List of Doctor Who planets

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This is a list of planets, fictional or otherwise, that are mentioned in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who and its spinoff literature, audio plays, television series and comics.


A[edit]

  • Abydos is a planet mentioned in The Leisure Hive.[1]
  • Adipose 3 is the lost breeding planet of the Adipose.[2] In "The Stolen Earth", Davros is revealed to be responsible for its disappearance.[3] The planet is returned to its rightful place in "Journey's End".[4]
  • Agora is the homeworld of the Sixth Doctor's companion Grant Markham. In 2191, the Cybermen attempted to convert the planet into a Cybermen breeding ground to rebuild their race in the Virgin Missing Adventures book, Killing Ground.[5]
  • Alfava Metraxis[6] is the seventh planet in the Dundra System in the Garn Belt, and was once home to the extinct Aplans. It was terraformed in the 49th century and colonised by humans sometime before the 51st century. It is home to more than one "maze of the dead", mass tombs where the dead are supposedly buried in the walls and represented with statues. However, all of the statues are revealed to be Weeping Angels. The Eleventh Doctor, Amy and River Song landed on this planet in the 51st century in "The Time of Angels" after following the path of the spaceship, Byzantium. Alfalfa Metraxis has 11 hour days.[6][7]
  • Algol is a planet mentioned in Destiny of the Daleks.[8]
  • Alpha Canis One, also called Canis Major, is the home planet of the Canisians, a war-mongering race encountered in Death Comes to Time.[9]
  • Althrace is the name of both a star system and its primary planet, visited by the Fifth Doctor in the Doctor Who Monthly comic strip, "The Tides of Time". The planets of the system were bolted together around a white hole. The system was home to a race of Higher Evolutionaries, and to the demon Melanicus.[10]
  • Alvega is the closest planet to Skaro, inhabited by the vegetable race the Amaryll. When the Daleks invaded the planet, they were defeated by the Amaryll Controller who controlled all Amaryll on the planet in the TV Century 21 comic The Amaryll Challenge.[11]
  • Alzarius is Adric's homeworld, located in E-Space. It appeared in the serial Full Circle. Its galactic coordinates are identical to those of Gallifrey—except they were negative.[12] Alzarius is covered in lush, dense forests and marshlands. Every 50 years, the planet is dragged further away from its sun by a larger planet, causing a phenomenon known as "Mistfall".[13][14]
  • Amanopia is the homeworld of a race blue humanoids that trade body parts and of an enemy known as Sou Til. It is mentioned in a special Doctor Who scene on Tonight's the Night.[citation needed]
  • Anagonia is a planet mentioned in the Seventh Doctor story The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Anathema is the homeworld of the Eighth Doctor's companion Compassion.[citation needed]
  • Androzani Major and Androzani Minor are a pair of planets that form the setting of the serial The Caves of Androzani. Androzani Minor features a network of caves, inhabited by spectrox-producing giant bats. When the planet moved closer to Androzani Major, mud burst from Androzani Minor's core. The planets are located in the Sirius system. Both planets were once covered by water but have become hot and arid desert planets. Native life on Androzani Minor includes the Magma Beast, which lives in Androzani Minor's bubbling mud pools.[16][17] Androzani Major was also named as the place which the Harvest Rangers were from in the 2011 Christmas special, "The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe".[18][19]
  • Aneth, home of the Anethans, was forced to pay tribute to the planet Skonnos in the Fourth Doctor story The Horns of Nimon.[20]
  • Anima Persis is a geo-psychic world, inhabited by the psychic ghosts of its long-dead inhabitants; it was visited by the Doctor in Death Comes to Time. The planet is completely sterile and barren due to wars on the planet long ago.[9]
  • Anura is a planet almost entirely covered in water, home to an amphibian race.[21]
  • Apalapucia[22] is a paradise planet visited by the Eleventh Doctor, Amy Pond and Rory Williams in "The Girl Who Waited". According to the Doctor, the planet was voted Number 2 in the Top Ten Destinations for the Discerning Intergalactic Traveller, and boasts soaring spires, silver colonnades and the mirrored Glasmir mountains. The planet had a pinkish-purple sky and an oxygen-rich atmosphere. Upon arrival, however, the travellers find the planet quarantined, following an outbreak of the contagious alien disease Chen7.[22][23]
  • Aractus is a planet mentioned in Wooden Heart.[24]
  • Arcadia is a planet colonised by humans in the 25th century, and the setting of the Virgin New Adventures novel Deceit.[25] In the Torchwood episode "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang", part of the plot revolves around Captain Jack Harkness's former partner Captain John Hart's search for an Arcadian diamond.[26] The Mayflower, a colony ship seen in the Doctor Who Monthly comic strip "Profits of Doom", was headed to settle Arcadia.[27] In "Vincent and the Doctor", Amy Pond mentions that the Doctor had taken her to visit Arcadia.[28] It is not confirmed whether these instances all refer to the same planet. None of these, however, are the location of the Fall of Arcadia from the Time War, which refers to a city on the planet Gallifrey.[29][30][31][32]
  • Arcateen V is a planet mentioned in The Sarah Jane Adventures story "Invasion of the Bane".[33] It is the home planet of the Butterfly People,[34] which include a "star poet" associate of Sarah Jane Smith,[33] and a criminal called Mary in the Torchwood episode "Greeks Bearing Gifts".[35]
  • Archetryx is the home planet of a time-active race, visited in the audio drama The Apocalypse Element,[36] and mentioned in other Doctor Who audio dramas.[vague][citation needed]
  • Arden, the home of the Shenn, is the setting for the Virgin Missing Adventures book Shadowmind.[37]
  • Arfeliosogrefft is the land of the rebel Gallifreyans who refused to just stand by and observe the death of men.[citation needed]
  • Argolis is the setting of the serial The Leisure Hive. Argolis is the first of the Argolin leisure planets. Argolis became radioactive after the Argolins' 20-minute war with the Foamasi. The surviving Argolins then built a Leisure Hive, and abandoned their war-like culture to promote peace and understanding between alien races.[1][38]
  • Aridius is a planet in a binary star system that was once completely covered by oceans; its orbit around its suns was altered, causing to become a desert. The only remaining species are the amphibious Aridians and the octopus-like Mire Beasts. It is the setting for the beginning of The Chase.[39][40]
  • Arkannis Major is a planet visited by the Doctor, Rose and Jack in The Stealers of Dreams where fiction is banned. It is also known as Colony World 4378976.Delta Four, Oneiros, Journey's End and Discovery.[41]
  • Arkheon, also known as the Planet of Ghosts, is a planet located near the Crab Nebula, just past the Pleiades, left at the Blue Star Worlds. Temporal echoes resembling ghosts roamed the surface due to a temporal fissure in the planet's core. The world was virtually destroyed by the Daleks, but the remains were visited in Prisoner of the Daleks.[42]
  • Artaris is a planet visited in the Excelis Trilogy of audio plays, beginning with Excelis Dawns. Excelis was a major city-state on the planet. Bernice Summerfield and Iris Wildthyme also visited the planet.[43][44][45][46]
  • Asgard is a planet on which the Doctor and River Song went picnicking. It was mentioned in "Silence in the Library".[47]
  • Astra is a planet mentioned in The Rescue. The crew of Vicki's space ship were travelling from Earth to Astra when they crashed on Dido.[48]
  • The Asylum is the planet where the Eleventh Doctor, Amy and Rory are sent by the Daleks in the episode "Asylum of the Daleks". It was where the Daleks imprisoned insane members of their race. It was infected with nanogenes which transformed anyone, living or dead, into a zombie-like Dalek 'puppet' to serve as part of the planet's security system. It was destroyed by the Dalek Empire at the end of the episode.[49][50]
  • Atrios is a planet at war with Zeos in The Armageddon Factor.[51][52]
  • Augea is a planet mentioned in Sting of the Zygons. The planet mirrors Greek mythology and the Twelve Labours of Hercules.[53]
  • Auros is a planet colonised by humans in the Earth Empire, with a temperate climate and a single small moon. It was destroyed in the novel Prisoner of the Daleks.[42]
  • Avalon is a planet with six moons. Once home to an advanced race, it was colonised by humans, setting up a nation named Elbyon. The Doctor visited Avalon circa 3025 in the novel The Sorcerer's Apprentice.[54]
  • Axista Four is the planet on which the Independent Earth Colony was founded by Stewart Ransom in 2439. The Second Doctor, Jamie McCrimmon, and Zoe Heriot visited this colony in 2539 in the Past Doctor Adventures book, The Colony of Lies.[55]
  • Azure is a blue planet seen from the ships in the Fourth Doctor story Nightmare of Eden.[56]

B[edit]

C[edit]

  • Calliopticon is the home planet to the dwarf people race, the Meticons. It was mentioned in The Dalek Pocketbook and Space Travellers Guide.[75]
  • Calufrax is a dead, icy planet which was in actuality a disguised segment of The Key to Time in The Pirate Planet.[57]
  • Calufrax Minor is mentioned in "The Stolen Earth" as one of the 27 planets taken by Davros.[3] The comic series The Forgotten specifies that is not the same planet as Calufrax. It is home to an insect-like species of parasites.[76]
  • Carsus is a planet which the Sixth Doctor and Mel visited in the Past Doctor Adventures book, Spiral Scratch. The Library of Carsus, the largest knowledge repository in the universes, is located on this planet. It is located in the same stellar system as Lakertya.[77]
  • Cashel is a planet mentioned by the Tenth Doctor in the story "The Bog Warrior". It is a completely average planet populated by humans and consists of two kingdoms: Tollund and Lindow.[78]
  • Cassius is a planet mentioned in The Sun Makers as part of Earth's solar system.[79][80]
  • Castor 36 is a planet promised to Luke Rattigan by the Sontarans in "The Poison Sky".[81]
  • Castrovalva is the lush, green world seen in the Fifth Doctor story of that name.[82]
  • Catastrophea features in the Past Doctor Adventures novel of that name.[83]
  • Catrigan Nova is a planet the Master promises to take his wife to in "Last of the Time Lords". It has whirlpools of gold.[84]
  • Centauri Seven is a planet mentioned in Time and the Rani.[85]
  • Cep Cassalon, a group of integrated planets, are mentioned in the book Monsters and Villains, and are referenced as a place in the year five billion where the Face of Boe is known as 'the Creature that God Forgot'.[86]
  • Chavic Five is a planet mentioned in "The Long Game", the government of which has collapsed by the year 200,000, reducing the emigration of its inhabitants.[87]
  • Cheem is the home planet of the Forest of Cheem, highly evolved trees who sent delegates to witness the death of the Earth.[citation needed]
  • Cheetah Planet is the unnamed homeworld of the Cheetah People in the Seventh Doctor serial Survival. It is a beautiful world, with sand dunes and forests near a great lake. It is also a deadly world which the natives share a symbiotic relationship with.[88][89]
  • Chelonia is the home of the Chelonians, tortoise-like aliens introduced in the Virgin New Adventures novel The Highest Science.[90]
  • Chimeria is a lush, green planet mentioned in Delta and the Bannermen. It is known as "The Garden Planet".[91]
  • Chimera IV is a forest planet that holds sanctuary for the kind Chimerans, descended from the Chimeras that left ancient Greece.[citation needed]
  • Chloris is the setting of the Fourth Doctor serial The Creature from the Pit. In The Creature from the Pit, Chloris is discovered to be a lush, green jungle planet high in vegetable matter but low in minerals.[92][93] Through extensive research,[by whom?][original research?] the planet is discovered to have two suns.
  • Chronos is the setting for the webcast Real Time. The planet was conquered by the Cybermen.[94]
  • Cinethon is a planet mentioned in the Seventh Doctor story The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Clom is the home planet of the Abzorbaloff mentioned by the creature in the 2006 series episode "Love & Monsters", as being the twin planet of Raxacoricofallapatorius.[95] In "The Stolen Earth", Clom is one of the 27 planets that have been taken out of time and space by Davros and the Daleks. In hearing that the Daleks have taken Clom the Tenth Doctor remarks, "Clom's gone? Who'd want Clom?" [3] In Revenge of the Slitheen, one of the Slitheen characters is heard to say "For the love of Clom!" in frustration.[96] There is a Disneyland on Clom (mentioned in "The Girl Who Waited").[23]
  • Colano Alpha and Colano Beta are both mentioned in the story The Robots of Death. They are believed to be covered by thick sand.[97]
  • Collabria is a planet mentioned in the fifth series The Sarah Jane Adventures story Sky. The planet is red in color and features a stunning set of fiery rings.[98]
  • Collactin is a planet mentioned in The Pirate Planet. It was destroyed by the planet Zanak for its minerals.[57]
  • The Colony planet was an otherwise unnamed world that was home to a human colony, which had been infiltrated by Macra. It may lie within Galaxy M87, although this is uncertain.[original research?][citation needed]
  • Cotter Palluni's World (a.k.a. Cotta Pallunie’s World) is a planet where the skies are constantly bombarded by electricity or lightning storms, mentioned in the episode "The Sontaran Stratagem".[99]
  • Crafe Tec Heydra is a planet mentioned in the Doctor Who Annual.[vague] On the side of one of its mountains, there are carvings of the Time War with the words 'You are not alone' scratched underneath the hieroglyphs and symbols.[citation needed]
  • Crinoth is a planet visited in The Horns of Nimon.[20][100]

D[edit]

  • D5–Gamma–Z–Alpha is the Movellan name for Skaro.[101]
  • Dæmos a.k.a. Demos is the home planet of the Dæmons in the story The Dæmons.[102] It is also mentioned in "The Satan Pit" as one of many planets with legends of a horned "beast".[103] Vorg and Shirna mention visiting a planet called Demos in episode two of Carnival of Monsters,[104] but it is unclear whether this is the same planet.
  • Dakito is a planet controlled by the Shadow King.[citation needed]
  • Darbodia is a planet visited by the Doctor and his grandchildren, John and Gillian, in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "The Land of Happy Endings".[105]
  • Darkheart is a planet located in the gap between the Galaxy's spiral arms, connected to its star's mass via a dimensional bridge. It was the location of the Darkheart device, a machine that could destroy planets and alter morphic fields.[106]
  • Darp is a planet mentioned in Nightmare of Eden.[56]
  • Darillium (a.k.a. Durillium) is the location of the Singing Towers. The Doctor took Professor River Song (in his future and her past) to see these towers just before she had to go to the Library. It was mentioned in "Forest of the Dead".[107]
  • Delphon is a planet where the natives communicate with their eyebrows, first mentioned in Spearhead from Space.[108] The language is "spoken" in the Big Finish Productions audio play ...ish.[109]
  • Desperus is the penal planet of the solar system in the 41st century, seen in The Daleks' Master Plan. The native creatures of Desperus are the screamers.[110][111]
  • Deva Loka is the setting of the Fifth Doctor serial Kinda. It was once part of the Manussan Empire. The planet is very close to being a paradise, with a mild climate and warm blue seas. Much of Deva Loka is covered by sub-tropical jungles. It is also rich in exotic alien fruits and is largely unspoiled. It is the native planet of the peaceful and telepathic Kinda race.[112][113]
  • Dhakan is a planet visited in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "The Glorious Dead". Dhakan was ruled by Cardinal Morningstar, head of the Church of the Glorious Dead. It was in fact Earth, whose history had been perverted by the Master.[114]
  • Diadem is the most relaxing planet in the Galaxy. It was seen in The Crystal Bucephalus.[115]
  • Dido is the setting of The Rescue. It is a mountainous desert world home to vicious-looking but harmless sand beasts, and to a mysterious humanoid race. The Doctor describes the natives as a people to whom violence is totally alien.[48][116]
  • Dioscuros is a planet mentioned in the Seventh Doctor story The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Diplos is the home of Cessair, the Doctor's adversary in The Stones of Blood.[117]
  • Discurus is another planet that was destroyed by planet Zanak. It was mentioned in The Pirate Planet.[57]
  • Draconia is the homeworld of the Draconians and features in the serial Frontier in Space. Draconia and Earth become the dominant space-faring species at some point in the future, leading to conflict.[118][119]
  • Drahva is the home planet of the Drahvins, a female warrior race encountered by the First Doctor in Galaxy 4.[120]
  • Dravidia is a planet in the Rexel Planetary Configuration, mentioned during the sole performance of William Shakespeare's lost play Love's Labours Won in "The Shakespeare Code".[121] A Dravidian ship crash-landed on Karn in The Brain of Morbius.[122] The Dravidians are featured in the Doctor Who book The Planet of Oblivion, part of The Darksmith Legacy.[123]
  • Dronid is a planet mentioned in the unfinished serial Shada.[124]
  • Duchamp 331 is a planet used as a refuelling station for ships. It also has a gallery and a few businesses. It rains dust every day and every night there is a loud, Dalek-like scream that can be heard throughout the planet. According to legend, the origin of the screaming is that a long time ago, a Dalek saucer came down to land but the dust dragged it down and destroyed it. The Seventh Doctor and Ace visited the planet in Dust Breeding.[125]
  • Dulkis is the planet on which the Second Doctor encounters the Dominators in The Dominators.[126][127]

E[edit]

F[edit]

  • Fagiros is another planet mentioned in the Seventh Doctor story The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Felspoon is a planet mentioned by Donna in "Journey's End". The planet has mountains that sway in the breeze.[4]
  • Fifteenth Broken Moon is located in the legendary Medusa Cascade. It apparently is broken in large pieces and is mentioned by the Tenth Doctor in the episode The Sontaran Stratagem
  • The Fifth Planet in our solar system was destroyed by the Time Lords in an attempt to destroy the Fendahl, the planet's remains create the asteroid field that lays between Mars and Jupiter.[citation needed]
  • Fisar is a planet mentioned by Mavic Chen in The Daleks' Master Plan.[110]
  • Florana is one of the universe's most beautiful planets, mentioned at the end of Invasion of the Dinosaurs. It is said by the Doctor that its land is carpeted by perfumed flowers, seas of warm milk and sand as soft as swan's down.[145] It is also described as having oceans of effervescent water (where the bubbles support you) in Death to the Daleks.[140]
  • Freytus is a planet mentioned in The Ribos Operation.[146]
  • Frontios is a colony planet in the Veruna system in the serial of the same name. Frontios is a desert planet and is often bombarded by sandstorms and gale force winds.[147][148]

G[edit]

  • Galaxis Bright and Galaxis Dark are sister planets mentioned in the novella Nightdreamers. Dark was economically superior to Bright. The moon Verd orbited Bright.[149]
  • Gallifrey is the home planet of the Time Lords.[150][151] It was first seen (but not named) in The War Games[152] and first named (but not seen) in The Time Warrior.[153] It was thought to be destroyed in a Time War, wiping out nearly all of the Time Lord race.[154][155] It was in fact saved by all of thirteen incarnations of the Doctor in the fiftieth anniversary special, "The Day of the Doctor" and trapped in stasis in a pocket universe.[31][32] It has burnt-orange skies and snow-covered mountains, silver-leafed trees and red grass. Gallifrey's system has two suns.[156][157] The Time Lord council attempted to restore the planet beyond the Time War from within the time lock, using the Master and a white point star to form a physical connection beyond the time lock, but the Tenth Doctor destroyed the link.[32][158]
  • Galsec Seven is a planet mentioned in The Sontaran Experiment. It is where a human colony is located.[159]
  • Gameworld Gamma is a lush, green world owned by Mr and Mrs Pakoo, as seen in the Doctor Who Adventures.[vague] It is used to hunt humans in the year five billion.[citation needed]
  • Gauda Prime is a human colony planet in the Earth Empire and a "tough" place to live. It was mentioned in Prisoner of the Daleks.[42]
  • Gearon is a planet mentioned in "Mission to the Unknown". This is also the name of one of the delegates in the Galactic Council.[160]
  • Gidu is a stormy planet mentioned in Nightmare of Eden. Gidu has a light pinkish-yellow atmosphere and has a wide variety of vegetation. Its surface is often bombarded by gale force winds.[56]
  • Glasson Minor is a planet mentioned in The Creature from the Pit.[92]
  • Golobus is another planet mentioned in the Seventh Doctor story The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • The Gond Homeworld is the unnamed planet of the humanoid Gonds, who were in the thrall of the Krotons.[161][162]
  • Grajick Major is one of the planets Rose and the Doctor visited mentioned in Justin Richards' Ultimate Monster Guide.[163]
  • Granados is another planet that was destroyed by Zanak in The Pirate Planet.[57]
  • Grått is a world visited in the comic book "The Whispering Gallery". Emotion is outlawed amongst the humanoid inhabitants of this rainy world, described as a dwarf planet.[164]
  • Griffoth is the home planet of the Graske, and is seen in the interactive episode "Attack of the Graske".[165]
  • Griophos is a planet mentioned in Paradise Towers.[166]
  • The Grold Homeworld is a small, hot planet with a rarefied atmosphere. It is tidally locked, therefore lacking a day-night cycle. The Grold were flurosilicon-based, and appeared in The Eye of the Giant.[167]
  • Grolon is yet another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Grundle is a planet mentioned in Carnival of Monsters. A swampy satellite of this planet is home to the vicious Drashigs.[168]

H[edit]

  • Hakol (a.k.a. Harkol) is a planet mentioned in the Fifth Doctor serial The Awakening. A probe from this planet features in The Awakening. The people of Harkol can harness psychic energy, and use tinclavic metal acquired from Raaga.[169]
  • Halcya is a tranquil planet briefly visited in the comic strip "The Gift".[170]
  • Halergan Three (a.k.a. Harlequin Three) is a holiday planet mentioned in The Ribos Operation.[146]
  • Hastus Minor is a planet mentioned in The Monsters Inside. Ermenshrew Blathereen is revealed to have led a talent agency on this planet.[171]
  • Heaven is the setting of the Virgin New Adventures novel Love and War by Paul Cornell. It lies between human space and the Draconian Empire, but despite being beautiful and peaceful, has no tactical value or mineral wealth. It was a jointly administered burial ground for humans and Draconians, but became part of a plot by the Hoothi.[172]
  • Hedron is a planet where the advanced inhabitants conducted disastrous experiments with time, as seen in the Doctor Who Monthly comic strip "Time Bomb".[173]
  • Heiradi is a planet mentioned in Frontios.[147]
  • Hell is the homeworld of the Helkans, who were enslaved by the Daleks to mine pockets of the highly toxic helkogen gas beneath the planet's surface in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip story Nemesis of the Daleks.[174] It also appeared in Emperor of the Daleks! [175]
  • Hermethica is the homeworld of the Wire as mentioned in the book Creatures and Demons. The Hermethicans are not naturally formless, but the Wire's group found a way to transform themselves into plasmic energy and used their abilities to attempt takeover of the planet.[176]
  • The unnamed planet on which Hokesh was located orbited an old star near the centre of the Galaxy, suffering from temporal disturbances. Hokesh was a city, and a life form, visited in the novella Citadel of Dreams.[177]
  • House is a malevolent, sentient planetoid, located in a tiny bubble universe. House gorged itself on artron energy, and used Gallifreyan distress signals left by Time Lords that crashed on its surface to entrap other Time Lords and their TARDISes in order to feed on them. Such as a distress signal attracted the attention of the Eleventh Doctor in "The Doctor's Wife".[178][179]
  • Hurala is a planetoid that hosted a Lodestar station, a stopping off point for travellers to more distant planets. It was located in the Lasron Solar Region. It had long been abandoned by the time the Doctor arrived there in the novel Prisoner of the Daleks.[42]
  • Hyspero is a planet visited by the Eighth Doctor in the novel The Scarlet Empress. Its capital city, by the same name, has huge markets. Hyspero has a 21-hour day cycle, a mythological quality to life and its literature celebrates thieves and assassins.[180]
  • Hydropellica Hydroxi is a planet once inhabited by the sinister Gappa. The Gappa eventually consumed all lifeforms on Hydropellia Hydroxi and resorted to cannibalism. The last living Gappa was captured by a scientific expedition which crashed on Earth.[citation needed]

I[edit]

  • Indigo 3 is the location of the Blue Desert in the audio drama The Skull of Sobek. The desert is perfectly symmetrical, but in the centre is the Sanctuary of Imperfect Symmetry, a religious retreat which exists to counterbalance the desert's perfection.[181]
  • Inter Minor and Inter Major features in the Third Doctor serial Carnival of Monsters as the location of the Miniscope.[168][182]
  • Iphitus is yet another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]

J[edit]

  • Jaconda is the planet on which the Sixth Doctor serial The Twin Dilemma is set. It was once a lush, green world with lush meadows and wooded countryside. It was also once well known for its friendly natives. However, in present times, it has become an almost dead, barren and arid planet, with little vegetation. It also smells of rotting vegetables. On some parts of the planet, forests of dead trees can be seen for miles.[183][184]
  • Jahoo is one of the twenty-seven planets taken by Davros in "The Stolen Earth".[3]
  • Jalian 17 is a planet mentioned in Prisoner of the Daleks. The Doctor describes it as "all right for a party." [42]
  • Jan Francis IX is the planet visited by the Doctor, Romana, Tavius and Janet sometime in The New Adventures of Doctor Who history.[vague][citation needed]
  • Junk is one of the planets featured in the New Series Adventures novel Shining Darkness. The whole planet is a scrapyard and is located in the Andromeda Galaxy.[185]
  • Jupiter is the sixth planet from Earth's sun. The fifth planet was destroyed by the Time Lords, and its remains create the asteroid field that lies between Mars and Jupiter.[citation needed] A gas giant, Jupiter has immense gravity. An orbiting space station is the setting for the novel Fear Itself.[186] The planet has many moons including, in the future, Voga.[187]
  • Justicia is a system of prison planets featured in the New Series Adventures novel The Monsters Inside by Stephen Cole. The Justicia system has lots of planets, six of which are named after letters in the Greek alphabet: Justice Alpha, Justice Beta, Justice Gamma, Justice Delta and Justice Epsilon. There is also another planet called Justice Prime.[171] Rose Tyler mentions her visit to Justicia in the episode "Boom Town", the first explicit reference to a plot point from the novels in the television programme.[188]

K[edit]

"Kembel" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Kemble.

L[edit]

M[edit]

  • Magellan is a planet visited by the Fifth Doctor in the Doctor Who Monthly/The Official Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "The Moderator".[224]
  • Magnus or Magnus Epsilon was an Earth colony visited in the unfilmed but novelised script Mission to Magnus. Females dominate the society.[225]
  • Malcassairo is a planet featured in the Tenth Doctor episode "Utopia". It is the home of Chantho's people, the Malmooth, in their city (conglomeration). By the end of the universe it is home to a human refugee camp/space program, and the hostile Futurekind with almost all of the Malmooth wiped out.[226][227]
  • Manussa is the setting of the Fifth Doctor serial Snakedance. The planet's surface is arid and sandy and is dotted by ragged rocks.[228][229]
  • Marinus is the setting of the First Doctor serial The Keys of Marinus. It was home to a human-like race, the disembodied brains of Morpho, and the Voord.[230][231] The Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "The World Shapers" suggests that Marinus is in fact Mondas.[232]
  • Marpesia is another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Mars is the homeworld of the Ice Warriors and the Flood. The Tenth Doctor postulated that the Ice Warriors froze the Flood into a Glacier on the planet in a bitter war. Sometime in 2058, human explorers from Earth laid the foundations for their Bowie Base 1 colony upon this glacier in the hope that it would become the source of their water supplies, as seen in the 2009 episode "The Waters of Mars".[233][234] It is also the planet of origin of mysterious signals saying "Beware Sutekh" that were being beamed to Earth in Pyramids of Mars.[235] The Osirans left the GodEngine weapon there.[236] The Usurians engineered it to make it habitable by humans until the humans depleted its resources.[citation needed] In "The Long Game", a reference is also made to the University of Mars.[87] Aliens made contact with humans researching Mars in The Ambassadors of Death, but these beings were not native to the planet.[237][238]
  • Mechanus is a jungle-covered world inhabited by the Mechonoids, robots sent to prepare the planet for human colonisation. It is also the home of native fungoid life forms known as Gubbage Cones.[39][239]
  • Melagophon aka. Melogophon is another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Melissa Majoria is the homeworld of most of the Earth's bees. It was mentioned in "The Stolen Earth".[3]
  • Mer is one of the ten planets that had its entire population stolen – bar one person – in IDW's Doctor Who comic series.[vague][citation needed]
  • Mesmerus is a planet inhabited by the Hypton race. It is mentioned in The Dalek Pocketbook and Space Travellers Guide.[75]
  • Messaline is a planet visited by the Doctor in "The Doctor's Daughter". The planet is in a state of constant war. Before it was terraformed at the end of "The Doctor's Daughter", the planet's surface was cold, windy and rocky, and covered in tar pits. According to Martha Jones, the atmosphere is 80% oxygen and 20% nitrogen. The planet also has three suns. It is the homeworld of the eponymous character, Jenny.[240][241]
  • Metallurgis 5 is a planet mentioned in the novel The Resurrection Casket.[242]
  • Meta Sigmafolio (a.k.a. Meta Sigma Polia) is a planet mentioned at the end of the episode "Last of the Time Lords". It is said to have a sky that looks like oil on water. It is also said to be the place where you can see a burst of starfire.[84]
  • Meta Vorka 6 is a planet mentioned in Part One of The Sarah Jane Adventures story The Last Sontaran where the Vorkasian horde travel in spacecraft about the size of a coffee cup.[243]
  • Metazula Beta is a planet mentioned in The Maltese Penguin as the location where Dogbolter's organisation manufactures plastic chairs.[244]
  • Metebelis Three aka the Blue Planet is where the Third Doctor takes a perfect blue crystal (a Metabelis Sapphire, which contains strange powers) from in The Green Death,[245][246] and where he returns to in the serial Planet of the Spiders.[246][247] It is also mentioned in Carnival of Monsters.[168] It is again mentioned in the 2013 episode "Hide", in which the Eleventh Doctor uses a blue crystal to amplify the natural clairvoyant abilities of a psychic in a device called a psychochronograph.[248] The planet has a blue sun,[246] has more than one moon, blue mountains,[additional citation needed] the night-time sky is blue (and is light blue during the day)[246] and often snows at night.[additional citation needed] Mist sometimes rolls over its surface.[citation needed] Native creatures include Metabelian Snakes (giant snakes), meat-eating tentacles and giant flying predators, which are seen briefly in The Green Death when the Doctor visits the planet.[245][246] It is called the Blue Planet because the moonlight is blue.[246] In his impersonation of Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor in Dead Ringers, Jon Culshaw makes frequent reference to this planet.[citation needed] According to Part Two of The Sarah Jane Adventures story The Lost Boy, the Metebelan Cosmic Cluster is home to 68,000 lifeforms.[249]
  • Metralubit is a remote human colony in the Fostrix galaxy in the 58th Segment of Time. The capital city is Metron. An intelligent gestalt of flies named Hive existed here, and could possess and animate dead bodies.[250]
  • Miasimia Goria is a planet ruled by the Rani.[citation needed]
  • Midnight is a leisure planet visited by the Tenth Doctor and Donna in the episode of the same name. It has golden spas, anti-gravity restaurants, sapphire waterfalls, and a landscape of diamonds. The planet's sun emits x-tonic radiation, which vaporises organic matter and can only be viewed safely through sufficiently thick finito glass. The radiation poisons the diamonds, so the planet's surface can never be touched. However, there is some form of native life, which possesses a tourist named Sky Silvestry.[251][252]
  • Minyos is the original homeworld of the Minyans, and Minyos II is where they settle at the end of the serial Underworld.[253]
  • Mira is the planet of the invisible predatory Visians, visited in The Daleks' Master Plan. It is described as 'a strange planet in a strange galaxy.' What we see of the planet is mostly swamp-like.[110][254]
  • Mirabilis Major and Mirabilis Minor are both mentioned in The Ribos Operation.[146]
  • The Mobox homeworld was visited in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "Uroboros". The Mobox were intelligent, bulky creatures that could breathe fire.[255]
  • Mogar is a planet stripped bare of all its natural resources by humans. In Terror of the Vervoids, the Hyperion III spaceship sets off from Mogar with a cargo of deadly Vervoids created on the planet. Mogar is (or was) the source of many valuable and rare metals, including the mineral vionesium (a mineral similar to magnesium) that emits an intense light when exposed to oxygen. Mogar is an oxygen-free planet with a reddish surface.[256]
  • Mondaran is a planet now in ruins by the Cybermen. The Cybermen hold curfews with nightly patrols everyday on the planet making sure no one is on the streets.[citation needed]
  • Mondas is the home planet of the Cybermen, first seen in The Tenth Planet. An exact physical duplicate of the Earth, it drifted away to the 'edge of space' before returning to its destruction.[clarification needed][257] The Fifth Doctor visited it earlier in its history in the audio drama Spare Parts.[258]
  • Morestra is a planet mentioned in Planet of Evil. It is located in the Artoro Galaxy.[259]
  • Morok is the home of the Moroks, the rulers of Xeros in The Space Museum. At one point, Morok was the centre of a large interstellar empire.[205][260]
  • The Museum of the Last Ones is the setting of the Tenth Doctor New Series Adventures novel The Last Dodo. It is an entire planet dedicated to a museum displaying the last of every species from every planet in the universe.[64]
  • Muscolane is another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Myarr is a planet first visited in the fifth episode of The Infinite Quest and the prime setting of the sixth and seventh. It is the location of the third data chip that will lead to the Infinite. The planet was claimed by both the Human Empire and the Mantasphid Hive.[21]

N[edit]

  • Navaros (or Navarro) is the planet of the Navarinos, tour-loving aliens from the Seventh Doctor serial Delta and the Bannermen.[91]
  • Necros[261] is a frozen planet used as a final resting place for the galaxy's dead. It features in the serial Revelation of the Daleks. It also has dark land masses and is almost constantly bombarded by turbulent weather.[261][262]
  • Nefrin is a planet in a distant galaxy. It is the home of Brimo, an immortal, from the Doctor Who Weekly comic strip "The Time Witch".[263]
  • Neogorgon is another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • New Alexandria is the planet that hosted the restaurant The Crystal Bucephalus in the novel of the same name. It is heavily implied to be the ruins of Gallifrey.[115]
  • New Earth is a planet in the galaxy M87, first seen in the episode of the same name.[264][265] By all accounts noted through images of New Earth, it looks like the planet exists as an Earth-sized moon of a bigger, pinkish coloured planet existing along with another moon of the bigger, pinkish coloured planet. Though it is possible that this larger, pinkish coloured planet sits very close to New Earth in another orbit, though unlikely as the planet seems far too close to not have New Earth as one of its moons.[original research?] It is the new home of humanity five billion years in the future. New Earth is the same size as Earth and has the same atmosphere and orbit, though the continents and ecology are different. The city of New New York (the 15th New York after the original) is located here.[264][265] In "Gridlock", much of the population has died from a virus save for those isolated in the underground motorway, which is also home to numerous devolved Macra.[156][265]
  • Another planet named New Earth, unrelated to the above, was visited in the Doctor Who Weekly comic strip "The Dogs of Doom". The inhabitants were being transformed into Wereloks, in a scheme revealed to be masterminded by the Daleks.[266]
  • New Savannah is a planet in the Felinus system, in the Galaxy M57. It was the home planet of the Catkind. On the eve of the year 5 billion, it became part of the New Human Empire. Visited in IDW's Doctor Who comic series.[vague][citation needed]
  • New Venus is a planet mentioned in "The Long Game". In the year 200,000, sandstorms on this planet kill 200 sentients in the Archipelago.[87]
  • Nooma is a planet visited in the novel Speed of Flight. For 4000 years, a genetic experiment was conducted on the natives.[267]
  • Nyrruh 4 is one of the ten planets that had its entire population stolen – bar one person – in IDW's Doctor Who comic series.[vague][citation needed]

O[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

  • Qualactin is the only planet, apart from Bandraginus V, on which the mineral Oolion occurs naturally. Mentioned in the Fourth Doctor story The Pirate Planet.[57]
  • Quinnis is a planet in the 'Fourth Universe' visited by the First Doctor and Susan as referenced in the serial The Edge of Destruction.[302]

R[edit]

S[edit]

  • S14 is an alternative name for Deva Loka.[112][113]
  • Salarius is a planet mentioned in The Resurrection Casket.[242]
  • Salostophus is a planet in the constellation of Andromeda. Sabalom Glitz revealed in The Mysterious Planet that this was his home planet.[304]
  • Salvak is a neighbouring planet to Magnus in Mission to Magnus.[225]
  • San Helios is the desert world visited by the Tenth Doctor and Lady Christina de Souza in "Planet of the Dead". San Helios had a population of 100 billion, prior to an attack by an alien swarm. It is located in the Scorpion Nebula, which is on the other side of the universe to Earth, and has three suns – 1 blue, 1 white and 1 orange. The planet had mountains, oceans, wildlife and vegetation, some of which could be found around San Helios City, the planet's capital, until it was all destroyed, turned into sand.[312][313]
  • San Kaloon (a.k.a. Sanclune) is a planet visited by the Ninth Doctor and Rose. It has a glass pyramid. It was mentioned in "Boom Town".[188] It is also mentioned somewhere in the original series, though under a different spelling[citation needed].
  • Santiny is a planet inhabited by a human-like people. It's rich in resources and has huge forests. It was a major setting of Death Comes to Time, and was invaded by the Canisians.[9]
  • Sant's World is a planet mentioned in the book Monsters and Villains in the year five billion.[vague][86]
  • Sarn is the Planet of Fire in the Fifth Doctor serial of the same name. It is a rocky and barren planet with a high amount of volcanic activity.[314][315] The Spanish island of Lanzarote, with its unique volcanic features, was the filming location for Sarn.[citation needed]
  • Saturnyne was the homeworld of the Saturnynians, a race of exo-skeletal fish creatures who thrived in the planet's seas, besieged by cracks in the universe. At first the cracks appeared to pose no real danger and the aliens were able to observe other worlds through them. Eventually however, the true nature of the cracks became apparent and Saturnyne was consumed, forcing the Saturnynians to flee through the smaller cracks to other worlds. It was mentioned in "The Vampires of Venice".[316]
  • Sava is a planet mentioned in The Ark.[307]
  • Scalpor is a planet mentioned in Vengeance on Varos.[317]
  • Scrantek is the home planet of the horrific Fleshsmiths, in the novel Prime Time. It is located in the Brago Nebula, and plagued by ionising radiation and lightning storms that have detroyed the natives' bodies.[70]
  • Scotia is a planet mentioned in The Resurrection Casket.[242]
  • Segonax is a dusty, arid, desert planet with a blue atmosphere. A large, magenta-pink ringed planet is seen in Segonax's skyline. There is little plant life, animal life and water on the planet, but is not without a stable ecosystem or life, including the native Segonaxians. It is also where the Psychic Circus is performing in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy. This is one of many planets that were visited by the Psychic Circus.[15][318]
  • The Sense-Sphere is the home planet of the Sensorites, a telepathic but xenophobic species. It has a high concentration of the valuable element molybdenum. It is located near to the planet Ood-Sphere. It is first seen in The Sensorites.[136][319]
  • Shada is the prison planet of the Time Lords in the serial of the same name.[124]
  • Shadmoch is a planet in the Rexel planetary configuration with a hollow moon.[citation needed]
  • Shallacatop (a.k.a. Challakatop) One of the 27 planets taken by Davros in "The Stolen Earth".[3]
  • Shan Shen is a planet visited in "Turn Left". The planet was inhabited by humanoid species with a somewhat Chinese influenced culture (described[by whom?][citation needed] as a 'Chino' planet), a mixture of flags, pagodas and futuristic skyscrapers influenced by ancient Chinese architecture.[320][321] It has two moons, and lies millions of light years from Earth.[additional citation needed]
  • Shantella Prime is a planet mentioned in the Tenth Doctor comic strip "Which Switch?" in Doctor Who Magazine.[citation needed]
  • Shallanna (a.k.a. Shrillanna) is a planet mentioned in the Eleventh Doctor episode "The Girl Who Waited". Amy Pond walks through an Apalapucian garden, the topiary of which is said according to the interface to be perfect replicas of those found on a Shill governor's mansion garden on Shallanna.[23]
  • A shrub planet, an unnamed planet made entirely of shrubs, was mentioned in the series 8 episode "Mummy on the Orient Express".[269]
  • Sigma home planet of the Doctor Who Monthly character Doctor Asimoff.[citation needed]
  • Sinda Callesta is a planet mentioned in the Eleventh Doctor episode "The Lodger". The Doctor was planning on taking Amy to its fifth moon, but ended up landing on Earth.[322]
  • Siralos is one of the 700 Wonders of the Universe, and it is the planet made of pure psychic energy that the Master takes over in the computer game Doctor Who: Destiny of the Doctors.[323]
  • Sireen is the home planet of one the prisoners in Destiny of the Daleks.[8]
  • Sirius IV is an Earth colony planet referenced in Frontier in Space.[118] This planet, as well as Sirius V, Androzani Major, Androzani Minor and Alpha Canis One make up the system of 5 planets known as the Sirius System, which orbits around the star Sirius, which is in fact a binary star, with one white star (Sirius A) and one white dwarf (Sirius B).[additional citation needed]
  • Sirius V is a planet mentioned in City of Death.[324] It is one of the planets in the Sirius System.[additional citation needed]
  • Skaar was where the Graff Vynda-K's men fought in the Alliance Wars mentioned in The Ribos Operation.[146]
  • Skaro is the home planet of the Daleks, the Thals and the Kaleds.[101][325][326] First seen on screen in a cliffhanger at the end of An Unearthly Child,[327] which led into The Daleks, where it was shown more substantially,[325] Skaro was the first planet other than Earth to appear in Doctor Who. It is a rocky, barren planet with little vegetation. A thick fog sometimes rolls over its surface and its upper atmosphere is coloured red.[citation needed] Landmarks include the Lake of Mutations and the Petrified Forest.[101][325] Davros accidentally destroyed the planet using the Hand of Omega in Remembrance of the Daleks, having been tricked by the Seventh Doctor.[101][328] In the 1996 film Doctor Who, Skaro is shown to have two moons.[329] Skaro was seen again in the episode "Asylum of the Daleks".[49] It is referred to by the Movellans in Destiny of the Daleks as D5–Gamma–Z–Alpha.[8][101]
  • Skonnos is the setting for much of The Horns of Nimon.[20][330]
  • Skythros is mentioned in The Ribos Operation.[146]
  • The Slough of The Disunited Planets is the setting of the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip story The Warkeeper's Crown. The Disunited Planets form a galaxy where the inhabitants have waged war since the near the beginning of time and is a place where space travellers avoid at all costs.[331]
  • Sol 3 is another name for Earth.[citation needed]
  • Solos is the setting of the Third Doctor serial The Mutants. During the day, the ultraviolet rays from its sun makes its atmosphere poisonous to humans. It has four seasons, each lasting five hundred years.[332][333]
  • Sontar (or Sontara) is the homeworld of the Sontarans. The Virgin Missing Adventures novel The Crystal Bucephalus by Craig Hinton names the planet as "Sontara".[115] Yet in "The Sontaran Stratagem" and "The Poison Sky", the Sontarans referred to their home planet as Sontar.[81][99] The official website explicitly states their home planet as Sontar.[334]
  • Spiridon is an inhospitable[to whom?] planet, home to the Spiridons, a race of beings with the natural ability to become invisible. The Daleks kept a secret army there in Planet of the Daleks. In this story, Spiridon is discovered to be a lush, green jungle planet where the plant life is more animal than plant. Temperatures range from tropical in the day to below freezing at night. Its landmarks include the Plain of Stones, molten ice pools (molten ice being ice that never freezes but is extremely cold) and molten ice volcanoes.[335][336] Spiridon is also featured in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip story Emperor of the Daleks![175] and the audio drama Return of the Daleks.[337]
  • Splendurosa is home to a floating coral city, visited in the short story "Grand Theft Planet".[338]
  • Starfall is the setting of the Tenth Doctor New Series Adventures novel The Resurrection Casket, a planet where no technology works except steam power due to the EMP which covers the entire world of Starfall except for the outskirts.[242]
  • Stella Stora is a planet mentioned in Terror of the Vervoids.[256]
  • Sto is a planet located in the Cassavalian Belt. It is the home planet of those, including Astrid Peth and Max Capricorn, aboard the Titanic in "Voyage of the Damned". Although the dominant species is humanlike, Sto is also home to the red, spiny-skinned Zocci,[note 1] and to cyborgs who are treated as an underclass.[289]
  • Stormcage is a prison planet for the worst criminals in the galaxies.[additional citation needed] Dr River Song, or Melody Pond, is put in there for murdering "A good, good man." She continually breaks out throughout the series.[citation needed]
  • Strepto is the home planet of the water hags featured in the Torchwood novel, Something in the Water.[340] The Time Traveller's Almanac confirms that it was one of the 27 planets stolen by the Daleks in "The Stolen Earth".[3][341]
  • Stricium is a planet mentioned in City of Death as the location of the Solarium Panatica gallery.[324]
  • Sunday is the setting of the Tenth Doctor New Series Adventures novel Wetworld. It is inhabited by intelligent creatures resembling terrestrial otters.[342]
  • Svartos is the location of Iceworld in the serial Dragonfire. The planet is locked in its orbit, causing one side of the planet to be in permanent sunshine, while the other side is permanently cold and icy.[299][300]
  • Sycorax is the homeworld of the Sycorax race. Located in the JX82 system, is was broken up into asteroid-starships, including the flagship Fire Trap.[citation needed] It should not be confused with Uranus's moon of the same name.
  • Sylvaniar is a planet visited by the Sixth Doctor in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "Revelation!" It had been infiltrated by Cybermen.[343]
  • Szabo is a planet mentioned in The Creature from the Pit.[92]

T[edit]

  • Ta is the headquarters of the Issigri Mining Corporation and features in the Second Doctor serial The Space Pirates. Its parent star is called Pliny.[217][218]
  • Tara is the setting of the Fourth Doctor serial The Androids of Tara.[344][345] It is a planet resembling 19th century Earth,[where?][clarification needed] with lush green fields, attractive landscapes and medieval type forests.[clarification needed]
  • Tarsius is a planet Captain Jack Harkness recalls encountering a 'proto-humanoid Gloobi hybrid' in the 39th century wastes of in the novel Only Human.[62]
  • Taurean Nomeworld is one of the ten planets that had its entire population stolen – bar one person – in IDW's Doctor Who comic series.[vague][citation needed]
  • Telos is a colony world of the Cybermen, first seen in The Tomb of the Cybermen.[346][347] It is an arid, mountainous planet that was once an ice planet until the temperatures on the planet rose.[citation needed] The native inhabitants were the Cryons.[309][348]
  • Tenten 10, also known as the Decimal Planet, is mentioned in passing in the novel Prisoner of the Daleks.[42]
  • Terileptus is the homeworld of the Terileptils, a race seen in the episode The Visitation.[303] The name of their home planet is mentioned in the Virgin Missing Adventures novel The Dark Path.[106]
  • Terra Alpha is the location of Helen A's misery-free colony (or so some[who?] believe) in The Happiness Patrol. It is a gloomy planet with a yellow-purplish atmosphere. The conditions[vague][clarification needed] on the planet are terrible and demonstrations are frequent.[349][350]
  • Terra Beta and Terra Omega are both mentioned in The Happiness Patrol.[349]
  • Terradon was the origin of the starliner on Alzarius in the Fourth Doctor serial Full Circle.[13][14]
  • Tersurus is the planet on which Chancellor Goth met the dying Master prior to The Deadly Assassin.[351] It was also the setting of the Comic Relief spoof episode The Curse of Fatal Death. The spoof described the Tersurons as the most gentle, yet most shunned race in the universe, because they communicated through carefully controlled "gastric emissions". They became extinct when they discovered fire.[352]
  • Tetrapyriarbus is the home planet of the Tetraps.[citation needed]
  • Thegeros is another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Therka is a planet mentioned in the original series.[vague][citation needed]
  • Therra is another planet mentioned in The Greatest Show in the Galaxy.[15]
  • Thordon is a planet mentioned in Mindwarp.[190]
  • Thoros-Alpha and Thoros-Beta[353] are planets featured in Mindwarp.[190][353] Thoros-Beta is home to the Mentors, an amphibious race. The Doctor first encounters a Mentor – Sil – in Vengeance on Varos and mention of Thoros-Beta is made in that serial.[317] Thoros-Alpha is a ringed planet seen in Thoros-Beta's skyline and looks green through Thoros-Beta's bright neon green atmosphere. Thoros-Beta has bright neon pink oceans.[190]
  • Thrace is a planet mentioned in "New Earth".[264][353]
  • Thuron is the home planet of the cyclopean Castelathurons, in the short story "Island of the Sirens".[338]
  • Thideon 4 is another planet mentioned in the Doctor Who series 8 episode "Mummy on the Orient Express". The Twelfth Doctor mentioned how it rains acid rain there and that he had once had a picnic there while wearing a gas mask. There is also a passing reference mentioning that it was destroyed by some undisclosed event.[269]
  • Tiermann's World is the setting of the Tenth Doctor New Series Adventures novel Sick Building. A planet named after the professor that lives there, it is covered by wintry woods.[354]
  • Tigella is a tropical planet that is the neighbouring planet to Zolfa Thura in Meglos.[355][356]
  • Tigus is a planet visited in The Daleks' Master Plan. It is a young planet and still highly volcanic.[110][357]
  • Tisar is a planet mentioned in The Daleks' Master Plan.[110]
  • Titan III is a desolate planetoid with a hostile climate on which the Sixth Doctor planned to become a hermit in The Twin Dilemma.[183][358]
  • Titania is a hot gaseous planet, in a system between the secondary and tertiary arms of the Galaxy. Its moon, Dramos, is visited in the novel Burning Heart.[359]
  • Tivoli is mentioned in "The God Complex" as the most invaded planet in the galaxy. The anthem of Tivoli is "Glory To Insert Name Here" and the town planning committee is planning to plant trees along all highways so that invading forces can march in the shade.[360]
  • Tokl is a planet mentioned in Mindwarp.[190]
  • Toop was the home planet of the Quevvils and Mantodeans in the New Series Adventures novel Winner Takes All.[361]
  • Torajii Alpha is a planet mentioned in the Tenth Doctor short story "42: Prologue". The sun of this planet is actually a living organism. In the episode "42", it is said to be located in the Torajii System.[202]
  • Traken in the Metulla Orionsis system was the densely forested homeworld to a race of pacifists and the centre of the Traken Union. It was first seen in The Keeper of Traken[362][363] and destroyed by a wave of entropy in the following story Logopolis.[219][363] The Doctor's companion, Nyssa, was a native of Traken.[362]
  • Trieste is another planet from The Creature from the Pit.[92] It is also mentioned in novel.[clarification needed][vague][citation needed]
  • Tranquela is the setting of part of The Ultimate Evil, one of the Missing Episodes that never reached production during Doctor Who‍ '​s 1985 hiatus.[364]
  • Trenzalore is a planet mentioned in the episode "The Wedding of River Song"[365] and seen in "The Name of the Doctor".[366] Dorium Maldovar said in "The Wedding of River Song" that on its war-torn fields silence will fall when the oldest question in the universe, "Doctor who?" is asked.[365][367] In "The Name of the Doctor", Trenzalore is revealed to be the final resting place of the Doctor, entombed in his TARDIS.[366][368] In the Eleventh Doctor's swan song, "The Time of the Doctor", the question is revealed to have been asked across all of time by the Time Lords to verify the Doctor's presence, that they might return to the universe through a crack in the space-time fabric. This attracts the attention of both the Doctor's various enemies, who intend to resume the Time War, and the Church of the Papal Mainframe, who resolve to destroy the planet and avoid this possibility. As a result, bent on protecting the citizens of the town of Christmas on Trenzalore, the Doctor spends centuries fighting off the invading forces until only the Daleks remain. He is ultimately given a new set of regenerations by the Time Lords through the crack, which closes, allowing the Doctor to escape the planet in a new body after hundreds of years of servitude to it.[369][370]
  • Trion is the home planet of the Doctor's companion Turlough, featured in Planet of Fire.[314]
  • Triton is the homeworld of Balthazar, who was the planet's corsair king.[citation needed] Also the homeworld of the alien Waro in The Devil Goblins from Neptune.[371]
  • Tythonus (a.k.a. Tithonus) is the home planet of Erato, the globulous green entity in the Fourth Doctor serial The Creature from the Pit.[92]

U[edit]

  • Umbeka is a planet mentioned in the Tenth Doctor novel The Resurrection Casket. It is the planet from which ever-lasting matches originate. Its winters last for centuries, while its summers only last a few weeks.[242]
  • Unicepter IV Planet where the natives developed telepathic dreaming technology, visited in the Doctor Who Monthly comic strip "Dreamers of Death".[372]
  • Uranus is the seventh planet in the solar system. It is mentioned in The Daleks' Master Plan as the Galaxy's only source of the element taranium.[110]
  • Urbanka in the Inokshi System, in the Galaxy 1489 is the planet of the frog-like Urbankans, the technologically gifted aliens in the Fifth Doctor serial Four to Doomsday. Once a lush, tropical planet, its habitat was destroyed by radiation.[373]
  • Usurius is the planet of the Usurians, coincidentally a race of usurers who feature in the Fourth Doctor serial The Sun Makers.[79]
  • Utopia is the fictional place the last humans are attempting to reach in the Tenth Doctor episode "Utopia".[226][227] At its co-ordinates, the last humans found darkness, and eventually cannibalised themselves into the 'Toclafane'. The Master unleashes them on present day Earth through a rift opened by a paradox generator installed in the TARDIS.[84]
  • UX-4732 is a planet with a unique insectoid ecosystem, visited by the fourth Doctor in the Doctor Who Monthly comic strip "Spider-God".[374]
  • Uxarieus[139] is the location of the Doomsday Weapon in the Third Doctor serial Colony in Space.[137][139] In the novelisation, Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon, it was spelt Exarius.[138]

V[edit]

W[edit]

  • Wilson 1 is a planet mentioned in Mindwarp.[190]
  • Woldyhool is a planet visited by the Doctor and Rose in the Doctor Who Adventures.[vague][citation needed] It is a planet dedicated to hyperfilm production, and is used by the great director Zemm Foolini in the year five billion.
  • Woman Wept is a planet visited by Rose Tyler and the Ninth Doctor where the continental land mass is shaped like a lamenting woman; and the entire ocean, including waves hundreds of feet high, froze in an instant by means of some undisclosed natural disaster. Rose mentioned her visit in "Boom Town".[188] It is one of the planets revealed to have been taken by Davros in "The Stolen Earth".[3]

X[edit]

  • Xenon is the home planet of the shapeshifting Whifferdills, of whom Frobisher, the Sixth Doctor's comic strip companion, is an example.[citation needed]
  • Xeros is the location of the Space Museum in the First Doctor serial of that name. The native Xerons are humanoids. Xeros was part of the Morok Empire, located only three light years from Morok itself.[205]
  • Xeriphas is the home planet of the Xeraphin, referred to in the Fifth Doctor serial Time-Flight.[203] It is also Kamelion's planet of origin.[citation needed]

Y[edit]

Z[edit]

Others[edit]

Stars and star related objects[edit]

Galaxies[edit]

Systems[edit]

  • 4-X-Alpha-4 is the extragalactic star system that is home to the Movellans, as identified by Romana in Destiny of the Daleks.[8]
  • Alpha Centauri is the star system from which the delegate Alpha Centauri, seen in The Curse of Peladon[283] and The Monster of Peladon,[284] originates. The name of Alpha Centauri's planet is not given.
  • The Carra System (a.k.a. Carris System) is said to be the location of the Infinite in the animated story The Infinite Quest. It contains several planets, at least five of which have rings.[21]
  • The Garazone System is the location of the Garazone Bazaar, visited in the audio Sword of Orion.[401]
  • The Inokshi System (a.k.a. Inoksha System) is the system of planets that the planet Urbanka is located in. It was mentioned in the serial Four to Doomsday.[373]
  • The Prion System is said to be the system that the planets Tigella and Zolfa-Thura from Meglos are located.[355][356][391]
  • The Rexel Planetary Configuration is a stellar system that included fourteen worlds (sometimes said to be fourteen stars), including Rexel 4, Shadmoch and Dravidia.[citation needed]
  • The Rifta System is the solar system of the planets Riften 5 and Rifter. The planet Harkol is located in a system near this one.[citation needed]
  • The Scarlet System is a system of planets and suns that was home to the billion-year-old Polushi civilisation. It is pulled into the black hole that Krop Tor orbits and destroyed in "The Impossible Planet".[206]
  • The Scrampus System is the solar system that the planet Manussa (Planet G 139901 KB) belongs to.[citation needed]
  • The Torajii System, mentioned in the episode "42", has least one ringed planet and several other smaller planets.[202]

Nebulae and other stellar regions[edit]

  • The Caldian Cluster is a cluster mentioned in part two of The Sarah Jane Adventures story Enemy of the Bane. It is said to be the location of a part of a tyrannical and immortal being known as Horath of the Dark Empire which was found by the Bane to be brought back to Earth, where the other part of his body was located.[402]
  • The Celestial Belt of the Winter Queen is a region of space mentioned in "The Waters of Mars".[233]
  • The Dagmar Cluster is a stellar region that was the location of the SS Madame de Pompadour. It was located two-and-a-half galaxies from Earth.[403]
  • E-Space, or Exo-Space, is another universe connected to our own by Charged Vacuum Emboitments, through which entropy is vented from N-Space or Normal-Space to stave off the heat death of the universe. It contains its own planets, including Adric's home world, Alzarius.[citation needed]
  • The Horsehead Nebula is a real nebula that Russell T Davies said was the general area of the home planet of the Ood, Oodsphere[citation needed]. In the story "Planet of the Ood" it is mentioned that Sense-Sphere (from The Sensorites) is a near neighbour and therefore presumably also part of the nebula.[original research?] In The Sarah Jane Adventures story Warriors of Kudlak, this was said to be the location of the Ghost Wars, which had lasted for hundreds of years between an alien race known as the Uvodni and another alien race known as the Malakh until 10 years ago, when a peace treaty was finally established between the two races.[404]
  • The Hercules Cluster is a group of stars observed in The Wheel in Space.[405]
  • Kasterborous is the constellation in which Gallifrey is located.[31][157][289]
  • The Lotus Nebula is mentioned by John Hart as being where he could be experiencing 17 simultaneous pleasures in the episode Exit Wounds.[406]
  • The Madillon Cluster is a star cluster mentioned in The Two Doctors.[65]
  • The Map of the Water Snake Wormholes is another region of space mentioned in the Doctor Who special "The Waters of Mars".[233]
  • The Medusa Cascade is an Interuniversal Rift, and also a space-time rift.[3] The Master mentions that the Doctor sealed the rift here in "Last of the Time Lords".[84] It is mentioned to have a "15th broken moon" in "The Sontaran Stratagem".[99] In "The Stolen Earth", it is where Davros and his Daleks have assembled their 27 stolen planets around Davros' Crucible.[3] It was also referenced by Evelina in "The Fires of Pompeii" in reference to the Doctor himself: "Your real name is hidden. It burns in the stars, in the Cascade of Medusa herself".[301]
  • Messier 13 is a grouping of stars mentioned in The Wheel in Space.[405]
  • Metulla Orionsis[363] is a region of space said to be the location of Traken in Logopolis.[219][363]
  • Miros is a constellation mentioned in "Mission to the Unknown".[160]
  • N-Space, or Normal-space, is our universe, where heat death should have already occurred, but for the Logopolitans' creation of the CVEs to shunt the excess entropy into other universes, including E-space.[219] Unless otherwise noted, all planets listed are in N-Space.
  • The Obverse, a parallel continuum visited in the novel The Blue Angel[407] possibly[original research?] the original home of Iris Wildthyme. The Enclave is a pocket universe within the Obverse, inhabited by races such as the Gillighast and the Glass Men of Valcea.[citation needed]
  • The Panjassic Asteroid Field is mentioned in the Doctor Who book Monsters and Villains as the isolated asteroid field bought by the Brothers of Hame in the year Five Billion as a base for the evolution acceleration experiments run on trees, resulting in the Forest of Cheem.[86]
  • The Scorpion Nebula is a molecular cloud described as being on the "other side of the universe" to Earth. Within it lies the planet San Helios. The Tritovores originate either within the nebula or nearby.[313]
  • The Perseus Cluster is a group of stars mentioned in The Wheel in Space.[405]
  • The Silver Devastation is a place mentioned to be the origin of the Face of Boe in "The End of the World".[154] It is also where Professor Yana (the Master in human disguise) claims to have been found as an orphan in "Utopia".[226] It is a vast stellar region full of dead stars surrounded by degenerate and dark matter, created during a collision between two galaxies.[citation needed]
  • The Phylox Series are a gathering of stars said to be part of the Andromeda constellation. It is the location of the eponymous planet in Castrovalva.[82]
  • The Time Vortex is the continuum that time machines travel through on the way from one destination to another.[citation needed]
  • Skythra is the constellation which is said to be the location of the planet Ribos. It was mentioned in The Ribos Operation.[146]
  • The Vahiden Horizon is a stellar region mentioned in the fifth series Sarah Jane Adventures story Sky. It is a vast area of space that features stunning interstellar lightning storms.[98]
  • The Void is the name given by the Time Lords to the infinite nothingness between dimensions, where even time does not exist. According to the Doctor, in "Army of Ghosts", Eternals call it the Howling, and some others call it Hell. It is only traversable using a void ship,[408] and prior to the Time War, by a TARDIS.[409] Various inhabitants of a parallel version of Earth-most notably the Cybermen-were also able to travel across the void to the Earth of the main universe due to the damage caused by the Cult of Skaro's Void ship.[29][408] The Tenth Doctor later sealed the Void by reversing a process previously used to open it, drawing millions of Cybermen and Daleks into the Void in the process.[29] If successfully detonated, the Reality Bomb created by Davros and the Daleks, seen in "Journey's End", would also have destroyed the void. The breaking down of barriers caused by this event allowed Rose Tyler and others who had relocated to the parallel Earth to return to the main universe, and the Tenth Doctor was able to travel there to return Rose, her mother Jackie Tyler and the Meta-Crisis Tenth Doctor.[4]

Moons[edit]

  • Delta Magna's third moon (known as Delta 3) is the setting of The Key to Time serial The Power of Kroll. It is mostly covered by wet and boggy swamps, with reeds as tall as the TARDIS.[72][410]
  • Dramos is the moon of Titania. It was visited in Burning Heart. A third of its surface is covered by an artificial habitat.[359]
  • The third moon of Grundle was home to the voracious Drashigs.[citation needed]
  • The Lost Moon of Poosh is a moon of the planet Poosh, first mentioned in "Midnight".[251] In "The Stolen Earth", it is revealed as one of the 27 planets stolen by the Daleks.[3]
  • The Moon is the single, natural satellite of Earth. In "Smith and Jones", a hospital was temporarily transported there.[281][411] From the 21st century onwards it is the location of a number of scientific outposts, such as a weather control centre[412][413] and a "T-Mat" hub.[413][414] In the 26th century, it had a prison for political prisoners.[118][413] The Moon was destroyed in the far future in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip "Wormwood".[415] In "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship", set in the 24th century, the Eleventh Doctor says, "Try not to bump into the Moon. Otherwise, the races who live there will be livid."[413][416] In "Kill the Moon", set in 2049, the Moon is shown to be a 100-million-year-old egg containing a gigantic, winged creature. At the end of the episode, the Moon is destroyed by the creature's hatching, but is replaced by another egg which it lays.[417][418]
  • Omega Mysterium, Falkus and Flidor are the three moons of Skaro. They were mentioned in both The Daleks comic strip[vague] and the Time War audiobook. [clarification needed][citation needed] First appearing in The Dalek Book, Flidor is a dead world rich in blue-veined gold.[419] Two of the three moons were also seen very briefly at the beginning of the Doctor Who TV movie.[329]
  • Phobos is a moon of Mars created by the Ice Warriors. By the year 2589 it served as a popular destination for extreme sports.[420]
  • Pictos is one of Vortis' moons from The Web Planet.[383][384]
  • Titan is a moon of Saturn visited in The Invisible Enemy.[421][422]
  • There is an unnamed moon or planetoid of Vertigan Majoris that was visited in the First Doctor novel Ten Little Aliens.[380]
  • Voga is also known as the Planet of Gold. A wandering asteroid captured by Jupiter's orbit, it is homeworld to the Vogans and contains more gold than in the rest of the known galaxy. The Cybermen try to destroy it in Revenge of the Cybermen.[187][423]

Asteroids[edit]

  • Demons Run[424] is an asteroid on which a military base was built on. It is the birthplace of Melody Pond; its infirmary served as a prison for Amy Pond from shortly after Melody's conception until weeks after the latter's birth. The name of the asteroid, on which the majority of "A Good Man Goes to War" takes place, is derived from an old saying: "Demons run when a good man goes to war," the first line of an eight-line poem.[424][425]

Miscellaneous[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bannakaffalatta is identified as coming from Sto in "Voyage of the Damned", although it is not until The End of Time that his species name is identified as Zocci.[339]

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External links[edit]