex, who would have been evicted from the Evil Scientist League because of his fraternising with Crash Bandicoot during the events of Twinsanity. Cortex Chaos never got past the concept stage.[42]
Untitled sequel to Crash Twinsanity
According to Keith Webb, one of the main artists for Crash Twinsanity, there was a plan to develop a sequel to the game. The plot would have centered around Crash getting sucked into various TV programmes (namely a wild west show, an old black-and-white cartoon, a medical drama and a cooking show hosted by Rusty Walrus) by an invention created by Dr. Cortex.[43]
Crash Clash Racing
After developing Crash Twinsanity, Traveller's Tales Oxford Studio began developing another Crash Bandicoot game, a racing title which would have served as a direct sequel to Twinsanity. This game, called Crash Clash Racing, would have involved personalized cars for each character, all with the gimmick of fusing together with another car. It would have been set inside Crash's mind, with the tracks based around his dreams and memories. The project was eventually picked up Radical Entertainment and released as Crash Tag Team Racing, resulting in a product that was substantially different from the original concept.[44]
Crash Tag Team Racing (Nintendo DS)
In 2005, Crash Tag Team Racing was initially planned to be released on the Nintendo DS alongside the other console versions. Due to the console's inferior hardware, this version was not going to be a direct port, but it was going to be as similar to the other versions as possible, and it was being developed by Sensory Sweep. The game was in development for 9 to 10 months before the studio was told by the publisher that it was going to be cancelled, as Mario Kart DS was scheduled to come out at the same time.[45]
Crash Online
Halfway through the year 2006, a small article was published on the Internet, listing several online PC games which were meant to be released by Sierra. Amongst them there was a mysterious project named Crash Online. The game was set for a release in 2007, but a small copy of its logo was in fact the only thing that has ever been revealed. It was probably going to be exclusive to China and would have required players to pay a fee for each play session. The game can be classified as vaporware, given that it was never publicly cancelled.[46]
Untitled Toys for Bob game
Sometime in 2008, Toys for Bob created a pitch for a new Crash game which was ultimately rejected.[47]
Crash Landed/I Am Crash Bandicoot
Following Mind Over Mutant, Radical Entertainment started working on their next game, which was titled during various stages as either Crash Landed or I Am Crash Bandicoot. Development began on Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, and it was intended to be ported for Wii afterwards. A DS version was also being planned, but no team was ever decided for its development. Renegade Kid was one of the few contenders, going as far as producing a playable demo as their pitch. The game was a scrapped reboot of the franchise, and would have provided a new origin story for Crash, marking the beginning of a series of new adventures. After being mutated by Cortex, he would have gotten entangled with the task of rescuing his fellow bandicoots.[48] Due to layoffs on February 11, 2010,[49][50] after Activision heard rumors that Sony Computer Entertainment had plans to acquire the rights to publish the franchise, it was abandoned in favor of Prototype 2.
Crash Team Racing (2010)
Crash Landed was being accompanied by a directly related spin-off, a racing game with the likely provisory name of Crash Team Racing (not to be confused with the 1999 game), that was being developed concurrently by High Impact Games. Cancelled on February 11, 2010 due to layoffs after Activision heard rumors that Sony Computer Entertainment had plans to acquire the rights to publish the franchise, it was initially slated for release on the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii. It would have featured several playable characters as usual, but only Crash, Dingodile, Polar and a new character simply called Land Shark were finished before cancellation. The project was eventually retooled into DreamWorks Super Star Kartz.[51]
Untitled Vicarious Visions game
In late 2012, a single concept picture featuring Crash with a new design was leaked on the Internet. It came from a photo taken inside Vicarious Visions' studio.[52] Although it was later revealed that the poster was from a cancelled Crash Bandicoot game, any details about the game itself are still unknown.[53]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gavin, Andy (February 2, 2011). "Making Crash Bandicoot". All Things Andy Gavin. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d "Naughty Dog - 30 Year Timeline". Naughty Dog. Sony Computer Entertainment. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  3. ^ "Checkpoint: Events and Software Releases". Computer and Video Games. No. 180. United Kingdom: EMAP. November 1996. p. 49.
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  6. ^ "Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back Release Information for PlayStation". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  7. ^ "Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back - PlayStation 3". GameSpy. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  8. ^ "Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped Release Information for PlayStation". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  9. ^ "Crash Bandicoot: The Wrath of Cortex Release Information for PlayStation 2". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  10. ^ "Crash Bandicoot: Wrath of Cortex". Xbox.com. Microsoft. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  11. ^ "Crash Twinsanity Release Information for PlayStation 2". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  12. ^ "Crash of the Titans Release Information for PlayStation 2". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  13. ^ "Crash: Mind Over Mutant Release Information for PlayStation 2". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  14. ^ "Crash Team Racing Release Information for PlayStation". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
  15. ^ "Crash Team Racing - PlayStation 3". GameSpy. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
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  17. ^ "Crash Tag Team Racing Release Information for PlayStation 2". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
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  21. ^ 「クラッシュ・バンディクー」3作をリマスターした「クラッシュ・バンディクー ブッとび3段もり!」が8月3日に発売。予約受付が開始. 4Gamer.net (in Japanese). Aetas Inc. June 6, 2017. Retrieved July 10, 2017.
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  24. ^ "Crash Bandicoot Purple: Ripto's Rampage Release Information for Game Boy Advance". GameFAQs. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  25. ^ "Skylanders Imaginators". GameSpot. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
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  28. ^ Rodriguez, David A. (June 13, 2016). "Skylanders Imaginators: Crashing Into Skylands". PlayStation.Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  29. ^ "Skylanders Imaginators Special Editions FAQ". Activision. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
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  35. ^ "Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy". Activision. Retrieved July 6, 2017.
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  41. ^ "Krome Studios pitch". Crash Mania. Retrieved October 31, 2016.
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