List of FIFA World Cup finals

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FIFA World Cup Final
France champion of the Football World Cup Russia 2018.jpg
France celebrating after their win against Croatia in the 2018 final
Founded1930; 91 years ago (1930)
Current champions France (2nd title)
Most successful team(s) Brazil (5 titles)

The FIFA World Cup is an international association football competition contested by the men's national teams of the member nations of the FIFA, the sport's global governing body. Established in 1930, it has been held every four years ever since, except in 1942 and 1946.

The World Cup final match is the last one of the competition, played by the only two teams remaining in contention, and the result determines which country is declared the world champion. It is a one-off match decided in regulation time; in case of a tie, extra time is used, followed if needed by a penalty shoot-out under the current rules.[1] Until 1982, finals still level after extra time would have been replayed, although this never proved necessary. The golden goal rule would have applied during extra time in 1998 and 2002, but was not put in practice either.

The only exception to this type of format was the 1950 World Cup, which featured a final round-robin group of four teams; the decisive match of that group is often regarded as the de facto final of that tournament, including by FIFA itself.[2]

The winning team receives the FIFA World Cup Trophy, and its name is engraved on the bottom side of the trophy.[3] Throughout the twenty-one editions of the World Cup, thirteen nations have reached the final, and eight have won. Brazil is the most successful team having won the title five times;[4] Italy and Germany[n 1] have four titles each; Uruguay, Argentina and current champion France have two each; while England and Spain have one each. Czechoslovakia,[n 2] Hungary, Sweden, the Netherlands and Croatia have played in the final without winning. The team with the most appearances in the final overall is Germany, with eight. No team from outside Europe (UEFA) or South America (CONMEBOL) has made it to the final.

List of finals[edit]

Key to the list
a.e.t. Match was won during extra time
pen. Match was won on a penalty shoot-out
List of finals of the FIFA World Cup
Year Winners Score[2] Runners-up Venue Location Attendance Refs
1930 Uruguay  4–2  Argentina Estadio Centenario Montevideo, Uruguay 80,000 [5][6]
1934 Italy  2–1 (a.e.t.)  Czechoslovakia Stadio Nazionale PNF Rome, Italy 50,000 [7][8]
1938 Italy  4–2  Hungary Stade Olympique de Colombes Colombes (Paris), France 45,000 [9][10]
1950 Uruguay  2–1
[n 3]
 Brazil Maracanã Stadium Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 173,850 [11][12]
1954 West Germany  3–2  Hungary Wankdorf Stadium Bern, Switzerland 60,000 [13][14]
1958 Brazil  5–2  Sweden Råsunda Stadium Solna (Stockholm), Sweden 51,800 [15][16]
1962 Brazil  3–1  Czechoslovakia Estadio Nacional Santiago, Chile 69,000 [17][18]
1966 England  4–2 (a.e.t.)  West Germany Wembley Stadium London, England 96,924 [19][20]
1970 Brazil  4–1  Italy Estadio Azteca Mexico City, Mexico 107,412 [21][22]
1974 West Germany  2–1  Netherlands Olympiastadion Munich, West Germany 75,200 [23][24]
1978 Argentina  3–1 (a.e.t.)  Netherlands Estadio Monumental Buenos Aires, Argentina 71,483 [25][26]
1982 Italy  3–1  West Germany Santiago Bernabéu Madrid, Spain 90,000 [27][28]
1986 Argentina  3–2  West Germany Estadio Azteca Mexico City, Mexico 114,600 [29][30]
1990 West Germany  1–0  Argentina Stadio Olimpico Rome, Italy 73,603 [31][32]
1994 Brazil  0–0 (a.e.t.)
(3–2 pen.)
 Italy Rose Bowl Pasadena (Los Angeles), United States 94,194 [33][34]
1998 France  3–0  Brazil Stade de France Saint-Denis (Paris), France 80,000 [35][36]
2002 Brazil  2–0  Germany International Stadium Yokohama, Japan 69,029 [37][38]
2006 Italy  1–1 (a.e.t.)
(5–3 pen.)
 France Olympiastadion Berlin, Germany 69,000 [39][40]
2010 Spain  1–0 (a.e.t.)  Netherlands Soccer City Johannesburg, South Africa 84,490 [41][42]
2014 Germany  1–0 (a.e.t.)  Argentina Maracanã Stadium Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 74,738 [43][44]
2018 France  4–2  Croatia Luzhniki Stadium Moscow, Russia 78,011 [45][46]
Upcoming finals
Year Finalists Match Finalists Venue Location Attendance Refs
2022 v Lusail Iconic Stadium Lusail (Doha), Qatar
2026 v MetLife Stadium East Rutherford (New Jersey), United States

Results[edit]

Map of winning countries
Results by nation
Team Winners Runners-up Total finals Years won Years runners-up
 Brazil 5 2 7 1958, 1962, 1970, 1994, 2002 1950, 1998
 Germany[n 1] 4 4 8 1954, 1974, 1990, 2014 1966, 1982, 1986, 2002
 Italy 4 2 6 1934, 1938, 1982, 2006 1970, 1994
 Argentina 2 3 5 1978, 1986 1930, 1990, 2014
 France 2 1 3 1998, 2018 2006
 Uruguay 2 0 2 1930, 1950
 Spain 1 0 1 2010
 England 1 0 1 1966
 Netherlands 0 3 3 1974, 1978, 2010
 Czech Republic[n 2] 0 2 2 1934, 1962
 Hungary 0 2 2 1938, 1954
 Sweden 0 1 1 1958
 Croatia 0 1 1 2018
Results by confederation
Confederation Appearances Winners Runners-up
UEFA 28 12 16
CONMEBOL 14 9 5

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Germany inherited the records of the former West Germany team.
  2. ^ a b The records of the former Czechoslovakia team were ultimately inherited by the Czech Republic.
  3. ^ Actually not a final but the decisive match of the final group stage.

References[edit]

General

  • "World Cup 1930-2018". Rec. Sport. Soccer Statistics Foundation (RSSSF). 9 August 2018.

Specific

  1. ^ "Laws of the Game" (PDF). FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 December 2008. Retrieved 9 February 2009.
  2. ^ a b "FIFA World Cup Finals since 1930" (PDF). FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 May 2011. Retrieved 3 February 2009.
  3. ^ "Taça da Copa do Mundo chega ao Brasil (World Cup trophy arrives in Brazil)". Globo TV. 21 April 2014. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 22 April 2014.
  4. ^ "World Cup Spotlight on Brazil". CNN. Archived from the original on 1 April 2013. Retrieved 29 January 2007.
  5. ^ "1930 FIFA World Cup Uruguay". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 20 October 2007. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  6. ^ "World Cup history – Uruguay 1930". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 18 June 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  7. ^ "1934 FIFA World Cup Italy". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 23 March 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  8. ^ "World Cup history – Italy 1934". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 16 May 2007. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  9. ^ "1938 FIFA World Cup France". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 21 January 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  10. ^ "World Cup history – France 1938". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 28 September 2006. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  11. ^ "1950 FIFA World Cup Brazil". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 10 February 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  12. ^ "World Cup history – Brazil 1950". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  13. ^ "1954 FIFA World Cup Switzerland". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 20 July 2012. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  14. ^ "World Cup history – Switzerland 1954". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  15. ^ "1958 FIFA World Cup Sweden". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 17 February 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  16. ^ "World Cup history – Sweden 1958". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 18 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  17. ^ "1962 FIFA World Cup Chile". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 17 February 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  18. ^ "World Cup history – Chile 1962". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 24 January 2008. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  19. ^ "1966 FIFA World Cup England". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 25 March 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  20. ^ "World Cup history – England 1966". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 27 December 2007. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  21. ^ "1970 FIFA World Cup Mexico". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 25 January 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  22. ^ "World Cup history – Mexico 1970". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 20 June 2006. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  23. ^ "1974 FIFA World Cup Germany". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 26 January 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  24. ^ "World Cup history – Germany 1974". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 27 March 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  25. ^ "1978 FIFA World Cup Argentina". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 12 February 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  26. ^ "World Cup history – Argentina 1978". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  27. ^ "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 30 January 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  28. ^ "World Cup history – Spain 1982". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 3 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  29. ^ "1986 FIFA World Cup Mexico". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 29 January 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  30. ^ "World Cup history – Mexico 1986". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 19 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  31. ^ "1990 FIFA World Cup Italy". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 15 November 2013. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  32. ^ "World Cup history – Italy 1990". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 24 January 2008. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  33. ^ "1994 FIFA World Cup USA". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 2 February 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  34. ^ "World Cup history – USA 1994". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 2 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  35. ^ "1998 FIFA World Cup France". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  36. ^ "World Cup history – France 1998". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 3 February 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  37. ^ "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 30 January 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  38. ^ "World Cup history – Japan & South Korea 2002". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 13 April 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  39. ^ "2006 FIFA World Cup Germany". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 19 August 2011. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  40. ^ "Zidane off as Italy win World Cup". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). 4 May 2006. Archived from the original on 16 June 2020. Retrieved 26 January 2009.
  41. ^ "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). Archived from the original on 11 July 2010. Retrieved 12 May 2012.
  42. ^ "Netherlands 0–1 Spain (aet)". BBC Sport (British Broadcasting Corporation). Archived from the original on 11 May 2019. Retrieved 12 May 2012.
  43. ^ "Estadio Do Maracana, Rio de Janeiro". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). 18 January 2012. Archived from the original on 16 May 2019. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  44. ^ McNulty, Phil (13 July 2014). "Germany 1–0 Argentina". BBC Sport. BBC. Archived from the original on 20 July 2014. Retrieved 19 July 2014.
  45. ^ "Formidable France secure second title". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). 15 July 2018. Archived from the original on 15 July 2018. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  46. ^ "More than half the world watched record-breaking 2018 World Cup". FIFA.com (Fédération Internationale de Football Association). 21 December 2018. Archived from the original on 4 June 2019. Retrieved 4 June 2019.

External links[edit]