List of French Open singles finalists during the open era

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French Open Singles Finalists
Location
Created 1968
(51 finals, including 2018)
Men's Most 11: Rafael Nadal
Men's Most Consecutive 5: Rafael Nadal
Women's Most 9: Chris Evert
Steffi Graf
Women's Most Consecutive 4: Chris Evert
Martina Navratilova
Steffi Graf
Most Meetings Men's (4 times):
Nadal vs. Federer (4-0)
Women's (4 times):
Evert vs. Navratilova (3-1)
Official website

The French Open is a Grand Slam held in Paris at the Stade Roland Garros in the administrative district of XVIe.[1] The tournament was first held in 1891 for the men and 1897 for the women's, and has only ceased being played during the two world wars.[1] This tournament first became part of the Open Era in 1968, which was the first slam to open up to professional tennis players in their competition.[1]

The French Open Men's Finals have had many top players playing in them such as six-time finalist (and winner) Björn Borg, eleven-time finalist (and winner) Rafael Nadal, five-time finalists Ivan Lendl, Mats Wilander and Roger Federer, and four-time finalists Guillermo Vilas and Novak Djokovic.[2] Borg won four straight finals appearances 1978–1981, which was a record that Nadal tied in 2008 and 2013, and beat in 2014. Lendl won three finals during the 1980s, after losing his first final to Borg in 1981. Wilander had the same record in the finals as Lendl, they met twice in finals.[2] Wilander was victorious in 1985, but in 1987 Lendl was the champion.[2] Nadal won four straight final appearances from 2005 to 2008, and he won five straight final appearances from 2010 to 2014.[2] However, Federer went on to capture the career grand slam in 2009, which Nadal lost out to Robin Söderling, who went on to the final to play Federer.[2] Vilas won one of his four final appearances, but did not do this consecutively like Federer.[2] Federer and Djokovic lost their first three final appearances before winning it in his fourth finals try.[2]

The French Open Women's Finals have had many top players playing in them such as Chris Evert and Steffi Graf, both nine-time finalists, six-time finalists Arantxa Sánchez Vicario and Martina Navratilova, and Justine Henin, Monica Seles and Serena Williams being four-time finalists.[3] Evert went on to win seven finals, a record among women, in which she played Navratilova in four finals winning three in 1975, 1985, and 1986.[3] Navratilova won two titles at the event in 1982 and 1984, which she beat Evert in 1984 one.[3] Graf won six finals, which she beat Navratilova in 1987, their lone encounter.[3] In addition, Graf played Seles in 1990 and 1992, with Seles winning both.[3] Furthermore, Graf played Sánchez Vicario in three finals, with Graf winning in 1995 and 1996.[3] Seles beat Sánchez Vicario in 1991, but in 1998 Sánchez Vicario defeated her in the finals.[3] Sánchez Vicario won three titles at the event, and also lost three finals.[3] Henin won three straight, which is a woman's co-record at the event matching Seles, but during the four wins and three consecutive she did not play the same opponent twice.[3] Henin won her second title in 2005 against 2000 champion Mary Pierce, and the last two opponents she defeated, Svetlana Kuznetsova in 2006 final, and Ana Ivanovic in 2007 final, went on to win in 2009 and 2008 respectively.[3]

Men[edit]

The French Open Men's Singles Finals have been competed in by 51 various competitors from 21 separate nationalities over the 51 year time period this event has been staged.[2] The most dominant finalist nations are Spain and Sweden, other mildly successful competing nations are the United States, Czechoslovakia, and Argentina.[2]

  • * = Champion
Rafael Nadal has been an eleven-time finalist overall, winning every time, and both a five-time and four-time consecutive finalist.
A brown-haired man in a white polo shirt
Björn Borg has been a six-time finalist overall, and a four-time consecutive finalist, and won all of those finals.
Ivan Lendl was a five-time finalist (three wins, two losses).
Mats Wilander was a five-time finalist (three wins, two losses).
Roger Federer has been a five-time finalist (one win, four losses).
Novak Djokovic has been a four-time finalist (one win, three losses).
Player Nationality Appearances Win-Loss Year(s)
Rafael Nadal  Spain 11 11–0 2005*, 2006*, 2007*, 2008*, 2010*, 2011*, 2012*, 2013*, 2014*, 2017*, 2018*
Björn Borg  Sweden 6 6–0 1974*, 1975*, 1978*, 1979*, 1980*, 1981*
Ivan Lendl  Czechoslovakia 5 3–2 1981, 1984*, 1985, 1986*, 1987*
Mats Wilander  Sweden 5 3–2 1982*, 1983, 1985*, 1987, 1988*
Roger Federer   Switzerland 5 1–4 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009*, 2011
Guillermo Vilas  Argentina 4 1–3 1975, 1977*, 1978, 1982
Novak Djokovic  Serbia 4 1–3 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016*
Gustavo Kuerten  Brazil 3 3–0 1997*, 2000*, 2001*
Jim Courier  United States 3 2–1 1991*, 1992*, 1993
Sergi Bruguera  Spain 3 2–1 1993*, 1994*, 1997
Andre Agassi  United States 3 1–2 1990, 1991, 1999*
Jan Kodeš  Czechoslovakia 2 2–0 1970*, 1971*
Ken Rosewall  Australia 2 1–1 1968*, 1969
Rod Laver  Australia 2 1–1 1968, 1969*
Ilie Năstase  Romania 2 1–1 1971, 1973*
Michael Chang  United States 2 1–1 1989*, 1995
Juan Carlos Ferrero  Spain 2 1–1 2002, 2003*
Stan Wawrinka   Switzerland 2 1–1 2015*, 2017
Àlex Corretja  Spain 2 0–2 1998, 2001
Robin Söderling  Sweden 2 0–2 2009, 2010
Andrés Gimeno  Spain 1 1–0 1972*
Adriano Panatta  Italy 1 1–0 1976*
Yannick Noah  France 1 1–0 1983*
Andrés Gómez  Ecuador 1 1–0 1990*
Thomas Muster  Austria 1 1–0 1995*
Yevgeny Kafelnikov  Russia 1 1–0 1996*
Carlos Moyá  Spain 1 1–0 1998*
Albert Costa  Spain 1 1–0 2002*
Gastón Gaudio  Argentina 1 1–0 2004*
Željko Franulović  Yugoslavia 1 0–1 1970
Patrick Proisy  France 1 0–1 1972
Nikola Pilić  Yugoslavia 1 0–1 1973
Manuel Orantes  Spain 1 0–1 1974
Harold Solomon  United States 1 0–1 1976
Brian Gottfried  United States 1 0–1 1977
Víctor Pecci  Paraguay 1 0–1 1979
Vitas Gerulaitis  United States 1 0–1 1980
John McEnroe  United States 1 0–1 1984
Mikael Pernfors  Sweden 1 0–1 1986
Henri Leconte  France 1 0–1 1988
Stefan Edberg  Sweden 1 0–1 1989
Petr Korda  Czechoslovakia 1 0–1 1992
Alberto Berasategui  Spain 1 0–1 1994
Michael Stich  Germany 1 0–1 1996
Andrei Medvedev  Ukraine 1 0–1 1999
Magnus Norman  Sweden 1 0–1 2000
Martin Verkerk  Netherlands 1 0–1 2003
Guillermo Coria  Argentina 1 0–1 2004
Mariano Puerta  Argentina 1 0–1 2005
David Ferrer  Spain 1 0–1 2013
Andy Murray  Great Britain 1 0–1 2016
Dominic Thiem  Austria 1 0–1 2018

Most recent final[edit]

Year Nationality Winner Nationality Runner-up
2018  Spain Rafael Nadal  Austria Dominic Thiem

Multiple-time opponents in the open era[edit]

Opponents Record Finals meetings
Australia Rod Laver Australia Ken Rosewall 1–1 1968 (Rosewall), 1969 (Laver)
Sweden Björn Borg Argentina Guillermo Vilas 2–0 1975, 1978
Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl Sweden Mats Wilander 1–1 1985 (Wilander), 1987 (Lendl)
Spain Rafael Nadal Switzerland Roger Federer 4–0 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011
Spain Rafael Nadal Serbia Novak Djokovic 2–0 2012, 2014

Most consecutive finals in the open era[edit]

Country Player Number Years Results
Won Lost
 Spain Rafael Nadal 5 2010–14 5 0
 Sweden Björn Borg 4 1978–81 4 0
 Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl 4 1984–87 3 1
 Spain Rafael Nadal 4 2005–08 4 0
  Switzerland Roger Federer 4 2006–09 1 3
 United States Jim Courier 3 1991–93 2 1
 Serbia Novak Djokovic 3 2014–16 1 2
 Australia Rod Laver 2 1968–69 1 1
 Australia Ken Rosewall 2 1968–69 1 1
 Czechoslovakia Jan Kodeš 2 1970–71 2 0
 Sweden Björn Borg 2 1974–75 2 0
 Argentina Guillermo Vilas 2 1977–78 1 1
 Sweden Mats Wilander 2 1982–83 1 1
 Sweden Mats Wilander 2 1987–88 1 1
 United States Andre Agassi 2 1990–91 0 2
 Spain Sergi Bruguera 2 1993–94 2 0
 Brazil Gustavo Kuerten 2 2000–01 2 0
 Spain Juan Carlos Ferrero 2 2002–03 1 1
 Sweden Robin Söderling 2 2009–10 0 2
 Spain Rafael Nadal 2 2017–18 2 0

Bolded years indicates active or current streak

Women[edit]

The French Open Women's Singles Finals have consisted of 48 separate competitors from 17 nationalities in the 51 meetings that have taken place at the event.[3] The eras of dominance are the following: United States and Yugoslavia in different eras, Australia in the 1970s, Germany and Spain in the 1980s and 1990s, and Belgium and Russia in the 2000s.[3]

  • * = Champion
A blonde-haired female tennis player with multi-colored shorts and a black shirt, with the tennis racket out in front of her
Chris Evert was a nine-time finalist (seven wins, two losses).
Steffi Graf was a nine-time finalist (six wins, three losses).
A woman in all white dress, white jacket, and white headband, which she is holding a blue tennis racket
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario, was a six-time finalist (three wins, three losses).
Martina Navratilova was a six-time finalist (four losses, and two wins).
Justine Henin has been a four-time finalist winner (three consecutive).
Monica Seles was a four-time finalist (three wins, one loss).
Serena Williams has been a four-time finalist (three wins, one loss).
Player Nationality Appearances Win-Loss Year(s)
Chris Evert  United States 9 7–2 1973, 1974*, 1975*, 1979*, 1980*, 1983*, 1984, 1985*, 1986*
Steffi Graf  Germany 9 6–3 1987*, 1988*, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1993*, 1995*, 1996*, 1999*
Arantxa Sánchez Vicario  Spain 6 3–3 1989*, 1991, 1994*, 1995, 1996, 1998*
Martina Navratilova  United States[a] 6 2–4 1975, 1982*, 1984*, 1985, 1986, 1987
Justine Henin  Belgium 4 4–0 2003*, 2005*, 2006*, 2007*
Monica Seles  Yugoslavia[b] 4 3–1 1990*, 1991*, 1992*, 1998
Serena Williams  United States 4 3–1 2002*, 2013*, 2015*, 2016
Margaret Court  Australia 3 3–0 1969*, 1970*, 1973*
Maria Sharapova  Russia 3 2–1 2012*, 2013, 2014*
Mima Jaušovec  Yugoslavia 3 1–2 1977*, 1978, 1983
Simona Halep  Romania 3 1–2 2014, 2017, 2018*
Mary Pierce  France 3 1–2 1994, 2000*, 2005
Evonne Goolagong  Australia 2 1–1 1971*, 1972
Virginia Ruzici  Romania 2 1–1 1978*, 1980
Ana Ivanovic  Serbia 2 1–1 2007, 2008*
Svetlana Kuznetsova  Russia 2 1–1 2006, 2009*
Francesca Schiavone  Italy 2 1–1 2010*, 2011
Ann Haydon-Jones  United Kingdom 2 0–2 1968, 1969
Martina Hingis   Switzerland 2 0–2 1997, 1999
Kim Clijsters  Belgium 2 0–2 2001, 2003
Dinara Safina  Russia 2 0–2 2008, 2009
Nancy Richey  United States 1 1–0 1968*
Billie Jean King  United States 1 1–0 1972*
Sue Barker  United Kingdom 1 1–0 1976*
Hana Mandlíková  Czechoslovakia 1 1–0 1981*
Iva Majoli  Croatia 1 1–0 1997*
Jennifer Capriati  United States 1 1–0 2001*
Anastasia Myskina  Russia 1 1–0 2004*
Li Na  China 1 1–0 2011*
Garbiñe Muguruza  Spain 1 1–0 2016*
Jeļena Ostapenko  Latvia 1 1–0 2017*
Helga Niessen Masthoff  West Germany 1 0–1 1970
Helen Gourlay  Australia 1 0–1 1971
Olga Morozova  Soviet Union 1 0–1 1974
Renáta Tomanová  Czechoslovakia 1 0–1 1976
Florența Mihai  Romania 1 0–1 1977
Wendy Turnbull  Australia 1 0–1 1979
Sylvia Hanika  West Germany 1 0–1 1981
Andrea Jaeger  United States 1 0–1 1982
Natalia Zvereva  Soviet Union 1 0–1 1988
Mary Joe Fernández  United States 1 0–1 1993
Conchita Martínez  Spain 1 0–1 2000
Venus Williams  United States 1 0–1 2002
Elena Dementieva  Russia 1 0–1 2004
Samantha Stosur  Australia 1 0–1 2010
Sara Errani  Italy 1 0–1 2012
Lucie Šafářová  Czech Republic 1 0–1 2015
Sloane Stephens  United States 1 0–1 2018

Most recent final[edit]

Year Nationality Winner Nationality Runner-up
2018  Romania Simona Halep  United States Sloane Stephens

Multiple-time opponents in the open era[edit]

Opponents Record Finals meetings
Most Wins Most Losses
United States Chris Evert Czechoslovakia/United States Martina Navratilova 3–1 1975 (Evert), 1984 (Navratilova), 1985 (Evert), 1986 (Evert)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Monica Seles Germany Steffi Graf 2–0 1990, 1992
Germany Steffi Graf Spain Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 2–1 1989 (Sánchez Vicario), 1995 (Graf), 1996 (Graf)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia/United States Monica Seles vs. Spain Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 1–1 1991 (Seles), 1998 (Vicario)

Most consecutive finals in the open era[edit]

Country Player Number Years Results
Won Lost
 United States Chris Evert 4 1983–86 3 1
 United States Martina Navratilova 4 1984–87 1 3
 Germany Steffi Graf 4 1987–90 2 2
 United States Chris Evert 3 1973–75 2 1
 Yugoslavia Monica Seles 3 1990–92 3 0
 Spain Arantxa Sánchez Vicario 3 1994–96 1 2
 Belgium Justine Henin 3 2005–07 3 0
 Russia Maria Sharapova 3 2012–14 2 1
 United Kingdom Ann Haydon-Jones 2 1968–69 0 2
 Australia Margaret Court 2 1969–70 2 0
 Australia Evonne Goolagong 2 1971–72 1 1
 Yugoslavia Mima Jaušovec 2 1977–78 1 1
 United States Chris Evert 2 1979–80 2 0
 Germany Steffi Graf 2 1992–93 1 1
 Germany Steffi Graf 2 1995–96 2 0
 Serbia Ana Ivanovic 2 2007–08 1 1
 Russia Dinara Safina 2 2008–09 0 2
 Italy Francesca Schiavone 2 2010–11 1 1
 United States Serena Williams 2 2015–16[4] 1 1
 Romania Simona Halep 2 2017–18 1 1

Bolded Years^ indicates Active or Current Streak

Notes[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c French Open. "French Open History". Fédération Française de Tennis. Archived from the original on January 2, 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-02.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "French Open Men's Singles". Grand Slam History. Retrieved 2009-11-04.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "French Open Women's Singles". Grand Slam History. Retrieved 2009-11-04.
  4. ^ "Serena Williams Confirms Pregnancy Announcement". Women's Tennis Association. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  5. ^ Reid, Tim (12 March 2008). "Martina Navratilova gets passport on rebound". The Times. London. Retrieved 10 December 2009.
  6. ^ Cherry, Gene (11 July 2009). "Monica Seles inducted into International Tennis Hall of Fame". Reuters. Retrieved 10 December 2009.

External links[edit]