List of Dallas Cowboys seasons

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This article is a list of seasons of the Dallas Cowboys American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Cowboys' franchise from 1960 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Cowboys franchise was founded in 1960 as an expansion team.[1] The team has earned 33 postseason appearances, most in the NFL, the longest consecutive streak of winning seasons with 20, the second-most appearances in the NFC Championship Game (14, behind the San Francisco 49ers' 15) and the second-most Super Bowl appearances (Tied at 8 with the Denver Broncos and Steelers). The Cowboys have played for 10 NFL Championships and have won 5, all five being Super Bowls.[2]

The Cowboys won Super Bowls VI, XII, XXVII, XXVIII and XXX. They also played in and lost Super Bowls V, X, and XIII.[2]

Through Week 4 of the 2020 NFL season, the Cowboys holds the league's all-time best winning percentage (.571) and has made more playoff appearances than any other NFL team (33).[3] !--START OF THE HEADER OF THE MAIN TABLE-->

Seasons[edit]

NFL Champions§ (1920–1969) Super Bowl Champions (1966–present) Conference Champions* Division Champions^ Wild Card Berth#
Season Team League Conference Division Regular season Postseason Results Awards Head coaches
Finish Wins Losses Ties
1960 1960 NFL Western 7th 0 11 1 Tom Landry
1961 1961 NFL Eastern 6th 4 9 1
1962 1962 NFL Eastern 5th 5 8 1
1963 1963 NFL Eastern 5th 4 10 0
1964 1964 NFL Eastern 5th 5 8 1
1965 1965 NFL Eastern 2nd 7 7 0
1966 1966 NFL Eastern* 1st* 10 3 1 Lost NFL Championship Game (Packers) 34–27 Tom Landry (COY)
1967[4] 1967 NFL Eastern* Capitol^ 1st^ 9 5 0 Won Conference playoffs (Browns) 52–14
Lost NFL Championship Game (at Packers) 21–17
1968 1968 NFL Eastern Capitol^ 1st^ 12 2 0 Lost Conference playoffs (at Browns) 31–20
1969 1969 NFL Eastern Capitol^ 1st^ 11 2 1 Lost Conference playoffs (Browns) 38–14 Calvin Hill (OROY)
1970 1970 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^ 10 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Lions) 5–0
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 17–10
Lost Super Bowl V (vs. Colts) 16–13
Chuck Howley (SB MVP)
1971 1971 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^ 11 3 0 Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 20–12
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 14–3
Won Super Bowl VI (1) (vs. Dolphins) 24–3
Roger Staubach (SB MVP)
1972 1972 NFL NFC East 2nd# 10 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (at 49ers) 30–28
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 26–3
1973 1973 NFL NFC East^ 1st^[5] 10 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Rams) 27–16
Lost NFC Championship (Vikings) 27–10
1974 1974 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 6 0
1975 1975 NFL NFC* East 2nd# 10 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 17–14
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 37–7
Lost Super Bowl X (vs. Steelers) 21–17
1976 1976 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 11 3 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 14–12
1977 1977 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^ 12 2 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Bears) 37–7
Won NFC Championship (Vikings) 23–6
Won Super Bowl XII (2) (vs. Broncos) 27–10
Tony Dorsett (OROY)
Harvey Martin (DPOY, SB MVP)
Randy White (SB MVP)
1978[6] 1978 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^[7] 12 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Falcons) 27–20
Won NFC Championship (at Rams) 28–0
Lost Super Bowl XIII (vs. Steelers) 35–31
1979 1979 NFL NFC East^ 1st^[8] 11 5 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (Rams) 21–19
1980 1980 NFL NFC East 2nd#[9] 12 4 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 34–13
Won Divisional playoffs (at Falcons) 30–27
Lost NFC Championship (at Eagles) 20–7
1981 1981 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 12 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Buccaneers) 38–0
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 28–27
1982[10] 1982 NFL NFC 2nd# 6 3 0 Won First Round playoffs (Buccaneers) 30–17
Won Second Round playoffs (Packers) 37–26
Lost NFC Championship (at Redskins) 31–17
1983 1983 NFL NFC East 2nd# 12 4 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (Rams) 24–17
1984 1984 NFL NFC East 4th 9 7 0
1985 1985 NFL NFC East^ 1st^[11] 10 6 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 20–0
1986 1986 NFL NFC East 3rd 7 9 0
1987[12] 1987 NFL NFC East 4th 7 8 0
1988 1988 NFL NFC East 5th 3 13 0
1989 1989 NFL NFC East 5th 1 15 0 Jimmy Johnson
1990 1990 NFL NFC East 4th 7 9 0 Emmitt Smith (OROY)
Jimmy Johnson (COY)
1991 1991 NFL NFC East 2nd#[13] 11 5 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (at Bears) 17–13
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Lions) 38–6
1992 1992 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^ 13 3 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 34–10
Won NFC Championship (at 49ers) 30–20
Won Super Bowl XXVII (3) (vs. Bills) 52–17
Troy Aikman (SB MVP)
1993 1993 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^ 12 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 27–17
Won NFC Championship (49ers) 38–21
Won Super Bowl XXVIII (4) (vs. Bills) 30–13
Emmitt Smith (MVP, SB MVP)
1994 1994 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 12 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Packers) 35–9
Lost NFC Championship (at 49ers) 38–28
Barry Switzer
1995 1995 NFL NFC* East^ 1st^ 12 4 0 Won Divisional playoffs (Eagles) 30–11
Won NFC Championship (Packers) 38–27
Won Super Bowl XXX (5) (vs. Steelers) 27–17
Larry Brown (SB MVP)
1996 1996 NFL NFC East^ 1st^[14] 10 6 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Vikings) 40–15
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Panthers) 26–17
1997 1997 NFL NFC East 4th 6 10 0
1998 1998 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 10 6 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (Cardinals) 20–7 Chan Gailey
1999 1999 NFL NFC East 2nd#[15] 8 8 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Vikings) 27–10
2000 2000 NFL NFC East 4th 5 11 0 Dave Campo
2001 2001 NFL NFC East 5th 5 11 0
2002 2002 NFL NFC East 4th 5 11 0
2003 2003 NFL NFC East 2nd# 10 6 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Panthers) 29–10 Bill Parcells
2004 2004 NFL NFC East 3rd 6 10 0
2005 2005 NFL NFC East 3rd 9 7 0
2006 2006 NFL NFC East 2nd# 9 7 0 Lost Wild Card playoffs (at Seahawks) 21–20
2007 2007 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 13 3 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (Giants) 21–17 Greg Ellis (CBPOY) Wade Phillips
2008 2008 NFL NFC East 3rd 9 7 0
2009 2009 NFL NFC East^ 1st^[16] 11 5 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Eagles) 34–14
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Vikings) 34–3
2010 2010 NFL NFC East 3rd 6 10 0 Wade Phillips (1–7)
Jason Garrett (5–3)
2011 2011 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 8 0 Jason Garrett
2012 2012 NFL NFC East 3rd 8 8 0 Jason Witten (WP MOY)
2013 2013 NFL NFC East 2nd 8 8 0
2014 2014 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 12 4 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Lions) 24–20
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Packers) 26–21
DeMarco Murray (OPOY)
2015 2015 NFL NFC East 4th 4 12 0
2016 2016 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 13 3 0 Lost Divisional playoffs (Packers) 34–31 Dak Prescott (OROY)
Jason Garrett (COY)
2017 2017 NFL NFC East 2nd 9 7 0
2018 2018 NFL NFC East^ 1st^ 10 6 0 Won Wild Card playoffs (Seahawks) 24–22
Lost Divisional playoffs (at Rams) 30–22
2019 2019 NFL NFC East 2nd 8 8 0
Total 520 388 6 All-time regular season record (1960–2019)
35 28 0 All-time postseason record (1960–2019)
555 416 6 All-time regular season and postseason record (1960–2019)
5 NFL Championships, 10 Conference Championships, 23 Divisional Championships

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "1960 Dallas Cowboys". Dallas Cowboys' Official Website. Archived from the original on 2007-12-29. Retrieved 2008-01-12.
  2. ^ a b "Dallas Cowboys' Championship History". NFLTeamHistory.com. Retrieved 2008-01-12.
  3. ^ "Team Encyclopedias and Records". Pro football reference.com. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  4. ^ The 1967 NFL season marks the first season in the league's history where the league was divided into two conferences which were subdivided into two divisions. Up to 1967, the league was either divided into two divisions, two conferences, or neither.
  5. ^ At the end of the 1973 season, the Cowboys and the Redskins finished the season with identical 10–4 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of Washington in the NFC East based on better point differential in head-to-head games.
  6. ^ For the 1978 season, the NFL expanded from a 14-game season to a 16-game season.
  7. ^ At the end of the 1978 season, the Cowboys and the Los Angeles Rams finished the season with identical 12–4 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Los Angeles was the top NFC seed over Dallas based on a better head-to-head record.
  8. ^ At the end of the 1979 season, the Cowboys and the Eagles finished the season with identical 11–5 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of Philadelphia in the NFC East based on a better conference record.
  9. ^ At the end of the 1980 season, the Cowboys and the Eagles finished the season with identical 12–4 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Philadelphia finished ahead of Dallas in the NFC East based on better net points in division games.
  10. ^ The 1982 NFL season was shortened from 16 games per team to 9 games because of a players' strike. The NFL adopted a special 16-team playoff tournament; eight teams from each conference were seeded 1–8, and division standings were ignored.
  11. ^ At the end of the 1985 season, the Cowboys, Redskins, and the Giants finished the season with identical 10–6 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of New York and Washington based on a better head-to-head record.
  12. ^ The 1987 NFL season was shortened from 16 games per team to 15 games because of a players' strike. Games to be played during the third week of the season were canceled, and replacement players were used to play games from weeks 4 through 6.
  13. ^ At the end of the 1991 season, the Cowboys and the Bears finished the season with identical 11–5 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Chicago was the first NFC Wild Card based on better conference record than Dallas.
  14. ^ At the end of the 1996 season, the Cowboys and the Eagles finished the season with identical 10–6 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of Philadelphia in the NFC East based on better record against common opponents.
  15. ^ At the end of the 1999 season, the Cowboys, Detroit Lions|Lions, and the Panthers finished the season with identical 8–8 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas was the second NFC Wild Card based on a better record than Detroit against common opponents and a better conference record than Carolina.
  16. ^ At the end of the 2009 season, the Cowboys and the Eagles finished with identical 11–5 records. Using the NFL's tie-breaking procedures, Dallas finished ahead of Philadelphia in the NFC East based on better head-to-head record.

References[edit]