List of Houston Independent School District schools

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This is a list of schools operated by the Houston Independent School District.

In the district, grades kindergarten through 5 are considered to be elementary school, grades 6 through 8 are considered to be middle school, and grades 9 through 12 are considered to be high school. Some elementary schools go up to the sixth grade.

Every house in HISD is assigned to an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school. HISD has many alternative programs and transfer options available to students who want a specialized education and/or dislike their home schools.

Current schools[edit]

EE-12 schools[edit]

  • Thomas Horace Rogers School (Alternative school) is part Vanguard school (K-8), part school for the deaf (K-8), and part school for multiply impaired children (K-12).

EE-8 schools[edit]

Traditional:

Alternative:

PK-8 schools[edit]

  • Garden Oaks K-8 School (Houston) (Zoned for K-5, magnet for K-8)
  • Thomas J. Pilgrim Academy (Zoned school) (Houston)
    • The school was built in 1957, on the sesquicentennial of the birth of Thomas J. Pilgrim, and opened as Thomas J. Pilgrim Elementary School.[2] In 2006 it began adding middle school grades,[3] and in 2007 it changed its name to its current one and moved into its current location.[2] Principal Alma Salman arranged to have middle school grades added so the school could have more time to increase student performance so it meets their grade levels. As of 2011 85% of the students at Pilgrim are low income, and about 66% of students who are new to Pilgrim have limited proficiency of English, with Spanish and Arabic being the most common native languages. As of 2011 250 students are in grades 6-8. In 2011 Children at Risk ranked the Pilgrim middle school as the best comprehensive middle school program in Houston.[3]
  • The Rusk School (Houston) (magnet for K-8, will become 6-8 only)
  • Wharton Dual Language Academy (Houston, elementary zoned, K-8 magnet)
  • Wilson Montessori School (PK3 through 6 zoned, PK3-8 Montessori and fine arts magnet) (Houston)
  • Carter G. Woodson K-8 Center (Zoned school) (Houston)

K-8 schools[edit]

(Zoned)

  • Billy K. Reagan K-8 Educational Center (opening in the 2010s)[6]

(Alternative)

Secondary schools[edit]

6-12 schools[edit]

7-12 schools[edit]

High schools[edit]

38 in Houston, 1 in Bellaire

Zoned high schools[edit]

AAAAAA (Division 6A)

AAAAA (Division 5A)

AAAA (Division 4A)

AAA (Division 3A)

  • Scarborough High School is in northwest Houston and is the smallest public high school in HISD, with only around 750 students.
Other high schools[edit]

AAAAA (Division 5A)

No UIL ranking:

Middle schools[edit]

West Briar Middle School in Parkway Villages
Traditional middle schools[edit]
Other middle schools[edit]

Primary schools[edit]

Early Childhood Centers[edit]

Gabriela Mistral Early Childhood Center
  • Ashford Early Childhood Center (Houston)[52]
  • Bellfort Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • David "Davy" Crockett Early Childhood Center (Houston) (The campus was formerly Brock Elementary School - Elementary students were rezoned to Crockett ES)
  • Armandina Farias Early Childhood Center (Houston, opening August 2005)
  • Fonwood Early Childhood Center
    • Originally Fonwood Elementary School of the North Forest Independent School District,[8] it was built in 1964.[25] Prior to NFISD's closure, the district had been planning to close Fonwood Elementary.[53] HISD converted Fonwood into the area's early childhood center after the takeover effective July 1, 2013.[8] It was one of the older schools of NFISD. HISD released statements highlighting the poor condition of Fonwood Elementary when doing a post-takeover tour of the school. In a tour of the campus in July 2013, Terry Grier noted a playground in poor condition, water fountains too tall for children, exposed wires, violins without strings stored in the music room, and a restroom which had a bad odor. The teacher's lounge had a plush couch, upholstered chairs, flowers, and a flatscreen television.[54] HISD did not state that NFISD was planning to close Fonwood.[53] It became an early childhood center when NFISD merged into HISD on July 1, 2013.[8]
  • Sharon Goldstein Halpin Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • Ninfa Laurenzo Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • Gabriela Mistral Early Childhood Center (Houston, opened August 2005)

Interagency Alternative Schools[edit]

  • Beechnut Academy Southwest
  • Beechnut Academy Southeast

Online learning[edit]

HISD has an online high school offering regular, AP, and credit-recovery courses at its virtual school. For grades 3-12 offers online schooling through Texas Connections Academy @ Houston, which is operated under contract by Connections Academy, a Maryland-based company which works with public and other schools to provide online education.[55][56][57]

Defunct schools[edit]

Former secondary schools[edit]

  • New Aspirations Charter School [6]

Former 7-12 schools[edit]

Former high schools[edit]

Zoned

Alternative

  • DeVry Advantage Academy (Houston)
  • Foley's Academy (Houston)[60]
    • Foley's Academy (1987-2000) was an alternative high school where students advanced at their own pace. It featured one-on-one learning and catered to at-risk students to prevent them from dropping out. Former first lady Barbara Bush and Dr. Joan Raymond headed the opening ceremony by signing in the first three students: Twanna Lynn, Shannon Gladney and Robert Martinez.[citation needed]
  • New Aspirations Academy High School (Houston) (closed 2012)
  • Ninth Grade Academy (Houston)
  • Middle College For Technology Careers (Houston) (opened in 1994, closed in 2006)
  • Houston Drop Back In Academy (Houston) - Closed[15]

High school programs formerly affiliated

Former K-8 and 1-8 schools[edit]

Former middle schools[edit]

Former zoned schools

  • Lockett Junior High School (303 West Dallas, opened in former Booker T. Washington High School building in 1959, closed June 1968[15])
  • Longfellow Junior High School (2202 St. Emanuel, Houston) (Built in 1913, converted into Dunbar Elementary in 1961[15])
  • Miller Junior High School (Houston) (Campus now houses Young Women's College Preparatory Academy)
  • James D. Ryan Middle School (Houston) - Closed in 2013,[63] building now used for The Medical and Health Professions Academy at Ryan Middle School[51]
  • Terrell Middle School (Houston) (Opened 1966, later became an alternative school, closed in 2001[15]) - As of 2014 it serves as an immigration detention center for children[64]

Other schools

Former primary schools[edit]

Former early childhood centers[edit]

Langston Family Life Center, formerly Langston Early Childhood Center

2 in Houston

  • Concord Early Childhood Center (Houston)
    • Concord, located on the site of Kashmere Gardens Elementary School, closed due to low enrollment. The students will be a part of the Kashmere Gardens population.[65]
  • Langston Early Childhood Center (2815 Campbell, Opened 1994, closed May 2004,[15] Students transferred to Crawford ES)
  • Las Américas Early Childhood Development Center (5909 Glenmont, Houston) (5909 Glenmont, 77081) (Closed in 2007[66])
  • Wheatley Child Development (4900 Market, Houston, Opened 1993, closed 2007[15])

Former alternative centers[edit]

  • The Harris County Youth Village in far southern Pasadena, west of Seabrook, opened in 1972. The center was no longer affiliated with HISD in 1997.[15]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Garden Oaks K-8 Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 9, 2016.
  2. ^ a b "History" (Archive). Thomas J. Pilgrim Academy. Retrieved on November 29, 2015.
  3. ^ a b Mellon, Ericka. "Despite the odds, Pilgrim Academy hits the mark" (Archive). Houston Chronicle. Monday April 18, 2011. Retrieved on November 29, 2015.
  4. ^ "Wharton K-8 Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 9, 2016.
  5. ^ "Wilson K-8 Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 9, 2016.
  6. ^ "New Schools to Be Named After Former Superintendent and U.S. Judge." Houston Independent School District. January 14, 2009.
  7. ^ "Board Approves High School for Business and Economic Success." Houston Independent School District. June 15, 2009. Retrieved on August 23, 2009.
  8. ^ a b c d e "Principals selected, changes proposed for North Forest schools." (Archive) Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on June 14, 2013.
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program, Schools Recognized 1982-1983 Through 1999-2002 (PDF) Archived March 26, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.
  11. ^ a b c Microsoft Word - list-2003.doc
  12. ^ Eastwood Academy Newsletter
  13. ^ a b Houston Academy for International Studies
  14. ^ "South Early College High School at TSU Now Accepting Applications." Houston Independent School District. July 20, 2009. Retrieved on August 1, 2009.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "School Histories: the Stories Behind the Names Archived July 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.." (Archive) Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on September 24, 2008.
  16. ^ "Attucks Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  17. ^ a b "Black Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  18. ^ "History." Burbank Middle School. Retrieved on January 6, 2017.
  19. ^ "Black Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  20. ^ "Cullen Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  21. ^ "Deady Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  22. ^ a b c San Miguel, Guadalupe. Brown, Not White: School Integration and the Chicano Movement in Houston (Volume 3 of University of Houston Series in Mexican American Studies, Sponsored by the Center for Mexican American Studies). Texas A&M University Press, October 26, 2005. ISBN 1585444936, 9781585444939. CITED: p. 219.
  23. ^ "Fleming Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  24. ^ "Fondren Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  25. ^ a b "Chapter 5 FACILITIES USE AND MANAGEMENT NORTH FOREST INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT." (Archive) Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Retrieved on November 21, 2011.
  26. ^ Martin, Betty L. "North Forest strives to move ahead / Beleaguered school district battles decline in student enrollment and financial strain." Houston Chronicle. Thursday March 20, 2003. ThisWeek 1. Retrieved on July 15, 2011.
  27. ^ KHOU.com staff. "North Forest ISD to merge Smiley, Forest Brook High; Tidwell, Hillard Elementary Archived 2008-04-14 at the Wayback Machine.." KHOU-TV. Sunday March 16, 2008. Retrieved on August 16, 2009.
  28. ^ "Hamilton Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  29. ^ "Hartman Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  30. ^ "Hogg Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  31. ^ "Historic District Designation Report - Norhill Historic" (Archive). City of Houston. p. 1-2/12. Retrieved on February 12, 2016.
  32. ^ a b Hardy, Michael (2014-08-03). "The Return of the Neighborhood School". Houstonia. Retrieved 2017-02-2017.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  33. ^ a b Baird, Annette. "IB program helps Hogg campus make strides" (Archive). Houston Chronicle. Tuesday April 28, 2015. Retrieved on September 26, 2015.
  34. ^ "Holland Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  35. ^ "Lawson Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  36. ^ "Marshall Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  37. ^ "McReynolds Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  38. ^ "Meyerland Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  39. ^ Lassin, Arlene Nisson (2010-04-02). "Celebration to mark 50 years for Johnston School". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2017-04-29. 
  40. ^ "Navarro Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  41. ^ "Ortiz Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  42. ^ a b "West Briar Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  43. ^ "Sugar Grove Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  44. ^ "School History." Sugar Grove Academy. Retrieved on December 24, 2016.
  45. ^ "Tanglewood Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  46. ^ "HISD meets opposition to planned school." Houston Chronicle. October 23, 1993.
  47. ^ Markley, Melanie. "Middle school to open in Briargrove area/Building once was Grady Elementary." Houston Chronicle. November 10, 1991.
  48. ^ "Welch Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  49. ^ "City Limits." Missouri City. Retrieved on January 4, 2017.
  50. ^ "Williams Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  51. ^ a b "HISD OKs plan to rezone Ryan MS students despite NAACP, community opposition." ABC13. Thursday March 7, 2013. Retrieved on March 15, 2013.
  52. ^ "Early Childhood Centers." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on November 11, 2011.
  53. ^ a b Wray, Dianna. "Everyone Says They Want the Best for North Forest Students, As Long As They Stand to Benefit." Houston Press. Wednesday October 2, 2013. p. 2. Retrieved on October 8, 2013.
  54. ^ Mellon, Ericka. "HISD officials find grim conditions at N. Forest schools." Houston Chronicle. July 3, 2013. Retrieved on October 8, 2013.
  55. ^ Virtual High School Archived 2007-06-28 at the Wayback Machine., Houston Independent School District, retrieved 2010-04-07
  56. ^ Welcome to Texas Connections Academy @ Houston, Connections Academy, retrieved 2010-04-07
  57. ^ About Us, Connections Academy, retrieved 2010-04-07
  58. ^ Markley, Melanie. "32 schools hit enrollment cap." Houston Chronicle. Thursday September 26, 1991. A17. Retrieved on April 24, 2009.
  59. ^ "Transcript Request/Inactive School Records." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 8, 2011.
  60. ^ welcome to Foleys website
  61. ^ "Board Approves School Closings and Consolidations Archived 2011-09-28 at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Independent School District. November 14, 2008.
  62. ^ "HISD is first in opening law enforcement School Archived May 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Chronicle. January 21, 1981.
  63. ^ Mellon, Ericka. "HISD will close Ryan, tables plan to merge two high schools." Houston Independent School District. March 7, 2013. Retrieved on March 14, 2013.
  64. ^ Donnelly, John. "Immigration Overload: Using schools as detention centers." KRIV. July 9, 2014. Updated July 27, 2014. Retrieved on August 9, 2014.
  65. ^ "Informed Source-August 15, 2008 Archived February 10, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Independent School District. August 15, 2008. Accessed September 12, 2008.
  66. ^ "Charter School Agreements Renewed, But Las Américas to Close Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Independent School District.