List of Hebrew Bible events

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The Hebrew Bible is the canonical collection of Hebrew scriptures and is the textual source for the Christian Old Testament. In addition to religious instruction, the collection chronicles a series of events that explain the origins and travels of the Hebrew peoples in the ancient Near East. The historicity of the collection of scriptures is a source of on-going debate.[1]

The events of the Hebrew Bible can be subdivided into 3 main sections: the Torah (instruction), the Nevi'im (prophets), and the Ketuvim (writings).

The events listed in the Torah start with the creation of the universe and conclude with transfer of authority from Moses to Joshua and the death of Moses.

The Nevi'im is authored by leading Hebrew prophets from the time Joshua leads the Hebrew people into Canaan until some time after the return of Hebrew remnant from Babylonian exile. In addition to recorded significant contemporary military and political events, many future events are predicted.

The Ketuvim recounts events over the same timeline as the Nevi'im, but from the point of view of secular leaders and lesser prophets.

Torah[edit]

Genesis[edit]

Exodus[edit]

Leviticus[edit]

Numbers[edit]

Deuteronomy[edit]

Nevi'im[edit]

Joshua[edit]

Judges[edit]

  • Israel Disobeys God, 2:1-23

Othniel

Ehud

Shamgar

Judges 3:31

Deborah

Gideon

  • The Lord Appears to Gideon, 6:1-40
  • The Sign of the Fleece and Gideon's Three Hundred, 7:1-25
  • Midian Subdued, 8:1-35

Abimelech

  • Abmilech, son of Gideon (Jerubbaal) made king at Shechem after destroying his own family, 9:1-6
  • Jotham, the lone survivor and brother, tells The Parable of the Trees. He speaks against Abimelech then flees, 9:7-21
  • Shechem betrays Abimelech. He attacks and destroys the city.
  • Abimelech captures the town of Thebez, but he is mortally wounded by a woman. 9:22-57

Tola

  • Tola the son of Puah, the son of Dodo, a man of Issachar dwelt in Shamir in mount Ephraim. He judged Israel for twenty-three years, 10:1,2

Jair

Jephthah

  • Jephthah and His Vow, 11: 1-40

Ibzah

12:8-10

Elon

12:11, 12

Abdon

12:13-15

Samson

  • The Birth of Samson, 13:1-25
  • Samson's Phlistine Wife, 14:1-20
  • The Philistine's Defeated, 15: 1-20
  • Samson and Delilah, 16:1-31
  • The Death of Samson, 17:1-13

Other Stories

1 & 2 Samuel[edit]

1 & 2 Kings[edit]

Isaiah[edit]

Jeremiah[edit]

  • Call of Jeremiah, 1:1-10
  • Jeremiah sees an almond rod then a boiling pot, 1:11-19
  • Jeremiah's message at the temple gate, 7:1-34
  • Jeremiah buys a linen waistband and puts it in the crevice of a rock near the Euphrates. 13:1-11
  • The LORD tells Jeremiah that he can't get married or have children, 16:1-21
  • Jeremiah stands at the city gate proclaiming the Sabbath's importance 17:19-27
  • Jeremiah visits the potter, 18:1-23
  • Jeremiah takes a potter's clay jar and some of the elders to the valley of Ben-hinnon, 19:1-15
  • Pashur, the chief officer in the house of the LORD, beats Jeremiah and puts him in stocks. Jeremiah's complains to God. 20:1-18
  • Zedekiah, Pashur, and Zephaniah ask Jeremiah if there is a positive message from the LORD. Jeremiah prophesies doom for them. He predicts the coming of the Branch. 21:1-23:40
  • Jeremiah summarizes 23 years of prophetic ministry; lists the nations under judgment and predicts 70 years of captivity. 25:1-38
  • Jeremiah prophesies against the temple and the city. He is accused of a capital crime. His life is spared after discussion of precedence. Thanks to Ahikam the son of Shaphan. 26:1-24
  • Following the LORD's directive, Jeremiah puts himself in bonds and a yoke. He relates that the LORD has given Nebuchadnezzar the land until his time comes. Hananiah breaks Jeremiah's yoke and prophesies the opposite message. 27:1-22
  • The Exile

Ezekiel[edit]

Hosea[edit]

Hosea was a prophet who lived and prophesied just before the destruction of Israel in 722 BC. He preached to the northern kingdom. Throughout the book you will see that he refers to Israel and Ephraim. Ephraim was the largest tribe in Israel and sometimes the whole nation was referred to as Ephraim.

Joel[edit]

Amos[edit]

Obadiah[edit]

Jonah[edit]

Micah[edit]

Nahum[edit]

Habakkuk[edit]

Zephaniah[edit]

Haggai[edit]

Zechariah[edit]

Malachi[edit]

Ketuvim[edit]

Psalms[edit]

Proverbs[edit]

Job[edit]

Song of Songs[edit]

Ruth[edit]

Lamentations[edit]

Ecclesiastes[edit]

Esther[edit]

Daniel[edit]

Ezra/Nehemiah[edit]

Chronicles (I & II)[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Davies, Philip (April 2010). "Beyond Labels: What Comes Next?". The Bible and Interpretation. Retrieved 2016-05-31. It has been accepted for decades that the Bible is not in principle either historically reliable or unreliable, but both: it contains both memories of real events and also fictions.

External links[edit]