List of Hindu festivals

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There are a great number of Hindu religious festivals held throughout the world. The festivals typically celebrate events from Hindu mythology, often coinciding with seasonal changes. There are many festivals which are primarily celebrated by specific sects or in certain regions of the Indian subcontinent.

The festive season in India is the most widely celebrated and rejoiced by the people. Festivals not only have a historic significance to them, they are rooted in various cultural and linguistic norms associated with them. The festivities have their own spark, they bring together, or in other words, unite people of different religions and sects into a unified whole. With so many festivals always round the corner, there is a wave of liveliness and celebration in the society. Bringing people together is just one aspect of it, festivals hold with them the sacred cultural roots and traditions that is unique to every festival. The onset of the famous Diwali marks the beginning of lighting 'diyas', beautifying homes, offering gifts and visiting our near and dear ones. Similarly, the Holi festival is said to be the 'Festival of Colors", with its magnificent rain dance and the 'gulaal', it surely colors the lives of people.

Terminology[edit]

Utsava[edit]

'Utsava' is the Sanskrit word for Hindu festivals, meaning 'to cause to grow 'upward'.[citation needed] Uthsava or Utsava or Utsav is derived from the Sanskrit word, Utsava. The Sanskrit word Utsava comes from the word "ut" meaning "removal" and "sava" which means "worldly sorrows" or "grief".[1]

Observance periods (tithi)[edit]

In the Hindu calendar dates are usually prescribed according to the lunar calendar. In Vedic timekeeping, a tithi is a lunar day.

Sublists[edit]

List and descriptions of major Hindu festivals[edit]

See also[edit]

'Hindu festival related concepts

Others

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sri Venkateswara Swami Temple of Greater Chicago
  2. ^ [1], Pongalfestival.org.
  3. ^ Friedrichs, Kurt (1994). "Sarasvatī". In Schuhmacher, Stephan; Woerner, Gert. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy and Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Boston: Shambala. p. 306. ISBN 0-87773-980-3. The goddess of ... scholarship ... She is also the patron of the arts, especially of music.
  4. ^ Kent, Alexandra. Divinity and Diversity: A Hindu Revitalization Movement in Malaysia. University of Hawaii Press, 2005. (ISBN 8791114896)
  5. ^ Hume, Lynne. Portals.
  6. ^ "Mahashivaratri Festival : Festival of Shivratri, Mahashivratri Festival India - Mahashivaratri Festival 2019". Mahashivratri.org. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  7. ^ "Rama Navami - Hindupedia, the Hindu Encyclopedia". Hindupedia.com. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  8. ^ "Hanuman Jayanti - Hanuman Jayanti 2018 Date - Celebrations in India". Indiaonlinepages.com. 2018-03-31. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  9. ^ "Janmashtami / Krishna Janmashtami : A hindu religious festival". Calendarlabs.com. 2018-03-09. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  10. ^ "Indian Festivals". Webonautics.com. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  11. ^ "Sama Chakeva". Wikipedia. 2017-11-06.

External links[edit]