List of Great North of Scotland Railway stations

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The communities that were served by the Great North of Scotland Railway

When, on 1 January 1923, the Great North of Scotland Railway (GNoSR) merged with other railways to become the London and North Eastern Railway, it owned 333 13 miles (536.4 km) of line.[1] Its main line, from Aberdeen in Scotland to Elgin via Keith, served branches to Fraserburgh and Peterhead, Alford, Oldmeldrum, Macduff, Banff, Boat of Garten and Lossiemouth. The GNoSR operated two routes to Elgin, one via Moray Firth, known as the Coast line, and another via Keith and Craigelliache; these connected with the Highland Railway at Keith and Elgin for services to Inverness. Another line, used by the reigning monarch when they travelled to Balmoral Castle, connected Aberdeen with Ballater.

Main line[edit]

The first section of Great North of Scotland's main line opened in 1854 from Kittybrewster to Huntly[2] and was extended two years later to Keith.[3] A through route to Inverness was formed in 1858 when was to become the Highland Railway reached the station and a junction was formed.[4] Services ran to a terminus in Aberdeen at Waterloo from 1856[5] before Aberdeen joint station opened in 1867.[6] The line was extended at the country end to Dufftown in 1862.[7] Meanwhile, the Morayshire Railway had built a line from Rothes to Craigellachie,[8] and subsequently linked this line to its Elgin station in 1862.[9] This was connected to the GNoSR when the Strathspey Railway opened in 1863.[10]

The GNoSR ran suburban services between Aberdeen and Dyce from 1887 and 1937.[11] The old GNoSR main line west of Keith and the Coast line closed on 6 May 1968;[12] on the same day services were withdrawn from minor intermediate stations. Currently the Aberdeen to Inverness Line uses the former Great North of Scotland Railway line as far Keith, with intermediate stations at Dyce, Inverurie, Insch, Huntly and Keith, before continuing over the former Highland Railway route to Inverness.

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Aberdeen 0 miles (0 km) 4 November 1867[6]
Schoolhill 38 mile (0.60 km) 1887[14] 5 April 1937[15]
Hutcheon Street 78 mile (1.4 km) 1 July 1887[16] 5 April 1937[15]
Waterloo
1 April 1856[5] 4 November 1867[6] Original station in the city, 1 34 miles (2.8 km) from Kittybrewster.[17]
Kittybrewster 1 38 miles (2.2 km) 20 September 1854[18] 6 May 1968[19] Branch from Waterloo joins main line. Opened as Aberdeen Kittybrewster, moved and name changed to Kittybrewster in 1856, moved again in 1867.[20]
Don Street 2 14 miles (3.6 km) 1 July 1887[21] 5 April 1937[15]
Woodside 2 58 miles (4.2 km) 1858[22] 5 April 1937[15]
Persley 3 14 miles (5.2 km) 1903[23] 5 April 1937[15] Renamed Persley Halt in 1926[23]
Bucksburn 4 18 miles (6.6 km) 20 September 1854[18] 5 March 1957[24] Spelt Buxburn until 1897[25]
Bankhead 4 58 miles (7.4 km) 1 July 1887[26] 5 April 1937[15]
Stoneywood 5 18 miles (8.2 km) 1 July 1887[27] 5 April 1937[15]
Dyce 6 14 miles (10.1 km) 20 September 1854[18] 6 May 1968[28] Junction for the Buchan section from 1861, moved 200 metres (660 ft) when the branch opened. Reopened 15 September 1984 on site of first station.[28]
Pitmedden 8 14 miles (13.3 km) 1874[29] 7 December 1964[30]
Kinaldie 10 12 miles (16.9 km) 1 December 1854[18][a] 7 December 1964[30]
Kintore 13 14 miles (21.3 km) 20 September 1854[18] 7 December 1964[30] Junction for the Alford branch
Inverurie 16 miles (26 km) 20 September 1854[18]
Junction for the Oldmeldrum branch. Opened as Inverury, renamed in 1866, moved 805 metres (2,641 ft) south in 1902.[31]
Inveramsay 20 12 miles (33.0 km) 5 September 1857[32] 1 October 1951[32] Junction for the Macduff branch
Pitcaple 20 14 miles (32.6 km) 20 September 1854[18] 6 May 1968[29]
Oyne 24 12 miles (39.4 km) 20 September 1854[18] 6 May 1968[33]
Buchanstone 25 34 miles (41.4 km) 1 December 1854[18] September 1866[24]
Insch 27 12 miles (44.3 km) 20 September 1854[18]
Wardhouse 31 miles (50 km) 1 December 1854[18] 5 June 1961[34]
Kennethmont 32 34 miles (52.7 km) 20 September 1854[18] 6 May 1968[35]
Gartly 35 34 miles (57.5 km) 20 September 1854[18] 6 May 1968[36] Sometimes described as Gartly for Lumsden and Strathdon.[36]
Huntly 40 34 miles (65.6 km) 20 September 1854[18]
Rothiemay 45 14 miles (72.8 km) 10 October 1856[3] 6 May 1968[37]
Cairnie Junction 48 14 miles (77.7 km) May 1897[38] 6 May 1968[38] Named Cairnie Platform before June 1919.[38]
Grange 48 34 miles (78.5 km) 10 October 1856[3] 6 May 1968[38] Interchange for Portsoy and Banff until the Coast line opened in 1886 with through services from Aberdeen.[39]
Keith Junction 53 14 miles (85.7 km) 10 October 1856[3]
Junction with the Highland Railway to Inverness from 18 August 1858.[4]
Keith Town 54 miles (87 km) 21 February 1862[40] 6 May 1968[41] Earlsmill until 1897[40]
Auchindachy 56 34 miles (91.3 km) 21 February 1862[40] 6 May 1968[41] Botriphnie until 1862[40]
Drummuir 59 12 miles (95.8 km) 21 February 1862[40] 6 May 1968[41]
Dufftown 64 miles (103 km) 21 February 1862[40] 6 May 1968[41]
Craigellachie 68 miles (109 km) 1 July 1863[42] 6 May 1968[41] Junction for the Strathspey branch. Opened as Strathspey Junction, renamed in 1864.[43]
Dandaleith 68 34 miles (110.6 km) 23 December 1858[44] 6 May 1968[41] Named Craigellachie until 1864.[43]
Rothes 71 miles (114 km) 23 August 1858[44] 6 May 1968[41] Served by a link to Orton until 31 July 1866[45]
Birchfield 74 miles (119 km) c. 1871[46] 7 May 1956[46]
Coleburn 75 12 miles (121.5 km) 5 June 1863[47] After July 1926[47] Use restricted and renamed Coleburn April 1867[47]
Longmorn 77 34 miles (125.1 km) 1 January 1862[48] 6 May 1968[48]
Elgin 80 34 miles (130.0 km) 10 August 1852[49]
Coast line and Lossiemouth branch, and a through line to the Highland Railway

Buchan section[edit]

The Formartine and Buchan Railway built the 29 miles (47 km) from Dyce to Old Deer (renamed Mintlaw in 1867) via Maud, which opened on 18 July 1861, Maud becoming a junction when the 16-mile (26 km) line to Fraserburgh opened on 24 April 1865.[50] The line was worked by the GNoSR from opening, who absorbed the original railway company on 1 August 1866.[51] A branch from Ellon to Cruden Bay and Boddam opened in 1897.[52] The line was closed to passengers on 4 October 1965 and completely 8 October 1979.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Dyce 0 miles (0 km)
6 14 miles (10.1 km) from Aberdeen on the main line
Parkhill 1 14 miles (2.0 km) 18 July 1861[53] 3 April 1950[54]
Elrick SB 3 34 miles (6.0 km)
Newmachar 5 14 miles (8.4 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[55] Originally New Machar[53]
Udny 8 14 miles (13.3 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[56]
Logierieve 10 miles (16 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[57] Briefly Newburgh Road on opening.[53]
Esslemont 11 12 miles (18.5 km) 18 July 1861[53] 15 September 1951[58]
Ellon 13 14 miles (21.3 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[59] Junction with Cruden section. Known as Ellon for Cruden until 1897.[59]
Arnage 16 34 miles (27.0 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[60]
Auchnagatt 20 34 miles (33.4 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[61]
Maud 25 miles (40 km) 18 July 1861[53] 4 October 1965[62] Junction with Peterhead branch. Opened as Brucklay,[53] renamed New Maud Junction on 24 April 1865, Maud Junction in April 1866,[55] and Maud 21 September 1925.[62]
Strichen 30 34 miles (49.5 km) 24 April 1865[63] 4 October 1965[59]
Mormond 33 14 miles (53.5 km) 24 April 1865[63][b] 4 October 1965[64]
Lonmay 35 34 miles (57.5 km) 24 April 1865[63] 4 October 1965[48]
Rathen 38 14 miles (61.6 km) 24 April 1865[63] 4 October 1965[65]
Philorth 39 12 miles (63.6 km) 24 April 1865[63] 4 October 1965[66] Private station, not in public timetable until 1926.[63]
Fraserburgh 41 miles (66 km) 24 April 1865[63] 4 October 1965[67]

Cruden section[edit]

The GNoSR opened a branch from Ellon to Boddam on 2 August 1897 to serve a hotel and golf complex it was building at Cruden Bay.[52] The line closed to passengers on 31 October 1932 and completely on 7 November 1945.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Ellon 0 miles (0 km)
13 14 miles (21.3 km) from Dyce on the Buchan section
Auchmacoy 3 12 miles (5.6 km) 2 August 1897[61] 31 October 1932[61]
Pitlurg 5 12 miles (8.9 km) 2 August 1897[29] 31 October 1932[29]
Hatton 8 14 miles (13.3 km) 2 August 1897[68] 31 October 1932[68]
Cruden Bay 10 14 miles (16.5 km) 2 August 1897[69] 31 October 1932[69]
Bullers O'Buchan 12 miles (19 km) 1900[70] 31 October 1932[70]
Longhaven 13 12 miles (21.7 km) 2 August 1897[48] 31 October 1932[48]
Boddam 15 12 miles (24.9 km) 2 August 1897[71] 31 October 1932[71]

Peterhead branch[edit]

The line from Dyce to Old Deer (renamed Mintlaw in 1867) was opened on 18 July 1861 by the Formartine and Buchan Railway, and extended the 9 miles (14 km) to Peterhead the following year.[50] The railway was worked by the GNoSR from opening, who absorbed the Formartine and Buchan on 1 August 1866.[51] The branch closed to passengers on 3 May 1965 and completely in 1970.[13]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Maud 0 miles (0 km)
25 miles (40 km) from Dyce on the Buchan section
Mintlaw 4 miles (6.4 km) 18 July 1861[53] 3 May 1965[72] Opened as Old Deer
Longside 7 14 miles (11.7 km) 3 July 1862[53] 3 May 1965[48]
Newseat 9 12 miles (15.3 km) 3 July 1862[53] 3 May 1965[73] Variously New Seat and Newseat Halt[73]
Inverugie 11 miles (18 km) 3 July 1862[53] 3 May 1965[32]
Peterhead 13 miles (21 km) 3 July 1862[53] 3 May 1965[66]

St Combs Light Railway[edit]

The GNoSR opened the St Combs Light Railway from Fraserburgh to St Combs on 1 July 1903,[74] and it closed on 3 May 1965.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Fraserburgh 0 miles (0 km)
Terminus of the Buchan section
Kirkton Bridge 1 mile (1.6 km) c. July 1904[19] 3 May 1965[19] Opened as Kirton Bridge Halt, renamed June 1908[19]
Philorth Bridge 2 14 miles (3.6 km) 1 July 1903[74] 3 May 1965[66]
Cairnbulg 3 58 miles (5.8 km) 1 July 1903[74] 3 May 1965[38] Known as Inverallochy until 1 September 1903.[38]
St Combs 5 18 miles (8.2 km) 1 July 1903[74] 3 May 1965[75]

Alford branch[edit]

The Alford Valley Railway from Kintore to Alford opened on 21 March 1859,[76] worked by the GNoSR, with whom it merged on 1 August 1866.[51] The line closed to passengers on 2 January 1950 and to goods in 1966.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Kintore 0 miles (0 km)
On main line, 13 14 miles (21.3 km) from Aberdeen
Paradise Sidings 3 34 miles (6.0 km) Private
Kemnay 4 12 miles (7.2 km) 21 March 1859[76] 2 January 1950[35]
Monymusk 7 12 miles (12.1 km) 21 March 1859[76] 2 January 1950[77]
Tillyfourie 10 34 miles (17.3 km) 1860[76] 2 January 1950[78]
Whitehouse 13 miles (21 km) 21 March 1859[76] 2 January 1950[79]
Alford 16 miles (26 km) 21 March 1859[76] 2 January 1950[80]

Oldmeldrum branch[edit]

The Inverury and Old Meldrum Junction Railway from Inverurie to Old Meldrum opened on 26 June 1856,[81] worked by the GNoSR, with whom it merged on 1 August 1866.[51] The line closed to passengers on 2 November 1931 and to goods on 3 January 1966.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Inverurie 0 miles (0 km)
On main line, 16 miles (26 km) from Aberdeen
Lethenty 2 14 miles (3.6 km) 1 July 1856[82] 2 November 1931[82]
Fingask Platform 3 12 miles (5.6 km) 1866[83] 2 November 1931[83] In some timetable as Fingask.[83]
Old Meldrum 5 14 miles (8.4 km) 1 July 1856[84] 2 November 1931[84] Opened as Oldmeldrum, name changed about 1902.[84]

Macduff branch[edit]

Authorised in 1855 and sponsored by the Great North, the Banff, Macduff and Turriff Junction Railway opened a line from Inveramsay to Turriff in 1857, and another company, the Banff, Macduff and Turriff Extension built and opened an extension to Banff & Macduff nearly two years later. The railways were worked by the GNoSR from opening, and merged with it on 1 August 1866. The short extension to Macduff was opened by the GNoSR in 1872, the original terminal closed and demolished.[85] The branch closed to passengers on 1 October 1951, the section north of Turriff completely on 1 August 1961 and completely on 3 January 1966.[13]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Inveramsay 0 miles (0 km)
On main line, 20 12 miles (33.0 km) from Aberdeen
Wartle 3 34 miles (6.0 km) 5 September 1857[86][c] 1 October 1951[34]
Rothie-Norman 7 12 miles (12.1 km) 5 September 1857[86] 1 October 1951[37] Opened as Rothie, renamed Rothie-Norman 1 March 1870[37]
Fyvie 10 34 miles (17.3 km) 5 September 1857[86] 1 October 1951[87]
Auchterless 14 miles (23 km) 5 September 1857[86] 1 October 1951[61]
Turriff 18 miles (29 km) 5 September 1857[86] 1 October 1951[88]
Plaidy 22 12 miles (36.2 km) 4 June 1860[86] 22 May 1944[29]
King Edward 24 34 miles (39.8 km) 4 June 1860[86] 1 October 1951[89]
Banff & Macduff 4 June 1860[86] 1 July 1872[90]
Banff Bridge 29 12 miles (47.5 km) 1 July 1872[90] 1 October 1951[26]
Macduff 29 34 miles (47.9 km) 1 July 1872[90] 1 October 1951[91]

Coast line[edit]

The railway from Grange to Portsoy via Tillynaught was opened by the Banff, Portsoy and Strathisla Railway on 30 July 1859, with full services from 2 August following a derailment on the opening day. The GNoSR operated services from 1863; these ran from Grange to Banff with a connection at Tillynaught.[92] This became an alternate route from Aberdeen to Elgin when the coast line had fully opened in 1886, a new curve allowing direct access from Aberdeen. Cairnie Platform (later Cairnie Junction) was built to allow trains to divide, with portions for Elgin via Craigellachie and the Coast Line.[93] Direct access to Grange from the line was withdrawn after the curve closed on 7 March 1960 and the line closed completely on 6 May 1968.[13]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Cairnie Junction 0 miles (0 km)
On main line, 48 14 miles (77.7 km) from Aberdeen
Knock[d] 3 14 miles (5.2 km) 30 July 1859[94] 6 May 1968[94]
Glenbarry 4 12 miles (7.2 km) 30 July 1859[95] 6 May 1968[96] Opened as Barry, closed in 1863. Reopened as Glenbarry in 1872.[97]
Cornhill 7 34 miles (12.5 km) 30 July 1859[98] 6 May 1968[98]
Tillynaught 10 miles (16 km) 30 July 1859[78] 6 May 1968[78]
Portsoy 12 34 miles (20.5 km) 30 July 1859[99] 6 May 1963[99] Station moved in 1884.[100]
Glassaugh 14 34 miles (23.7 km) 1 April 1884[100] 21 September 1953[101]
Tochieneal 17 miles (27 km) 1 April 1884[100] 1 October 1951[102]
Cullen 18 14 miles (29.4 km) 1 May 1886[100] 6 May 1968[103]
Portknockie 20 14 miles (32.6 km) 1 May 1886[100] 6 May 1968[104]
Findochty 21 12 miles (34.6 km) 1 May 1886[100] 6 May 1968[105]
Portessie 23 miles (37 km) 1 August 1884[106] 6 May 1968[104] Also used by Highland Railway services from Keith before 1915.[106][104]
Buckie 24 14 miles (39.0 km) 1 May 1886[100] 6 May 1968[24]
Buckpool 25 14 miles (40.6 km) 1 May 1886[100] 7 March 1960[24] Known as Nether Buckie before 1 January 1887.[24]
Portgordon 26 34 miles (43.0 km) 1 May 1886[100] 6 May 1968[104] Known as Port Gordon before 1938.[104]
Spey Bay 29 miles (47 km) 1 May 1886[100] 6 May 1968[107] Known as Fochabers and Spey Bay before 1 January 1918.[107]
Garmouth 30 14 miles (48.7 km) 12 August 1884[100] 6 May 1968[36]
Urquhart 33 12 miles (53.9 km) 12 August 1884[100] 6 May 1968[108]
Calcots 36 miles (58 km) 12 August 1884[100] 6 May 1968[38]
Lossie Junction SB 36 miles (58 km) 12 August 1884[100] Junction with the Lossiemouth branch
Elgin 39 miles (63 km) 10 August 1852[49]
Main line via Craigellachie, Lossiemouth branch and a connection with the Highland Railway

Banff branch[edit]

This was served from Grange until the Coast line opened in 1886, when services connected at Tillynaught.[92] The branch closed to passengers on 6 July 1964 and completely on 6 May 1968.[13]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Tillynaught 0 miles (0 km)
On Coast Line 10 miles (16 km) from Cairnie Junction
Ordens 1 14 miles (2.0 km) 30 July 1859[109] 6 July 1964[109] Opened as Ordens. Service restricted after October 1863, renamed Ordens Platform by 1911 and service restored and renamed Ordens Halt on 14 July 1924[109]
Ladysbridge 3 12 miles (5.6 km) 30 July 1859[94] 6 July 1964[94] Opened as Lady's Bridge, renamed June 1886[94]
Bridgefoot 4 34 miles (7.6 km) 1914[110] 6 July 1964[110]
Golf Club House 5 14 miles (8.4 km) 1914[111] 6 July 1964[111] Also known as Banff Golf Club House[111]
Banff 6 miles (9.7 km) 30 July 1859[26] 6 July 1964[26] Known as Banff Harbour until June 1926.[26]

Speyside section[edit]

The Strathspey Railway opened on 1 July 1863 between Dufftown and Abernethy (later called Nethy Bridge), via Strathspey Junction (later called Craigellachie) where it joined an extension of the Morayshire Railway. The line from Dufftown north through Craigellachie became the main line, and the railway south to Nethy Bridge, (later extended to Boat of Garten) the branch line.[112] The Strathspey was absorbed by the Great North of Scotland Railway in 1866.[51] The line closed to passengers on 18 October 1965, the section south of Aberlour completely on 4 November 1968 and the remaining section completely 15 November 1971.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Craigellachie 0 miles (0 km)
On main line, 68 miles (109 km) from Aberdeen
Aberlour 2 14 miles (3.6 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[114]
Dailuaine Halt[e] 4 34 miles (7.6 km) 1934[115] 18 October 1965[115]
Carron 5 12 miles (8.9 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[116]
Imperial Cottages[e] 6 miles (9.7 km) 15 June 1959[32] 18 October 1965[32]
Knockando House 6 34 miles (10.9 km) 1 September 1869[94] 18 October 1965[94] Private platform, known as Knockando until 1905.[117]
Gilbey's Cottages[e] 7 34 miles (12.5 km) Summer 1959[118] 18 October 1965[119]
Knockando 8 miles (13 km) 1899[117] 18 October 1965[94] Known as Dalbeallie until 1905.[117]
Blacksboat 10 14 miles (16.5 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[120]
Ballindalloch 12 miles (19 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[121]
Advie 15 14 miles (24.5 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[122] Moved 1863.[43]
Dalvey Farm[e] 17 34 miles (28.6 km) 15 June 1959[123] 18 October 1965[123]
Dalvey 1 July 1863[113] 1 September 1868[123] Originally spelt Dalvie.[43]
Cromdale 21 miles (34 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[124]
Grantown-on-Spey 24 miles (39 km) 1 July 1863[113] 18 October 1965[125] Opened as Grantown, renamed Grantown-on-Spey 1 June 1912 and Grantown-on-Spey East 5 June 1950[125]
Ballifurth Farm[e] 26 12 miles (42.6 km) 15 June 1959[121] 18 October 1965[121]
Nethy Bridge 28 12 miles (45.9 km) 1 July 1863[42] 18 October 1965[126] Opened as Abernethy, renamed in 1867.[42]
Broomhill Junction 30 14 miles (48.7 km)
Boat of Garten 33 14 miles (53.5 km) 3 August 1863[71] 18 October 1965[71] The Strathspey Railway reached here on 1 August 1866.[42] Joint station with Highland Railway.

Lossiemouth branch[edit]

The Lossiemouth branch was built by the Morayshire Railway from its Elgin station on 10 August 1852.[49] Worked by the GNoSR since 1863, the Morayshire Railway was absorbed by the GNoSR in August 1881.[51] The line was closed to passengers on 6 April 1964 and completely two years later.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Lossie Junction
Signal Box
0 miles (0 km)
On Coast Line 1 mile (1.6 km) from Elgin
Linksfield 12 mile (0.80 km) 10 August 1852[49] 1859[49] Request stop, did not appear in timetables after 1859.[49]
Greens of Draine 2 12 miles (4.0 km) 10 August 1852[49] 1859[49] Request stop, did not appear in timetables after 1859.[49]
Lossiemouth 4 12 miles (7.2 km) 10 August 1852[49] 6 April 1964[12]

Deeside section[edit]

The Deeside Railway opened from Ferryhill to Banchory on 8 September 1853 and services were extended to Guild Street when this opened the following year.[127] A new company, the Aboyne Extension opened the line to Aboyne in 1859, and the Aboyne & Braemar Railway extended the line to Ballater in 1866.[128] The Aberdeen joint station became the terminus when this opened in 1867.[6] The Deeside Railway was leased by the GNoSR from 1866 who absorbed the Deeside Railway on 1 August 1875 and the Aboyne & Braemar Railway on 31 January 1876.[129] The line closed to passengers on 28 February 1966, the section west of Culter completely on 18 July 1966 and the remaining section completely 2 January 1967.[12]

Station Distance[13] Opened Closed Notes
Aberdeen (Joint) 0 miles (0 km) 4 November 1867[6]
Ferryhill Junction
signal box
58 mile (1.0 km)
Holburn Street 1 38 miles (2.2 km) 2 July 1894[130] 5 April 1937[15]
Ruthrieston 1 34 miles (2.8 km) January 1856[131] 5 April 1937[15] Closed 1876–1885[131]
Pitfodels 3 miles (4.8 km) 2 July 1894[29] 5 April 1937[15]
Cults 3 58 miles (5.8 km) 8 September 1853[132] 28 February 1966[103] Station moved 1855.[103]
West Cults 4 18 miles (6.6 km) 1 August 1894[133] 5 April 1937[15]
Bieldside 4 34 miles (7.6 km) 1 June 1897[46] 5 April 1937[15]
Murtle 5 38 miles (8.7 km) 8 September 1853[132] 5 April 1937[15]
Milltimber 6 14 miles (10.1 km) 1854[132] 5 April 1937[15]
Culter 7 38 miles (11.9 km) 8 September 1853[132] 28 February 1966[103]
Drum 9 34 miles (15.7 km) January 1854[134] 10 September 1951[134]
Park 10 34 miles (17.3 km) 8 September 1853[132] 28 February 1966[54]
Mills of Drum 13 miles (21 km) 8 September 1853[132] 1 January 1863[135]
Crathes 14 14 miles (22.9 km) 8 September 1853[132] 28 February 1966[136] Private platform, replaced Mills of Drum as public station from 1863[132]
Banchory 16 34 miles (27.0 km) 8 September 1853[132] 28 February 1966[26] Station moved in 1859 and 1902[26]
Dee Street[e] 17 12 miles (28.2 km) 6 February 1961[137] 28 February 1966[137]
Glassel 21 38 miles (34.4 km) 2 December 1859[138] 28 February 1966[101]
Torphins 23 34 miles (38.2 km) 2 December 1859[138] 28 February 1966[102]
Lumphanan 26 78 miles (43.3 km) 2 December 1859[138] 28 February 1966[139]
Dess 29 12 miles (47.5 km) 2 December 1859[138] 28 February 1966[140]
Aboyne 32 14 miles (51.9 km) 2 December 1859[138] 28 February 1966[122]
Dinnet 36 34 miles (59.1 km) 17 October 1866[138] 28 February 1966[140]
Cambus O'May 39 38 miles (63.4 km) 1876[138] 28 February 1966[141]
Ballater 43 14 miles (69.6 km) 17 October 1866[138] 28 February 1966[121]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Butt (1995, p. 133) lists opening date as November 1854.
  2. ^ Butt (1995, p. 163) has opening date in 1870.
  3. ^ Butt (1995, p. 241) lists the opening date as 5 August 1857
  4. ^ Millegan railway station is listed in Vallance (1991, Appendix 4), 1 14 miles (2.0 km) from Cairne Junction, but not listed on Butt (1995, p. 160) or Jowett (1989, map 15)
  5. ^ a b c d e f Opened after the GNoSR had become part of the LNER.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 143.
  2. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 24.
  3. ^ a b c d Vallance 1991, p. 30.
  4. ^ a b Vallance 1991, p. 31.
  5. ^ a b Vallance 1991, p. 28.
  6. ^ a b c d e Vallance 1991, p. 71.
  7. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 53–54.
  8. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 39–40.
  9. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 43.
  10. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 45.
  11. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 100, 181.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Vallance 1991, Appendix 3.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Vallance 1991, Appendix 4.
  14. ^ Butt 1995, p. 206.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Vallance 1991, p. 181.
  16. ^ Butt 1995, p. 125.
  17. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 27.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Vallance 1991, pp. 23–25.
  19. ^ a b c d Butt 1995, p. 136.
  20. ^ Butt 1995, pp. 12, 136.
  21. ^ Butt 1995, p. 81.
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  24. ^ a b c d e Butt 1995, p. 47.
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  32. ^ a b c d e Butt 1995, p. 127.
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  51. ^ a b c d e f Vallance 1991, Appendix 5.
  52. ^ a b Vallance 1991, pp. 95–97.
  53. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Vallance 1991, p. 63.
  54. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 181.
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  56. ^ Butt 1995, p. 237.
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  60. ^ Butt 1995, p. 19.
  61. ^ a b c d Butt 1995, p. 21.
  62. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 156.
  63. ^ a b c d e f g Vallance 1991, p. 64.
  64. ^ Butt 1995, p. 163.
  65. ^ Butt 1995, p. 194.
  66. ^ a b c Butt 1995, p. 185.
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  74. ^ a b c d Vallance 1991, p. 119.
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  77. ^ Butt 1995, p. 162.
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  79. ^ Butt 1995, p. 248.
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  81. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 60.
  82. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 142.
  83. ^ a b c Butt 1995, p. 96.
  84. ^ a b c Butt 1995, p. 177.
  85. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 57–59.
  86. ^ a b c d e f g h Vallance 1991, p. 58.
  87. ^ Butt 1995, p. 100.
  88. ^ Butt 1995, p. 236.
  89. ^ Butt 1995, p. 113.
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  91. ^ Butt 1995, p. 152.
  92. ^ a b Vallance 1991, pp. 49–51.
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  101. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 103.
  102. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 231.
  103. ^ a b c d Butt 1995, p. 74.
  104. ^ a b c d e Butt 1995, p. 189.
  105. ^ Butt 1995, p. 97.
  106. ^ a b Vallance 1991, p. 95.
  107. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 217.
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  110. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 43.
  111. ^ a b c Butt 1995, p. 106.
  112. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 55–57.
  113. ^ a b c d e f g h Vallance 1991, pp. 55–56.
  114. ^ Butt 1995, p. 12.
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  116. ^ Butt 1995, p. 54.
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  118. ^ Vallance 1991, p. 102.
  119. ^ Butt 1995, p. 102.
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  122. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 13.
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  124. ^ Butt 1995, p. 72.
  125. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 108.
  126. ^ Butt 1995, p. 168.
  127. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 75–77.
  128. ^ Vallance 1991, pp. 77–78.
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  133. ^ Butt 1995, p. 245.
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  135. ^ Butt 1995, p. 160.
  136. ^ Butt 1995, p. 71.
  137. ^ a b Butt 1995, p. 77.
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  141. ^ Butt 1995, p. 52.

Books[edit]

  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-85260-508-1. 
  • Jowett, Alan (March 1989). Jowett's Railway Atlas of Great Britain and Ireland: From Pre-Grouping to the Present Day (1st ed.). Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0086-1. 
  • Vallance, H. A. (27 June 1991). Great North of Scotland railway. The History of the Railways of the Scottish Highlands vol 3. David St John Thomas. ISBN 978-0-946537-60-0. 

External links[edit]