List of Georgia Bulldogs head football coaches

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Coach Richt in a black shirt.
Mark Richt, 25th head coach of the Georgia Bulldogs

The Georgia Bulldogs college football team represents the University of Georgia in the East Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Bulldogs compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The school has had 25 head coaches since it began play during the 1892 season.[1] Since December 2000, Mark Richt has served as Georgia's head coach.[2]

The team has played more than 1,200 games over 118 seasons of Georgia football.[3] Five coaches have led the Bulldogs to postseason bowl games: Wally Butts, Vince Dooley, Ray Goff, Jim Donnan and Richt.[3] Four coaches also won conference championships: Herman Stegeman won one as a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association; Butts, Dooley and Richt won a combined twelve as a member of the SEC.[3] During their tenures, Butts and Dooley each won a national championship with the Bulldogs.[3][4]

Dooley is the leader in seasons coached and games won, with 201 victories during his 25 years with the Bulldogs.[1][3] Robert Winston has the highest winning percentage with .833, and Charles A. Barnard has the lowest winning percentage with .167.[3] Four of the team's coaches, Pop Warner, Butts, Dooley and Donnan have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.[5][6][7][8]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
No. Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, postseason records, championships and selected awards[A 5]
No. Name Term
[A 6]
GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL PT DC
[A 7]
CC NC Awards
1 Herty, CharlesCharles Herty 1892 2 1 1 0 .500 0
2 Brown, ErnestErnest Brown 1893 5 2 2 1 .500 0
3 Winston, RobertRobert Winston 1894 6 5 1 0 .833 0
4 Warner, PopPop Warnerdagger 1895–1896 11 7 4 0 .636 5 4 0 .556 0 0
5 McCarthy, CharlesCharles McCarthy 1897–1898 9 6 3 0 .667 5 2 0 .714 0 0
6 Saussy, GordonGordon Saussy 1899 6 2 3 1 .417 2 3 1 .417 0 0
7 Jones, E. E.E. E. Jones 1900 6 2 4 0 .333 1 3 0 .250 0 0
8 Reynolds, William A.William A. Reynolds 1901–1902 15 5 7 3 .433 4 7 3 .393 0 0
9 Dickinson, Marvin D.Marvin D. Dickinson 1903, 1905 13 4 9 0 .308 3 7 0 .300 0 0
10 Barnard, Charles A.Charles A. Barnard 1904 6 1 5 0 .167 0 4 0 .000 0 0
11 Whitney, George S.George S. Whitney 1906–1907 15 6 7 2 .467 3 6 2 .364 0 0
12 Bocock, BranchBranch Bocock 1908 8 5 2 1 .688 3 2 1 .583 0 0
13 Coulter, JamesJames Coulter
[A 8]
1909 8 2 4 2 .375 1 4 2 .286 0 0
14 Dobson, FrankFrank Dobson
[A 8]
1909 8 2 4 2 .375 1 4 2 .286 0 0
15 Cunningham, W. A.W. A. Cunningham 1910–1916, 1919 70 43 18 9 .679 37 17 9 .659 0 0 0 0 0
16 Stegeman, HermanHerman Stegeman 1920–1922 29 20 6 3 .741 15 3 3 .786 0 0 0 1 0
17 Woodruff, George CecilGeorge Cecil Woodruff 1923–1927 47 30 16 1 .649 21 10 0 .677 0 0 0 0 0
18 Mehre, HarryHarry Mehre 1928–1937 99 59 34 6 .626 29 25 5 .500 0 0 0 0 0
19 Hunt, JoelJoel Hunt 1938 10 5 4 1 .550 1 2 1 .375 0 0 0 0 0
20 Butts, WallyWally Buttsdagger 1939–1960 235 140 86 9 .615 66 60 5 .523 5 2 1 4 1 – 1942 AP SEC Coach of the Year (1946)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1942, 1946, 1959)[14]
21 Griffith, JohnnyJohnny Griffith 1961–1963 30 10 16 4 .400 6 12 1 .342 0 0 0 0 0
22 Dooley, VinceVince Dooleydagger 1964–1988 288 201 77 10 .715 104 42 4 .707 8 10 2 6 1 – 1980 Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award (1976)[15]
AFCA Coach of the Year (1980)[16]
FWAA Coach of the Year (1980)[14]
Sporting News College Football Coach of the Year (1980)[17]
Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award (1980)[18]
AP SEC Coach of the Year (1966, 1968, 1976, 1980)[14]
UPI SEC Coach of the Year (1966, 1968, 1976)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (1966, 1968, 1976, 1978, 1980)[14]
23 Goff, RayRay Goff 1989–1995 81 46 34 1 .574 24 28 1 .462 2 2 0 0 0 0
24 Donnan, JimJim Donnandagger 1996–2000 59 40 19 .678 25 15 .625 4 0 0 0 0 SEC Coach of the Year (1997)[14]
25 Richt, MarkMark Richt 2001–2015 188 140 48 .745 80 34 .702 9 5 5 2 0 AP SEC Coach of the Year (2002)[14]
SEC Coach of the Year (2002, 2005)[14]
26 Smart, KirbyKirby Smart 2016–present 4 3 1 .750 1 1 .500 0 0 0 0 0

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[9]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[10]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[11]
  5. ^ Statistics correct as of the end of the 2012 college football season.
  6. ^ Georgia did not field a team for the 1917 or 1918 seasons due to World War I.[3]
  7. ^ Divisional champions have advanced to the SEC Championship Game since the institution of divisional play beginning in the 1992 season. Since that time, Georgia has competed as a member of the SEC East.[12]
  8. ^ a b James Coulter and Frank Dobson served as co-head coaches for the 1909 season.[13]

References[edit]

General

Specific

  1. ^ a b "Georgia football history: Former head coaches". CBS Interactive. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Bulldogs raid Seminoles for coach". The Register-Guard. Eugene, Oregon. Associated Press. December 27, 2000. p. 2F. Retrieved May 10, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g 2011 Georgia Football Media Guide, pp. 158–163
  4. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2010). 2010 NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 68–77. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee search: Pop 'Pop' Warner". National Football Foundation. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee search: Wally Butts". National Football Foundation. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee search: Vince Dooley". National Football Foundation. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Hall of Fame inductee search: Jim Donnan". National Football Foundation. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  9. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  10. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  11. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  12. ^ Harwell, Hoyt (November 30, 1990). "SEC sets division lineups". The Tuscaloosa News. Tuscaloosa, Alabama. p. 1C. Retrieved February 3, 2012. 
  13. ^ 2011 Georgia Football Media Guide, p. 172
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i 2011 Georgia Football Media Guide, p. 196
  15. ^ "Past winners". Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Foundation. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Past national COTY winners". American Football Coaches Association. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  17. ^ "Magazine honors Dooley". Reading Eagle. Reading, Pennsylvania. Associated Press. January 13, 1981. p. 25. Retrieved February 20, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Walter Camp Football Foundation Awards". Walter Camp Football Foundation. Retrieved February 20, 2012.