List of Federalist Party presidential tickets

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This is a list of Federalist Party candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States.

List of Federalist tickets[edit]

Election Presidential Candidate[1][2] Vice presidential candidate[1][2]
Candidate
(Birth–Death)
Office at time
of election[a]
Home
State[b]
EV%[c] Candidate
(Birth–Death)
Office at time
of election[a]
Home
State[b]
EV%[d]
1796[e] John Adams
(1735–1826)[4]
John Adams Vice President MA 51.4% Thomas Pinckney
(1750–1828)[5]
Thomas Pinckney (cropped 3x4).jpg Fmr. Ambassador SC 43.7%
1800[f] John Adams
(1735–1826)[4]
John Adams President MA 47.1% Charles C. Pinckney
(1746–1825)[7]
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Fmr. Ambassador SC 36.4%
1804 Charles C. Pinckney
(1746–1825)[7]
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Fmr. Ambassador SC 8% Rufus King
(1755–1827)[8]
Unsuccessful 1816.jpg Fmr. Ambassador NY 8%
1808 26.7% 26.7%
1812[g] DeWitt Clinton
(1769–1828)[11]
DeWitt Clinton Lieutenant Governor
and Mayor[h]
NY 40.8% Jared Ingersoll
(1749–1822)[12]
Jared Ingersoll (cropped 3x4).jpg State attorney general[i] PA 39.4%
1816[j] Rufus King
(1755–1827)[14]
Rufus King Senator NY 15.4% John E. Howard
(1752–1827)[15]
Johneagerhoward (cropped).jpg Fmr. Senator MD 10%

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The most recent elective office, or senior appointive position, held by the candidate either on election day or in November of the election year.
  2. ^ a b State of primary residence.
  3. ^ For elections held prior to 1804, this column represents the share of electors who cast a vote for the candidate. For elections held since 1804, this column represents the share of the total electoral vote for president won by the candidate.
  4. ^ For elections held prior to 1804, this column represents the share of electors who cast a vote for the candidate. For elections held since 1804, this column represents the share of the total electoral vote for vice president won by the candidate.
  5. ^ Prior to the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804, each member of the Electoral College cast two votes, with no distinction made between votes for president and votes for vice president.[2] Federalist leaders agreed to support a ticket of John Adams and Thomas Pinckney, though it is unclear whether they formally nominated the ticket at a congressional nominating caucus.[3] Ultimately, Adams won the most electoral votes and became president. Because Democratic-Republican candidate Thomas Jefferson won more electoral votes than Pinckney, he was elected as vice president.[2]
  6. ^ Prior to the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804, each member of the Electoral College cast two votes, with no distinction made between votes for president and votes for vice president.[2] The Federalist congressional nominating caucus nominated a ticket of Adams and Charles C. Pinckney. Though the party did not officially nominate either candidate for president or vice president, most Federalists favored Adams for president and Pinckney for vice president.[6] Ultimately, Adams won 65 electoral votes and Pinckney won 64 electoral votes.[2]
  7. ^ Clinton was a Northern Democratic-Republican who challenged the incumbent Democratic-Republican president, James Madison, in the general election.[9] Clinton was nominated for president by a legislative caucus of New York Democratic-Republicans, and much of his support came from Democratic-Republicans dissatisfied with Madison's leadership in the War of 1812. The Federalist Party did not officially nominate Clinton, but most Federalist leaders tacitly supported Clinton's candidacy in hopes of defeating Madison.[10]
  8. ^ In 1812, Clinton simultaneously held the positions of Mayor of New York City and Lieutenant Governor of New York. He had also previously served in the United States Senate.
  9. ^ Ingersoll had also served as a delegate to the Continental Congress and to the Constitutional Convention.[12]
  10. ^ The Federalists did not nominate a ticket in 1816, though some Federalists were elected to serve as presidential electors. A majority of the Federalist electors cast their presidential vote for King and their vice presidential vote for Howard.[13]

Other candidates[edit]

In addition to the candidates listed above, other Federalists received electoral votes between 1796 and 1820. In the 1796 election, Oliver Ellsworth, John Jay, James Iredell, Samuel Johnston, and Charles Cotesworth Pinckney all received at least one electoral vote. Jay also received a single vote in the 1800 election. In the 1816 election, Robert Goodloe Harper, John Marshall, and James Ross all received electoral votes for vice president. In the 1820 election, Richard Stockton, Robert Goodloe Harper, Daniel Rodney, and Richard Rush all received at least one electoral vote for vice president.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996". National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "United States Presidential Election Results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  3. ^ Morgan (1969), pp. 185–186
  4. ^ a b "Adams, John, (1735–1826)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 21 September 2018.
  5. ^ "PINCKNEY, Thomas, (1750 - 1828)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
  6. ^ Morgan (1969), p. 186
  7. ^ a b "Charles Cotesworth Pinckney". Biography.com. A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  8. ^ "KING, Rufus, (1755 - 1827)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  9. ^ Morgan (1969), pp. 191–193
  10. ^ Siry (1985), pp. 457–460
  11. ^ "Clinton, De Witt, (1769–1828)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  12. ^ a b "INGERSOLL, Jared, (1749 - 1822)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
  13. ^ Deskins et al. (2010), pp. 65
  14. ^ "King, Rufus, (1755–1827)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 21, 2018.
  15. ^ "HOWARD, John Eager, (1752 - 1827)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. United States Congress. Retrieved September 26, 2018.

Works cited[edit]

  • Deskins, Donald Richard; Walton, Hanes; Puckett, Sherman (2010). Presidential Elections, 1789-2008: County, State, and National Mapping of Election Data. University of Michigan Press. ISBN 978-0472116973.
  • Morgan, William G. (1969). "The Origin and Development of the Congressional Nominating Caucus". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 113 (2): 184–196. JSTOR 985965.
  • Siry, Steven Edwin (1985). "The Sectional Politics of "Practical Republicanism": De Witt Clinton's Presidential Bid, 1810–1812". Journal of the Early Republic. 5 (4): 441–462. JSTOR 3123061.