List of historic Greek countries and regions

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This is a list of Greek countries and regions throughout history. It includes empires, countries, states, regions and territories that have or had in the past one of the following characteristics:

Antiquity (to 330 AD)[edit]

Bronze Age[edit]

During the Bronze Age a number of entities were formed in Mycenean Greece (1600-1100 BC), each of them was rule by a Wanax, the most important were:

City states[edit]

During the history of Ancient Greece a total of 1,500 to 2,000[1] city-states were established. The most important were the following.

Kingdoms, Empires and Leagues[edit]

Middle Ages (330–1453)[edit]

The Greek Middle Ages are coterminous with the duration of the Byzantine Empire (330–1453).

After 395 the Roman Empire splits in two. In the East, Greeks are the predominant national group and their language is the lingua franca of the region. Christianity is the official religion of this new Empire, spread to the region by the Greek language, the language in which the first gospels were written. The language of the aristocracy however remains Latin, until gradually replaced by Greek by the 6th century. The East Roman Empire remained one of the world's most important states until the 12th century. Amongst its achievements is the spread of Christianity to Eastern Europe and the Slavs, halting the Persian, Slavic and Arab expansions towards Europe and preserving a vast amount of the cultural heritage of Antiquity. In 1204, after a civil struggle, the Fourth Crusade conquered the capital, Constantinople, and led the Empire to partitions and crises from which it never recovered.

Byzantine Greek successor states[edit]

Crusader states[edit]

Other states[edit]

Modern era (after 1453)[edit]

Independent states[edit]

  • Septinsular Republic (1800–1815), independent but de facto occupied by Russia (1800-1807), France (1807-1814) and Great Britain (1809-1815)
  • Greece/Greece Greece (1822–present)
  • Cyprus Cyprus (1960–present)

Autonomous, secessionist or unrecognised entities[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rural Greece Under the Democracy, Victor Davis Hanson, Times Literary Supplement, 2004
  2. ^ The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, by B. C. McGing, page 11
  3. ^ Children of Achilles: The Greeks in Asia Minor Since the Days of Troy, by John Freely, page 69-70
  4. ^ Strabo of Amasia: A Greek Man of Letters in Augustan Rome, by Daniela Dueck, page 3
  5. ^ Children of Achilles: The Greeks in Asia Minor Since the Days of Troy, by John Freely, page 69-70
  6. ^ The Foreign Policy of Mithridates VI Eupator, King of Pontus, by B. C. McGing, page 11
  7. ^ Anna Krateva, Communities and identities in Bulgaria, 1998, p.164
  8. ^ Regional Museum of History, Plovdiv
  9. ^ http://www.da.mod.uk/colleges/csrc/document-listings/balkan/G97," In May 1914, the Great Powers signed the Protocol of Corfu, which recognised the area as Greek."
  10. ^ Republic of Pontus (Greece, 1917-1922), Flags of the World
  11. ^ Gross, Andreas. "Gökçeada (Imbros) and Bozcaada (Tenedos): preserving the bicultural character of the two Turkish islands as a model for co-operation between Turkey and Greece in the interest of the people concerned". Council of Europe. Retrieved 4 September 2012.