List of Eastern Michigan University buildings

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University Park on campus, in the background is the Rec/IM, Student Center and Lakehouse.

The following is a list of buildings at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan. EMU is home to many notable structures, including three high-rise residence halls and the multi-building Eastern Michigan University Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places.[1] Today EMU is composed of more that 122 buildings across 800 acres (3.2 km2) of its academic and athletic campus.

The oldest remaining buildings on campus are Starkweather Hall and Welch Hall. While the tallest buildings on campus are Hoyt, Hill and Pittman Halls.

Campus[edit]

Starkweather Hall, some time between 1900 and 1909
for the history of Eastern Michigan University see History of Eastern Michigan University

EMU is located in Ypsilanti, a city 35 miles (56 km) west of Detroit and eight miles (13 km) east of Ann Arbor. The university was founded in 1849 and started as Michigan State Normal School. In 1899, it became the Michigan State Normal College when it created the first four-year curriculum for a normal college in the nation. None of the original buildings from the Michigan State Normal School survived. Many of the buildings were wood frame and did not age well.[2] With the additions of departments and the large educational enrollment after WWII, the school became Eastern Michigan College in 1956. This enrollment boosted the number of buildings and residence halls on campus. Between 1900 and the 1950s, around 20 buildings were built on the present day campus. During World War I, the Great Depression and World War II, growth was not hindered.[2] In 1914, Pease Auditorium was built making it the campus' first auditorium. By 1939, residence halls were established allowing students to live on campus.

With the expansion of new academic programs and colleges, new buildings were built. Today the university's site is composed of an academic and athletic campus spread across 800 acres (3.2 km2), with 122 buildings. The EMU campus includes several buildings with sculpture by Corrado Parducci. The oldest remaining building on campus is Starkweather Hall, which opened in 1896,[3] three days before the adjacent Welch Hall.[4] The Ypsilanti Water Tower, built in 1889,[3] while not strictly speaking part of the campus, does border EMU on two sides; the north side of the water tower faces Welch Hall across Cross Street, while the east side of the tower faces a campus parking lot (formerly the site of the EMU gymnasium) across Summit Street.[5] Hoyt, Pittman, and Hill Residence Halls, are the tallest buildings in Ypsilanti by floor count; only the Ypsilanti Water Tower, standing 147 feet tall on the highest ground in Ypsilanti, stands taller.[6][7]

Historic buildings[edit]

Eastern Michigan University's Historic District, which comprises Welch, Starkweather, McKenny and Sherzer halls, these buildings are on the National Register of Historic Places[8] The district was established in 1984.[8]

Pease Auditorium is not part of the Eastern Michigan University Historic District but is also was registered on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984[9]

Academic Buildings[edit]

Many of EMU's colleges are housed in specific buildings. EMU's newest academic building is The Everett L. Marshall Building. EMU's first "green" building on campus. The building features extensive use of natural lighting and stair treads, furnishings, and flooring made of recycled materials. As well, tables, chairs and fabrics throughout the building are made recycled materials. Flooring throughout the building is made from recycled and renewable resources. Other significant buildings include Pray-Harrold, when built in 1969 it was one of the largest classroom buildings in the United States.

Image Building Architect Style Completed Last Major Renovation Current usage Namesake Ref.
MarshallEMUypsi.jpg Everett L. Marshall Building Landberg Associates, Inc. Modern 1999 [10] Academic
(EMU CHHS)
Everett L. Marshall, Dean of Records and Teacher Certification [11]
FordEMUypsilanti.jpg Ford Hall (1967–present), Library (1929–1962), Mark Jefferson Library (1952–1967) Lansing architects Bowd & Munson Colonial Revival Architecture 1929 1982 classrooms, offices, and art gallery, production studio Richard Ford Head of Modern Language Department from 1903 to 1940 [12][13]
Gary M. Owen College of Business Building cropped.jpg Gary M. Owen College of Business Dow, Howell and Gillmore Associates Michigan Modern 1988 Academic
(EMU COB)
Gary M. Owen former Michigan Speaker of the House [14]
Mark Jefferson Science Complex Einhorn, Yaffee Prescott International 1967 2010 Academic Mark Jefferson Geography Department head 1901-39. [15][16]
PeaseAuditoriumEMUYpsilantiMI.jpg Pease Auditorium Smith Hinchman & Grylls Neoclassical 1914 1990s Performance hall Frederic H. Pease professor of music from 1858–1909 and Head of Conservatory at MSNS [13][16][17]
PorterEMUypsilanti.jpg John W. Porter Building (1997–Present)

The Library (1967-1997)

Swanson Associates International 1967 1998 Academic
(EMU COE)
John W. Porter, President from 1979 to 1988 [18][19][19][16]
PrayharoldEMUypsilanti.jpg Pray-Harrold Building Swanson and Associates International 1969 2011 Academic
(EMU CAS)
Carl Esek Pray served as Head of the Logical Science and History Department from 1914 to 1938. Charles F. Harrold served as Professor of English Literature from 1925 to 1943. [16][20][21]
QuarkEMUypsilanti.jpg Quirk Dramatic Arts Building & Sponberg Theater Smith Hinchman & Grylls International/Modern 1959 1984 202-seat theater, Academic, Daniel L. Quirk Jr. Quirk belonged to one the founding families of Ypsilanti. Quirk was updated in 1984 which added Sponberg Theater. Harold Sponberg served as President of Eastern from 1965 to 1974. [13][16][22]
EMU Roosevelt Hall 3.jpg Roosevelt Hall (1973–Present)

Roosevelt High School (1924-1969)

Smith Hinchman & Grylls Colonial Revival & Neoclassical 1924 1973 Academic
(EMU COT)
US President Theodore Roosevelt [13][16][22]
EMUHDYpsilantiMIA.jpg Sherzer Hall & Observatory E. W.. Arnold Late Nineteenth Century Eclectic, Georgian Revival and Victorian Romanesque 1903 1973 and 1989 Academic, astronomical observatory Dr. William H. Sherzer, professor of geology and head of Department of Natural Sciences from 1892-1932. [13][16][23]
Sill Hall Swanson and Associates International style 1965 1980 Academic
(EMU COT)
EMU President John Mayhelm Barry Sill (1886-1893) [16][24][25]
Geddes Town Hall School House.jpg Geddes Town Hall School House Unknown Vernacular 1895 1987 Academic
(EMU COE)
[26]

Administrative and Student Life buildings[edit]

EMU has several administrative buildings that also serve as locations used by students. Bruce T. Halle Library houses one of the largest collections of children's literature in the United States. The building has as an automated retrieval system (the ARC) capable of housing 1 million items. While the most-used books are still on shelves, the majority of the school's books are stored within this system, which runs several stories underneath the library itself. Historical significance includes Welch Hall, Starkweather, and McKenny Union. McKenny was the first student union on the campus of a teachers' college when it opened in 1931. Pierce Hall was dedicated as part of the centennial celebrations of the Normal College in 1949. The residents of Ypsilanti donated the money to construct the 120-foot tower. This was in tradition of Old Pierce Hall. In June 1950 the school installed the Alumni Memorial Chimes. The chimes were donated by the alumni and dedicated to those who died in World War II. Starkweather Hall is the oldest building still standing on EMU's campus and Welch Hall is the second oldest building on campus by three days. In parts of Starkweather, the original doorknobs remain, bearing the initials "SCA" for the Student Christian Association. Starkweather Hall was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

Image Building Architect Style Completed Last Major Renovation Current usage Namesake Ref.
Boonehallypsi.jpg Boone Hall
(1968–present)

Administration Building (1914–1950)
The Arts Building
(1950–1962) Ford Hall (1962–1968)

Smith Hinchman & Grylls Renaissance Revival 1914 1990s Administrative Richard Gause Boone as President of Michigan State Normal College (1893-1899) [13][16]
WMIHalleLibrary.jpg Bruce T. Halle Library Giffels, Hoyem, and Basso, Incorporated Modern 1997 Library Bruce Halle, MSNC alumni and founder and Chairman of the Board of Discount Tire [27][28][29]
McKenny 715.jpg McKenny Hall
(2009–Present)

McKenny Union (1931-2008)

Frank Eurich Jr collegiate gothic & art deco 1931 1963, 1993, 2008 Office Space MSNC President Charles McKenny (1912-1933) [13][30][31]
Peirceypsilantiemu.jpg Pierce Hall R.S. Gerganoff Late Modern / Late International with PWA Modern detailing 1948 1989 Administrative John D. Pierce the first State Superintendent of Instruction from 1836 to 1841 [16]
Eastern michigan university public safety building-hoyt hall2.jpg Public Safety Building (formerly the Hoyt Conference Center) K. F. Leinninger Associates International 1969 2010 Police Department
(EMU DPS)
[16]
EMUstudentCenterYpsilantiMI.jpg Eastern Michigan University Student Center Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Post Modern 2006 Student activity center [16][32][33]
Starkweather Hall 2011 main entrance.jpg Starkweather Hall Malcomson and Higginbotham Richardsonian Romanesque 1895 1961, 1976, 1990 EMU Honors College local philanthropist, Mrs. Starkweather [16][34][35][36]
EMUHDYpsilantiMID.jpg Welch Hall
(1960s-Present)
Training School
(1896-1960s)
Malcomson and Higginbotham Georgian Revival 1896 1988 Administrative Offices, Presidents Office Adonijah S. Welch the First President of Normal Training School [16][34]

Dining[edit]

Eastern has two food courts, an all-you-care-to-eat restaurant, a marketplace, seven cafes, and three convenience stores. The larger dining facilities on campus are geographically located near residence halls.

Image Building Completed Last Major Renovation Dining Style Former Name(s) Ref.
The Commons 1960s 2011 Buffet service style Dining Commons 1 (DC1)
The Eateries 1960 1990s À la carte Dining Commons 2 (DC2)
CrossroadsMPemuYpsilanti.jpg CrossRoads MarketPlace 1969 2008 À la carte, Convenience Store, Einstein Bros Bagels Dining Commons 3 (DC3)
EMUstudentCenterYpsilantiMI.jpg EMU Student Center 2006 Starbucks, GreenMarket Bistro, Salsa Grille, Starbucks, International Kitchen, Convenience store - Lobby Shop, Wendy's, Subway [32]
Eagle Cafe at McKenny Hall À la carte, Convenience Store [37]
Eagle Cafe at Pray-Harrold À la carte, Convenience Store [37]
Eagle Cafe at Alexander Music Building À la carte, Convenience Store [37]
Eagle Cafe at the College of Business À la carte, Convenience Store [37]
Eagle Cafe at (Halle Library) À la carte, Convenience Store [37]
The QuickFixx Convenience Store [37]
Eagle Cafe at Mark Jefferson (The Science Complex) À la carte, Convenience Store [37]
Common Ground Cafe at Marshall Hall À la carte, Convenience Store [37]

Athletic and Recreation buildings[edit]

EMU has several athletic and recreation facilities used to serve in various sporting events and entertainment events. The EMU Convo Center hosts convocation, graduation and various concerts. In 2008, Bruce Springsteen performed at Oestrike Stadium in support of Barack Obama during his Presidential Candidacy. The Lake House "Big Bob's" hosts yearly events and sits in university park which offers an ice skate ring during winter months.

Image Building Designer Completed Last Major Renovation Current usage Seating Namesake Ref.
EMUConvoCenterOUTSIDE.jpg EMU Convo Center Rossetti Associates / The Argos Group December 9, 1998 arena, women's basketballmen's basketball 8,824 Seats [16]
Bowen field house.JPG Bowen Field House Giffels and Vallet 1955 2010 arena for track and field wrestling gymnastics 5,400 Seats Wilbur Pardon Bowen mathematics instructor and first head of the Department of Physical Education, 1894-1928 [16][38]
Ypsilanti township ford lake eagle crest.JPG Eagle Crest Golf Club Karl Litten 1989 1997 Golf Course, Hotel [39][40][41]
Eastern michigan University indoor practice field with polyester roof.JPG Multi-Purpose Air-Supported Indoor Facility (Indoor Practice Facility) BEI Associates, Inc. 2009 Youth soccer, little league baseball, high school football teams, EMU club sports and recreational groups and Six intercollegiate sports (football, baseball, softball, women's soccer and men's and women's golf) [42][43][44]
EMULakehouse.gif Lake House "Big Bob's" M.C. Smith & Associates Architectural Group 1993 Meeting Space, Walking Path, Pond, Sand volleyball courts, ice skating, Relay For Life 800 seat amphitheater "Big Bob's Lake House" after long-time former Rec/IM Director Bob England. [16][45][45][46][47]
The Olds-Robb Recreation-Intramural Complex.jpg Olds-Robb Rec/IM Ralph Calder and Associates, 1982 1991 indoor track, weight rooms, whirlpool, Jones Natatorium Lloyd W. Olds 1916 alumni, Physical Education professor, EMU’s track team coach 1921-42, [16][47][48]
EMU baseball stands.JPG Oestrike Stadium 1971 2007 Baseball Stadium, Softball Stadium, 2,500 seats Ronald E. "Oak" Oestrike former Baseball Coach from 1965 to 87 [49][50]
Olds/Marshall Track 1991 track field, football field 30,200 Seats Lloyd W. Olds and Everett L. Marshall [51]
Rynearsonwide121107.jpg Rynearson Stadium 1969 1994 Football field 30,200 Seats Elton J. Rynearson, Sr. football coach for 26 seasons [16][51][51]
Scicluna Field 2005 women's soccer, youth soccer 700 seats Michigan soccer legend Paul Scicluna [52]

Residence Halls & Apartments[edit]

EMU has 11 on-campus residence halls, 4 on campus apartment buildings, and two university own houses that are occupied during the academic year. Just like many universities, EMU has many residence halls that were built post-World War II. Many of these halls and apartments are named after influential professors and EMU presidents.[53]

Image Building Architect Completed Last Major Renovation Current usage Namesake Ref.
Best Hall Swanson Associates 1960s 1990s Residence Hall Martha Best a professor of Biology and Bacteriology from 1924 to 1952. [16][53]
BrownHallEMICHypsilanti.JPG Brown Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1949 1973 Apartment Complex James M. “Bingo” Brown football and baseball coach from 1923–29 and first dean of men 1925-62. [16][54][55]
BuellHallEMUypsilantiMI.JPG Buell Hall Swanson Associates 1958 1990s Residence Hall Bertha G. Buell Professor of History, English Lit, and Political Science from 1899 to 1937 [16][56]
CornelcortsEMUypsilanti.jpg Cornell Courts Swanson Associates 1961 & 1966 2000s Apartment Complex Located Cornell Courts St. [16]
DowningEMUypsilanti.jpg Downing Hall Swanson Associates 1957 1990s Residence Hall Estelle Downing, professor of English from 1898 to 1938. [16][56]
GoddardHallEMUypsilantiMI.jpg Goddard Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1955 1994 Residence Hall Mary A. Goddard, professor of botany from 1900 to 1939 [16][56][57]

EMUTowersHalls.jpg

Hill Hall K. F. Leinninger Associates 1969 2009 Residence Hall Susan B. Hill Dean of Women from 1939 to 1962 and Dean of Students from 1962 to 1969 [16][58]
600WestForestYpsilantiMiEMU.jpg 600 West Forest (former Presidents House) R.S. Gerganoff 1949 1975 House [59][60][61][62]
601WestForestYpsilantiMI.JPG 601 West Forest (Brinkerhoff-Becker House) Unknown 1863-1869 2010 Apartment Complex George M. Brinkerhoff [59][60][61][62]
Emutowersypsilanti.jpg Hoyt Hall K. F. Leinninger Associates 1969 2012 Residence Hall Charles Oliver Hoyt Professor of Pedagogy and Head of Education Department from 1896 to 1928 [16][63]
Jones Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1948 1994 Residence Hall Dean Lydia I. Jones Dean of Women from 1924 to 1939 [16][57]
King Hall Eastern Michigan University Campus Ypsilanti Michigan.JPG King Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1939 1971 Office Space Julia Anne King Dean of Women from 1881–1886 and Head of History and Social Science Department from 1886-1913. [16][64]
MunsonHallYpsilantiMIEMU.JPG Munson Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1941 1973 Apartment Complex EMU President John M. Munson [16]
PhelpshallEMUypsilanti.jpg Phelps Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1968 2011 Residence Hall Jessie Phelps Professor in the Natural Sciences [16][65]
EMUTowersHalls.jpg Pittman Hall K. F. Leinninger Associates 1969 2011 Residence Hall Marvin Summers Pittman the “father of Lincoln Consolidated School” (a local school district), Director of Rural Education at Normal and an EMU faculty member from 1921-34. [16][66][66]
Putnam Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1968 2011 Residence Hall EMU President Daniel Putnam 1880; 1881–1883; and 1885-1886 [16][65]
SellersHallEMUypsilanti.jpg Sellers Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1968 2011 Residence Hall John A. Sellers Department Head of Chemistry from 1958 to 1964 [16][65]
EMUvillagecomplex.jpg The Village (Oak wood Village Apartments) Post Modern Residential 2001 Apartment Complex Located on Oakwood Street [67]
Walton Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1968 2011 Residence Hall Genevieve Walton university Librarian from 1892 to 1932 [16][68]
WestviewEMUypsilanti.jpg Westview Apartments 1967 & 1969. 2000s Apartment Complex located on Westview Street
WiseHallYpsilantiMiEMU.JPG Wise Hall Swanson Associates 1968 1994 Residence Hall Margaret E. Wise was a first grade teacher-trainer 1893 to 1939 and Director of Placement from 1927 to 1939. [16][56]

Former buildings[edit]

Nine buildings that were once part of EMU's campus no longer stand. These buildings include the Old Main Building, The Conservatory, an unnamed wooden gymnasium, The Old Gymnasium, the Old Post Mansion, the Business and Finance Building and Goodison Hall, both designed by R.S. Gerganoff, and Pine Grove Terrace Apartments.[69] Goodison was among the first dormitories built on Eastern Michigan’s campus.

The finance building went by various names such as the Health Center (from being built to 1961), the Frederick Alexander Music Building (1961–1984), and informally as "Old Alex" after 1980.[70] In 2005, Pine Grove Apartments were removed to make room for the Student Center.

Image Building Architect Completed Demolished Usage Location Ref.
Goodison Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1939 1998 Residence Hall Goodison was demolished to build Marshall Halll [64]
Alexander Hall, EMU, destroyed.jpg Alexander Hall R.S. Gerganoff 1939 Health Center, Music building [71]
Detroit Publishing Company - MSNC Old Gymnasium(02).jpg Old Gymnasium 1896 1965 Gymnasium Old Gymnasium stood in the block bounded by Cross Street, Summit Street, Ellis Street (now Washtenaw Avenue), and Normal Street, near the Ypsilanti Water Tower and Welch and Boone Halls on the EMU campus
Detroit Publishing Company - MSNC Old Main Building.jpg Old Main Building 1852, burned down 1859, rebuilt 1860 classrooms, library, and administration functions The south wing stood near the present location of Boone Hall, the north wing was near the present location of Pierce Hall, and the rear addition reached the location of Ford Hall.
Pine Grove Terrace Swanson Associates 1955 & 1957 2005 Apartment complex Where the EMU Student Center stands today [16]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Heflin, Cindy (2009-06-24). "Eastern Michigan University wins historic preservation award". MLive.com. Retrieved 2010-02-20. 
  2. ^ a b "Historic Tour". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  3. ^ a b History of Campus Buildings: Chronological Tour, 1852-Present, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02 
  4. ^ Starkweather Hall, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02, "Starkweather is the oldest building on campus; it is three days older than the adjacent Welch Hall." 
  5. ^ Maps of the Campus through the years, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02 
  6. ^ Hoyt/Pittman/Hill Residence Halls & Conference Center, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02 
  7. ^ Water Tower, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02 
  8. ^ a b "NRHP Emich Michigan Historic District". NRHP Emich Michigan Historic District. Retrieved 1 April 2012. 
  9. ^ "NRHP EMU". NRHP EMU. 
  10. ^ "Marshall Hall". Marshall Hall. emich. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  11. ^ "Everett L. Marshall Building". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  12. ^ "Ford Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g Eastern Michigan University, ‘’Vital statistics Regarding Campus Buildings’’ August 24, 1964, document in EMU Archives.
  14. ^ "Gary M. Owen College of Business". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  15. ^ Alfaro, Bryan (2011-06-27), "Campus updates to be finished by Fall '11", The Eastern Echo, retrieved 2011-07-09, "While Mark Jefferson’s science complex addition was opened last December, renovations to the “old” section of the Mark Jefferson building are ongoing and are expected to be substantially completed by the Fall 2012 semester." 
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak "Emich historic tour". Emich historic tour building info. Emich historic tour. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  17. ^ "Historic Tour: Pease Auditorium". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  18. ^ "College of Education: Undergraduate Programs". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  19. ^ a b "Porter College of Education". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  20. ^ "Pray-Harrold Building". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  21. ^ "EMU Pray Harold Kiosk". EMU Pray Harold Kiosk Campus Tradition. EMU student government. Retrieved 18 June 2011. 
  22. ^ a b "Quirk Dramatic Arts Building". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  23. ^ "Historic Tour: Sherzer Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  24. ^ Chronological Tour: Sill Hall, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2012-07-11 
  25. ^ Virtual Tour: Sill Hall, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2012-07-11 
  26. ^ Emich 1 room schoolhouse. "Emich 1 room schoolhouse". Emich 1 room schoolhouse. emich.edu. Retrieved 30 June 2013. 
  27. ^ "Forbes profile". Forbes. 2012-04-18. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  28. ^ "Eastern Michigan University biography". Emich.edu. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  29. ^ "Emich Archives Halle Library". Emich Archives. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  30. ^ "Charles McKenny Hall Dedicated Today", The Ypsilanti Daily Press, 1931-10-24, retrieved 2011-02-12 
  31. ^ German, Pamela; Robinson, Veronica (Spring 2009), "Charles McKenny Union: An EMU Icon" (PDF), Ypsilanti Gleanings (Ypsilanti Historical Society): 14–15, retrieved 2011-02-12 
  32. ^ a b "EMU Student Center: About Us". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  33. ^ "Emich Archives EMU Student Center". Emich Archives EMU Student Center. Emich Archives. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  34. ^ a b "Welch Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  35. ^ "Historic Tour: Starkweather Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  36. ^ "Starkweather Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h "EMU Dining Locations". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  38. ^ "EMU Archives Bowen Field House". EMU Archives Bowen Field House. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  39. ^ "Eagle Crest Resort". Eagle Crest Resort. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  40. ^ "Ann Arbor Marriott Ypsilanti at Eagle Crest". Marriott. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  41. ^ "Emich Archives Eagle Crest". Emich Archives Eagle Crest. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  42. ^ "Welcome to the Eastern Michigan Indoor Practice Facility". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  43. ^ "EMU indoor practice facility pays dividends for community, University athletics". Eastern Michigan University. 2011-05-25. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  44. ^ "EMU Practice facility". EMU Practice facility. EMU Archives. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  45. ^ a b "Historic Tour: Pond and Lake House". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  46. ^ "Bob's Lake House and Pond". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  47. ^ a b Robinson-Jones, Theodora (2011-06-27), "REC-IM director retires", The Eastern Echo, retrieved 2011-07-09 
  48. ^ "emich archives REC IM". emich archives REC IM. Retrieved 18 July 2012. 
  49. ^ "Oestrike Stadium". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  50. ^ "Five to be inducted into E-Club Athletic Hall of Fame". Focus EMU Online. Eastern Michigan University. 2009-02-10. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  51. ^ a b c "Olds / Marshall Track". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  52. ^ "Scicluna Field Consturction". Scicluna Field Consturction. Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  53. ^ a b "Best Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  54. ^ "Cornell Court Apartments". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  55. ^ "Historic Tour: Brown/Munson Residence Halls". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  56. ^ a b c d "Buell Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  57. ^ a b "Jones Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  58. ^ "Hill Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  59. ^ a b "Historic Tour: 600 W. Forest Street". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  60. ^ a b "601 west forest". 601 west forest. Retrieved 4 January 2012. 
  61. ^ a b "NRHP Brinkerhoff-Becker". NRHP Brinkerhoff-Becker. 
  62. ^ a b "Guide to Apartment Living 2012-2013". Eastern Michigan University. Archived from the original on 2012-09-15. Retrieved 2013-11-02. 
  63. ^ Gershman, Dave (2010-05-16). "As Pray-Harrold work begins, Eastern Michigan University professors settle into temporary digs". AnnArbor.com. Retrieved 2010-08-31. 
  64. ^ a b "King Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  65. ^ a b c "Sellers Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  66. ^ a b "Pittman Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  67. ^ "Village Apartments". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  68. ^ "Walton Residence Hall". Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved 2011-06-14. 
  69. ^ Pine Grove Terrace Apartments, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02 
  70. ^ Buildings that no longer exist, Eastern Michigan University, retrieved 2011-06-02 
  71. ^ Eastern Michigan University, ‘’Vital statistics Regarding Campus Buildings’’, compiled by Egbert R. Isbell, August 24, 1964, document in EMU Archives.