List of Fort Hays State Tigers head football coaches

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An "Honorable Mention" All-American player for the Nebraska Cornhuskers, Andrew Frank Schoeppel was head football coach at Fort Hays State for the 1929 season, garnering a record of 2–5. He later became the 29th Governor of Kansas.

The Fort Hays State Tigers football program is a college football team that represents Fort Hays State University in the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association, a part of NCAA Division II. The team has had 23 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1902.[1] After it was announced that head coach Kevin Verdugo would not return for the 2011 season,[2] Chris Brown was announced as the new head coach.[3]

The coach with the most wins for the team was Bob Cortese with 55, and James J. Yeager had the highest winning percentage at .800 in 1935. Wayne J. McConnell coached the most games for the school, 155 games total from 1956 through 1968. One year coach Andrew Frank Schoeppel went on to become the 29th Governor of Kansas from 1943 to 1947 and a U.S. Senator from 1949 until his death. Jim Gilstrap went on to a successful coaching career in the Canadian Football League.

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
No. Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

Statistics correct as of the end of the 2016 college football season.

No. Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs Awards
0 No Coach 1902–1912 28 11 10 7 .518
1 Ira Van Cleave 1913–1914 13 9 4 0 .692
2 W. G. Speer 1915–1918 24 18 6 0 .750 1
3 A. J. Robertson 1919 9 3 6 0 .333
4 Ralph Archer 1920 8 2 5 1 .313
5 George Woodward 1921–1922 14 8 5 1 .607 1
6 William D. "Bill" Weidein 1923–1928 49 19 25 5 .439
7 Andrew Schoeppel 1929 7 2 5 0 .286
8 W. C. "Jack" Riley 1930–1934 46 21 19 6 .522 1
9 James J. "Jim" Yeager 1935 10 8 2 0 .800 1
10 Paul D. Waldorf 1936–1941 54 25 21 8 .537 1
11 Bill Bearly 1942 9 1 8 0 .111
12 Ralph Huffman 1946–1955 88 41 37 10 .523 1
13 Wayne J. McConnell 1956–1968 115 45 67 3 .404 1
14 Tom Stromgren 1969–1971 29 7 21 1 .259
15 Bill Giles 1972–1978 71 24 44 3 .359 1
16 Bobby Thompson 1979–1980, 1984 31 9 20 2 .323
17 Jim Gilstrap 1981–1983 32 20 11 1 .641
18 John Vincent 1985–1989 50 22 26 2 .460
19 Bob Cortese 1990–1997 90 55 32 3 .628 2
20 Jeff Leiker 1998–2000 32 13 19 0 .406
21 Tim O'Connor 2001–2004 44 20 24 0 .455
22 Kevin Verdugo 2005–2010 64 18 47 0 .277
23 Chris Brown 2011–present 67 38 29 0 .567 34 27 .557 0 1

Table statistics[1]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[4]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[5]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b DeLassus, David. "Fort Hays State Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on May 25, 2011. Retrieved March 20, 2011. 
  2. ^ Clark, Kevin (November 10, 2010). "Fort Hays football coach Kevin Verdugo will not return in 2011". Pittsburg Morning Sun. Retrieved November 17, 2010. 
  3. ^ Nicholl, Connor (December 11, 2010). "Football: Fort Hays State introduces Brown". Salina Journal. Retrieved January 12, 2011. 
  4. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  5. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  6. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009.