List of Donald Trump 2020 presidential campaign endorsements

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This is a list of notable individuals and organizations who voiced their endorsement for the office of the president of Donald Trump as the Republican Party's presidential candidate for the 2020 United States presidential election.

Endorsements[edit]

The Republican Party[edit]

Starting in 1932, when President Hoover was able to unanimously secure that year's nomination despite losing most primaries, the Republican party has always unofficially supported the incumbent despite remaining officially aloof.[original research?][1] This strategy has not always proven successful, as President Gerald Ford nearly lost the nomination[2] in the 1976 primaries and President George H.W. Bush was badly damaged there in 1992.[citation needed]

In December of 2018, the Trump campaign announced that it was merging its field operations with that of the Republican National Committee's.[3] The following month at the RNC's winter meeting in New Mexico, while acknowledging that declaring the President the party's provisional nominee would break FEC rules, the RNC voted to endorse him informally by voting to give him its "full support."[4]

U.S. Executive Branch officials[edit]

Current

Vice President Mike Pence in 2017
Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions in 2017
HUD Secretary Ben Carson in 2017

Former

U.S. Senators[edit]

Current

U.S. Senator Rick Scott in 2019
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in 2016
U.S. Senator Rand Paul in 2015

Former

U.S. Representatives[edit]

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich in 2014
Former Speaker of the House Paul Ryan in 2018

Current

Former

Governors[edit]

Governor of Kentucky Matt Bevin in 2017
Former Governor of New Jersey Chris Christie in 2015
Governor of West Virginia Jim Justice in 2017
Former Governor of Wisconsin Scott Walker in 2017

Current

Former

Statewide officials[edit]

Current

Former

State legislators[edit]

Current

Former

Mayors[edit]

Current

Former

Local officials[edit]

Other government officials[edit]

Party officials[edit]

Individuals[edit]

Organizations[edit]

Maps[edit]

Current governor endorsements:
  Donald Trump (R)
  Joe Biden (D)
  Kamala Harris (D)
  Cory Booker (D)
  Amy Klobuchar (D)
  Candidate
Current senator endorsements:
  Donald Trump (R)
  Joe Biden (D)
  Elizabeth Warren (D)
  Cory Booker (D)
  Amy Klobuchar (D)
  Bernie Sanders (D)
  Candidate
Current representative endorsements:
  Candidate
  Donald Trump
  Joe Biden
  Cory Booker
  Pete Buttigieg
  Julián Castro
  John Delaney
  Kirsten Gillibrand
  Kamala Harris
  Jay Inslee
  Amy Klobuchar
  Beto O'Rourke
  Bernie Sanders
  Eric Swalwell
  Elizabeth Warren

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  3. ^ Dan Merica. "Trump gears up for 2020 re-election by tightening grip on party". Cnn.com. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  4. ^ http://www.washingtontimes.com, The Washington Times. "RNC unanimously pledges 'undivided support' for Trump, stops short of explicit 2020 endorsement". The Washington Times. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  5. ^ King, Laura (August 6, 2017). "Vice president vehemently denies laying groundwork for potential 2020 White House bid". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 6, 2017.
  6. ^ Bump, Philip (August 23, 2017). "Why Ben Carson's appearance in Phoenix was likely a violation of federal law". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
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  46. ^ Leach, Katie (May 19, 2018). "Glenn Beck dons MAGA hat: I will 'gladly' vote for Trump in 2020". The Washington Examiner. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
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  51. ^ Cernovich, Mike [@Cernovich] (February 3, 2018). "2020 will be the American Dream vs Are You Sure You Don't Want to be a Socialist. The Republic will never be the same" (Tweet). Retrieved February 23, 2018 – via Twitter.
  52. ^ Comm, Joel (April 1, 2019). "Because he actually cares. Go figure".
  53. ^ Covington, Colby [@ColbyCovMMA] (August 3, 2018). "Making history at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. with The Commander in Chief @realdonaldtrump 🇺🇸 #MAGA #GreatAmericanWinningMachine #UFC25Years #ufc227 #Trump2020" (Tweet). Retrieved August 6, 2018 – via Twitter.
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  64. ^ Lahren, Tomi [@TomiLahren] (January 28, 2018). "I don't think Americans will be concerned with how pop stars and rappers feel about Donald Trump when they go to vote in 2020… It's going to be about winning for the American people. Good luck losers. #grammys" (Tweet). Retrieved February 20, 2018 – via Twitter.
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  72. ^ Perelman, Ronald O. (September 27, 2017). "Schedule A-P Itemized Receipts". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved March 2, 2018.
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  74. ^ Reiman, Roy J. (September 6, 2017). "Schedule A-P Itemized Receipts". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  75. ^ Ruffin, Phillip (September 6, 2017). "Schedule A-P Itemized Receipts". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved February 28, 2018.
  76. ^ Shami, Farouk (June 9, 2017). "Schedule A-P Itemized Receipts". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
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