List of Houston Independent School District schools

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This is a list of schools operated by the Houston Independent School District.

In the district, grades kindergarten through 5 are considered to be elementary school, grades 6 through 8 are considered to be middle school, and grades 9 through 12 are considered to be high school. Some elementary schools go up to the sixth grade.

Every house in HISD is assigned to an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school. HISD has many alternative programs and transfer options available to students who want a specialized education and/or dislike their home schools.

Current schools[edit]

EE-12 schools[edit]

  • Thomas Horace Rogers School (Alternative school) is part Vanguard school (K-8), part school for the deaf (K-8), and part school for multiply impaired children (K-12).

EE-8 schools[edit]

Traditional:

Alternative:

  • Briarmeadow Charter School (HISD charter school) (Houston)
    • Named after the Briarmeadow community,[1] it was created in 1997, with 125 students,[2] to relieve Piney Point and three other elementary schools.[3] Briarmeadow Charter at one time rented space at the Post Oak YMCA,[2] with students using an area library and the cafeteria of T.H. Rogers School.[3]
    • It moved into a permanent 11-acre (4.5 ha) facility, with the school building being 90,000-square-foot (8,400 m2) former manufacturing warehouse, with room for 550 pupils, in 2001; the building had a value of $10 million,[3] funded by the Rebuild 2002 bond,[1] and its second floor had 7,000 square feet (650 m2) of space.[2] The classrooms are in groups with a common area linking them. The building's facilities include a cafeteria equipped with a stage and designated for multiple purposes,[3] a fine art studio with a separate entry area[2] and an attached music studio[3] with high-acoustic capabilities, two computer laboratories, a library, a multimedia room, a music studio, two language laboratories, and a science laboratory.[2] Athletic fields, a nature area, and playgrounds use an outdoor area with 11 acres (4.5 ha) of space.[3] HISD had plans to use the second floor as administrative offices. It had 220 students in June 2001,[2] increasing to 350 by September of that year.[3]

PK-8 schools[edit]

  • Garden Oaks K-8 School (Houston) (Zoned for K-5, magnet for K-8)
  • Thomas J. Pilgrim Academy (Zoned school) (Houston)
    • The school was built in 1957, on the sesquicentennial of the birth of Thomas J. Pilgrim, and opened as Thomas J. Pilgrim Elementary School.[5] In 2006 it began adding middle school grades,[6] and in 2007 it changed its name to its current one and moved into its current location.[5] Principal Alma Salman arranged to have middle school grades added so the school could have more time to increase student performance so it meets their grade levels. As of 2011 85% of the students at Pilgrim are low income, and about 66% of students who are new to Pilgrim have limited proficiency of English, with Spanish and Arabic being the most common native languages. As of 2011 250 students are in grades 6-8. In 2011 Children at Risk ranked the Pilgrim middle school as the best comprehensive middle school program in Houston.[6]
  • The Rusk School (Houston) (magnet for K-8, will become 6-8 only)
    • Rusk is in the Second Ward,[7] at Garrow and Paige Streets, near Settegast Park.[8]
    • Rusk, named after Thomas Jefferson Rusk, was built in 1902.[1] When Clayton Homes initially opened in 1952, Rusk served as its neighborhood elementary school. The old Rusk was demolished so U.S. Route 59 (Eastex Freeway) could be built, and Clayton Homes students were rezoned to Anson Jones Elementary. However HISD perceived Anson Jones's proximity to US59 to be a hazard, and Clayton Homes residents had difficulties with their commute due to traffic issues. HISD built a new Rusk Elementary, opening in 1960, at its current location.[8] Clayton Homes was rezoned to that school, and the new Rusk also relieved Lubbock Elementary School.[9]
    • In a period before 1996 Rusk added middle school grades. Principal Felipa Young spearheaded the initiative because she noticed graduates of Rusk encountering academic or disciplinary trouble in large comprehensive middle schools.[10] Beginning in the 2016-2017 school year the elementary zoned grades at Rusk will be phased out. The portions of the Second Ward were be rezoned to Burnet Elementary School and Lantrip Elementary School. PreKindergarten through grade 2 at Rusk will be phased out immediately, with 3-5 being phased out in the following five years; elementary grades for Rusk were phased out by fall 2019.[11][12]
  • Wharton Dual Language Academy (Houston, elementary zoned, K-8 magnet)
  • Wilson Montessori School (PK3 through 6 zoned, PK3-8 Montessori and fine arts magnet) (Houston)

Carter G. Woodson K-8 Center in Houston formerly had PK-8; since 2018 is now has PK-5.[15] Middle school students were rezoned to Albert Thomas Middle.[16]

K-8 schools[edit]

(Zoned)

  • Billy K. Reagan K-8 Educational Center (opening in the 2010s)[17]

(Alternative)

Secondary schools[edit]

6-12 schools[edit]

7-12 schools[edit]

High schools[edit]

Zoned high schools[edit]

AAAAAA (Division 6A)

AAAAA (Division 5A)

AAAA (Division 4A)

AAA (Division 3A)

  • Scarborough High School is in northwest Houston and is the smallest public high school in HISD, with only around 750 students.
Other high schools[edit]

AAAAA (Division 5A)

No UIL ranking:

Middle schools[edit]

West Briar Middle School in Parkway Villages
Traditional middle schools[edit]
  • Crispus Attucks Middle School (Houston)
    • Serves Sunnyside and sections of South Park[26]
    • Circa 2019 over 40% of the teachers in each school year are not present in the following school year.[27]
  • Frank Black Middle School (Houston)
  • Luther Burbank Middle School (Houston)
    • Burbank High School opened in 1927. The school was converted into a junior high school and received a new building in 1949. Burbank received a Vanguard magnet school program in 1979; it had been moved from Terrell Junior High. In the 1980s the grade configuration changed from grades 7-9 to 6-8, and the name was changed to Burbank Middle School.[29]
    • In 1996 most of the students were from recent immigrants, and 87% of the students were Hispanic. The large number of immigrant students prompted the school to start special classes for bilingual students. By then the school held parent-teacher meetings in Spanish as well as English. Previously the school only had a summary of each meeting in Spanish, but as a result participation from Hispanophone parents was low.[30]
  • Ruby Sue Clifton Middle School (Houston)
  • Ezekiel W. Cullen Middle School (Houston)
  • James S. Deady Middle School (Houston)
    • Serves sections of the East End[33]
    • Deady's student body became a majority of racial and ethnic minorities in the early 1980s.[34]
  • Thomas A. Edison Middle School (Houston)
  • Lamar Fleming Middle School (Houston)
  • Walter W. Fondren Middle School (Houston)
  • Richard H. Fonville Middle School] (Houston)
  • Forest Brook Middle School (Houston)
    • The building opened in 1972 as Forest Brook High School.[37] The purpose of the building changed after the 2008 merger of Forest Brook with M. B. Smiley High School.[38] Forest Brook Middle School became a part of HISD during the merger with the North Forest Independent School District on July 1, 2013.[19]
    • When HISD assumed control, the facilities were in a damaged state, 30-40% of students were habitually late to school, and 75-80% of students performed below grade level. Rick Fernandez became principal in 2013, and Tannisha Gentry, his assistant, succeeded him when he left to become principal of North Forest High School in 2015. Fernandez and Gentry changed the school uniforms, posted teachers in areas where students may hide, and penalized truancy with lunch detentions. Gentry added a study period and added one hour to the instructional day. Hurricane Harvey, in 2017, damaged the building and displaced students from nearby neighborhoods. By November 2017 80 students were not in attendance.[39]
  • Alexander Hamilton Middle School (Houston)
    • Serves much of the Houston Heights and a section of Independence Heights[40]
    • Hamilton previously had the Indians as a mascot, but in 2014 it adopted a new mascot, the Huskies, due to controversies over Native American naming.[41]
  • Charles Hartman Middle School (Houston)
  • Patrick Henry Middle School (Houston)
  • James Hogg Middle School (Houston)
    • Serves Woodland Heights, Norhill, sections of the Houston Heights, Cottage Grove, First Ward, Sixth Ward, Rice Military, and Crestwood/Glen Cove[43]
    • Hogg, named after Governor of Texas James Stephen Hogg, was built on land that was reserved for school usage by the developer of Norhill.[44] James Hogg's family had donated the land occupied by the school.[45] It has 735 students as of 2015. 87% of the students are designated as low income, and the student body is majority Hispanic. The school occupies a three story 1920s building. The school uses the International Baccalaureate program.[46]
    • Hogg's student body became mostly racial minority in the late 1970s.[34] In the 2011-2012 school year, it had 700 students. 90% were Hispanic or Latino, 5% were black, and 3% were white. Almost all of the students were classified as low income through their qualifying for free or reduced lunches. As of 2011 few Woodland Heights/Norhill-area parents sent their children to Hogg, and they instead used HISD middle schools in other areas. As of 2014 the school's test scores were below average. By 2014 the IB program had been established, the number of disciplinary reports declined and became among the smallest in the entire district. There were efforts from area parents to attract graduates of Travis and Harvard elementary schools, two major feeder schools, to Hogg, and by 2014 the number of children from Travis and Harvard matriculating to Hogg increased by fewer than 50%.[45] In 2015 Annette Baird of the Houston Chronicle wrote that historically "had a reputation for poor student performance and low enrollment" but that it was increasing in popularity with local parents.[46]
  • Holland Middle School
  • Francis Scott Key Middle School (Houston)
  • Bob Lanier Middle School (formerly Sidney Lanier Middle School) (Houston)
  • Audrey H. Lawson Middle School (formerly Richard W. "Dick" Dowling Middle School) (Houston)
  • John Marshall Middle School (Houston) [opened in 1914 as North End Junior High School]
  • John L. McReynolds Middle School (Houston)
  • Meyerland Performing and Visual Arts Middle School (formerly Albert Sidney Johnston Middle School) (Houston)
  • Yolanda Black Navarro Middle School (formerly Stonewall Jackson Middle School) (Houston)
  • Daniel Ortiz, Jr. Middle School (Houston)
  • John J. Pershing Middle School, in Houston, is a fine arts, neighborhood, and gifted and talented Middle School. Pershing celebrated its 75th anniversary in the 2003-2004 school year.
  • Pin Oak Middle School (Bellaire) is a foreign language magnet, and gifted and talented Middle School. Pin Oak does not have an attendance zone, students have to apply to get in.
  • Paul Revere Middle School (Houston) (6-8)
  • W. I. Stevenson Middle School (Houston)
  • Sugar Grove Middle School (Houston)
    • Serves sections of Sharpstown and sections of Chinatown as well as other parts of the Southwest Management District[60]
    • It was established in 2008; the campus was previously the unzoned relief elementary school Sugar Grove Elementary School, named after a church that previously occupied the school's current location.[61]
    • In the period 2009 to 2019, the school had "improvement required" ratings from the State of Texas for four of those years. Each year, about 37% of the teachers present in one school year are not in the next. There were five principals in a period circa 2009 to 2019. Circa 2014, 925 students in the Sugar Grove attendance zone attended schools other than Sugar Grove middle. This increased to 1,200 circa 2019.[27]
  • Tanglewood Middle School (formerly Henry W. Grady Middle School) (Houston)
    • Serves Tanglewood and Briargrove as well as a small section of Hunters Creek Village[62]
    • Grady Middle School opened in 1992.[63] The campus previously housed an elementary school, and was re-opened as a middle school because area parents thought Revere Middle School was too far away.[64]
  • Albert Thomas Middle School (Houston)
  • Louie Welch Middle School (Houston)
    • Serves sections of Fondren Southwest and Missouri City[65][66]
    • Welch's campus was built for about 1,133 students. In 1996 it had 1,700 students. There were also issues with the sewage system in the temporary building area as well as roof leaks and water issues from condensation.[67]
    • Welch previously had the Warriors as a mascot, but in 2014 it adopted a new mascot, the Wolf Pack, due to controversies over Native American naming.[41]
  • West Briar Middle School (Houston)
  • McKinley C. Williams Middle School (Houston)

The Carter G. Woodson School formerly had middle school levels, later became PK-8, and now is PK-5. Notable alumni of the middle school:

Other middle schools[edit]

Primary schools[edit]

Early Childhood Centers[edit]

Gabriela Mistral Early Childhood Center
  • Ashford Early Childhood Center (Houston)[72]
  • Bellfort Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • David "Davy" Crockett Early Childhood Center (Houston) (The campus was formerly Brock Elementary School - Elementary students were rezoned to Crockett ES)
  • Early Childhood Center (Houston, opening August 2005)
  • Fonwood Early Childhood Center
    • Originally Fonwood Elementary School of the North Forest Independent School District,[19] it was built in 1964.[37] Prior to NFISD's closure, the district had been planning to close Fonwood Elementary.[73] HISD converted Fonwood into the area's early childhood center after the takeover effective July 1, 2013.[19] It was one of the older schools of NFISD. HISD released statements highlighting the poor condition of Fonwood Elementary when doing a post-takeover tour of the school. In a tour of the campus in July 2013, Terry Grier noted a playground in poor condition, water fountains too tall for children, exposed wires, violins without strings stored in the music room, and a restroom which had a bad odor. The teacher's lounge had a plush couch, upholstered chairs, flowers, and a flatscreen television.[74] HISD did not state that NFISD was planning to close Fonwood.[73] It became an early childhood center when NFISD merged into HISD on July 1, 2013.[19]
  • Sharon Goldstein Halpin Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • Ninfa Laurenzo Early Childhood Center (Houston)
  • Gabriela Mistral Early Childhood Center (Houston, opened August 2005)

Interagency Alternative Schools[edit]

  • Beechnut Academy Southwest
  • Beechnut Academy Southeast

Online learning[edit]

HISD has an online high school offering regular, AP, and credit-recovery courses at its virtual school. For grades 3-12 offers online schooling through Texas Connections Academy @ Houston, which is operated under contract by Connections Academy, a Maryland-based company which works with public and other schools to provide online education.[75][76][77]

Defunct schools[edit]

Former K-12 schools[edit]

Former secondary schools[edit]

  • New Aspirations Charter School [6]

Former 7-12 schools[edit]

Former high schools[edit]

Zoned

Alternative

  • DeVry Advantage Academy (Houston)
  • Foley's Academy (Houston)[81]
    • Foley's Academy (1987-2000) was an alternative high school where students advanced at their own pace. It featured one-on-one learning and catered to at-risk students to prevent them from dropping out. Former first lady Barbara Bush and Dr. Joan Raymond headed the opening ceremony by signing in the first three students: Twanna Lynn, Shannon Gladney and Robert Martinez.[citation needed]
  • New Aspirations Academy High School (Houston) (closed 2012)
  • Ninth Grade Academy (Houston)
  • Middle College For Technology Careers (Houston) (opened in 1994, closed in 2006)
  • Houston Drop Back In Academy (Houston) - Closed[79]

High school programs formerly affiliated

Former K-8 and 1-8 schools[edit]

Alternative:

Former middle schools[edit]

Former zoned schools

  • Lockett Junior High School (303 West Dallas, opened in former Booker T. Washington High School building in 1959, closed June 1968[79])
  • Longfellow Junior High School (2202 St. Emanuel, Houston) (Built in 1913, converted into Dunbar Elementary in 1961[79])
  • Miller Junior High School (Houston) (Campus now houses Young Women's College Preparatory Academy)
  • James D. Ryan Middle School (Houston) - Closed in 2013,[88] building now used for The Medical and Health Professions Academy at Ryan Middle School[71]
  • Terrell Middle School (Houston) (Opened 1966, later became an alternative school, closed in 2001[79]) - As of 2014 it serves as an immigration detention center for children[89]
    • In 1996 its students had disciplinary records that caused them to be expelled from their previous schools. Circa 1996 the annual cost per student incurred by each student was over $16,000; around that time the average per-student cost in Houston-area school districts was $4,000-$5,000.[90]

Other schools

  • Kaleidoscope Middle School (Houston) (Moved to 6501 Bellaire Boulevard from 5909 Glenmont in 2007 [7]) - Combined into Long Middle in 2012 [8]

Former primary schools[edit]

Former early childhood centers[edit]

Langston Family Life Center, formerly Langston Early Childhood Center

2 in Houston

  • Concord Early Childhood Center (Houston)
    • Concord, located on the site of Kashmere Gardens Elementary School, closed due to low enrollment. The students will be a part of the Kashmere Gardens population.[91]
  • Langston Early Childhood Center (2815 Campbell, Opened 1994, closed May 2004,[79] Students transferred to Crawford ES)
  • Las Américas Early Childhood Development Center (5909 Glenmont, Houston) (5909 Glenmont, 77081) (Closed in 2007[92])
  • Wheatley Child Development (4900 Market, Houston, Opened 1993, closed 2007[79])

Former alternative centers[edit]

  • The Harris County Youth Village in far southern Pasadena, west of Seabrook, opened in 1972. The center was no longer affiliated with HISD in 1997.[79]

References[edit]

  • Kirkland, Kate Sayen. The Hogg Family and Houston: Philanthropy and the Civic Ideal. University of Texas Press, September 21, 2012. ISBN 0292748469, 9780292748460.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Elementary/Middle School Combinations." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on November 6, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Baird, Annette (2001-06-07). "Houston charter school moving into new facility". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-11-05. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Baird, Annette (2001-09-06). "Charter school opens with new permanent facilities". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-11-06. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  4. ^ "Garden Oaks K-8 Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 9, 2016.
  5. ^ a b "History" (Archive). Thomas J. Pilgrim Academy. Retrieved on November 29, 2015.
  6. ^ a b Mellon, Ericka. "Despite the odds, Pilgrim Academy hits the mark" (Archive). Houston Chronicle. Monday April 18, 2011. Retrieved on November 29, 2015.
  7. ^ "'Stros open Enron stadium in 'Classic' business decision." Houston Business Journal. Sunday December 17, 2000. 3. "Mama Ninfa Laurenzo hosted a party this week for 150 children between the ages of six and 10 years old from Anson Jones and Rusk Elementary schools in the Second Ward." Retrieved on February 6, 2012.
  8. ^ a b De León, Arnoldo. Ethnicity in the Sunbelt: Mexican Americans in Houston. Texas A&M University Press, 2001. ISBN 158544149X, 9781585441495. p. 101.
  9. ^ De León, Arnoldo. Ethnicity in the Sunbelt: Mexican Americans in Houston. Texas A&M University Press, 2001. ISBN 158544149X, 9781585441495. p. 102.
  10. ^ Markley, Melanie (1996-10-03). "Parents, teachers struggle with enigma called middle school". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-04-23. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  11. ^ "Approved Attendance Boundary Maps for 2016-2017." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on June 11, 2016.
  12. ^ "Approved Boundaries 16-17" (EaDo Final Boundaries). Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on June 11, 2016.
  13. ^ "Wharton K-8 Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 9, 2016.
  14. ^ "Wilson K-8 Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 9, 2016.
  15. ^ "AGENDA Board of Education Meeting May 10, 2018." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on October 12, 2018. F1 p. 90/135.
  16. ^ "HISD Board of Education approves recommendation for external performance audit". Houston Defender. 2018-05-14. Retrieved 2018-10-17. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  17. ^ "New Schools to Be Named After Former Superintendent and U.S. Judge Archived 2011-09-28 at the Wayback Machine." Houston Independent School District. January 14, 2009.
  18. ^ "Board Approves High School for Business and Economic Success." Houston Independent School District. June 15, 2009. Retrieved on August 23, 2009.
  19. ^ a b c d e "Principals selected, changes proposed for North Forest schools." (Archive) Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on June 14, 2013.
  20. ^ [1]
  21. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program, Schools Recognized 1982-1983 Through 1999-2002 (PDF) Archived March 26, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  22. ^ a b c Microsoft Word - list-2003.doc
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  24. ^ a b Houston Academy for International Studies
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  27. ^ a b Carpenter, Jacob (2019-08-05). "Revolving door: Teachers, principals churn through HISD's lowest-performing schools". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-08-06.
  28. ^ a b "Black Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  29. ^ "History." Burbank Middle School. Retrieved on January 6, 2017.
  30. ^ Benjaminson, Wendy (1996-10-13). "The best teachers possess "people" attitude, skills". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-04-24.
  31. ^ "Black Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  32. ^ "Cullen Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  33. ^ "Deady Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  34. ^ a b c San Miguel, Guadalupe. Brown, Not White: School Integration and the Chicano Movement in Houston (Volume 3 of University of Houston Series in Mexican American Studies, Sponsored by the Center for Mexican American Studies). Texas A&M University Press, October 26, 2005. ISBN 1585444936, 9781585444939. CITED: p. 219.
  35. ^ "Fleming Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  36. ^ "Fondren Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  37. ^ a b "Chapter 5 FACILITIES USE AND MANAGEMENT NORTH FOREST INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT." (Archive) Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts. Retrieved on November 21, 2011.
  38. ^ KHOU.com staff. "North Forest ISD to merge Smiley, Forest Brook High; Tidwell, Hillard Elementary Archived 2008-04-14 at the Wayback Machine." KHOU-TV. Sunday March 16, 2008. Retrieved on August 16, 2009.
  39. ^ Fanelli, Joseph (2017-11-07). "Forest Brook Middle School Students Are Making Up For Lost Time". Houston Press. Retrieved 2017-11-13. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  40. ^ "Hamilton Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  41. ^ a b Mellon, Ericka (2014-04-15). "New HISD mascots: Huskies, Wolf Pack, Texans". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-12-30. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  42. ^ "Hartman Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  43. ^ "Hogg Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  44. ^ "Historic District Designation Report - Norhill Historic" (Archive). City of Houston. p. 1-2/12. Retrieved on February 12, 2016.
  45. ^ a b Hardy, Michael (2014-08-03). "The Return of the Neighborhood School". Houstonia. Retrieved 2017-02-2017. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help); Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  46. ^ a b Baird, Annette. "IB program helps Hogg campus make strides" (Archive). Houston Chronicle. Tuesday April 28, 2015. Retrieved on September 26, 2015.
  47. ^ "Holland Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
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  52. ^ "School Names Changed". The Galveston Daily News. Jul 8, 1925. Retrieved 22 March 2019.
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  56. ^ "Navarro Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  57. ^ "Ortiz Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  58. ^ Rosen, Dsp (2005-05-26). "Ortiz remembered for drive, dedication". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-04-03. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  59. ^ a b "West Briar Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  60. ^ "Sugar Grove Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  61. ^ "School History." Sugar Grove Academy. Retrieved on December 24, 2016.
  62. ^ "Tanglewood Middle School Attendance Boundary." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  63. ^ "HISD meets opposition to planned school." Houston Chronicle. October 23, 1993.
  64. ^ Markley, Melanie. "Middle school to open in Briargrove area/Building once was Grady Elementary." Houston Chronicle. November 10, 1991.
  65. ^ "Welch Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  66. ^ "City Limits." Missouri City. Retrieved on January 4, 2017.
  67. ^ Kliewer, Terry (1996-10-08). "Overcrowded, aging facilities a growing problem". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-04-23. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  68. ^ "Williams Middle School Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 7, 2016.
  69. ^ Lomax, John Nova. "South Park Monster." Houston Press. Thursday June 6, 2002. 2. Retrieved on February 6, 2011.
  70. ^ Lomax, John Nova. "South Park Monster." Houston Press. Thursday June 6, 2002. 3. Retrieved on February 6, 2011.
  71. ^ a b "HISD OKs plan to rezone Ryan MS students despite NAACP, community opposition." ABC13. Thursday March 7, 2013. Retrieved on March 15, 2013.
  72. ^ "Early Childhood Centers." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on November 11, 2011.
  73. ^ a b Wray, Dianna. "Everyone Says They Want the Best for North Forest Students, As Long As They Stand to Benefit." Houston Press. Wednesday October 2, 2013. p. 2. Retrieved on October 8, 2013.
  74. ^ Mellon, Ericka. "HISD officials find grim conditions at N. Forest schools." Houston Chronicle. July 3, 2013. Retrieved on October 8, 2013.
  75. ^ Virtual High School Archived 2007-06-28 at the Wayback Machine, Houston Independent School District, retrieved 2010-04-07
  76. ^ Welcome to Texas Connections Academy @ Houston, Connections Academy, retrieved 2010-04-07
  77. ^ About Us, Connections Academy, retrieved 2010-04-07
  78. ^ Markley, Melanie. "32 schools hit enrollment cap." Houston Chronicle. Thursday September 26, 1991. A17. Retrieved on April 24, 2009.
  79. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "School Histories: the Stories Behind the Names Archived July 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine." (Archive) Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on September 24, 2008.
  80. ^ "Transcript Request/Inactive School Records." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on December 8, 2011.
  81. ^ welcome to Foleys website
  82. ^ Public housing needs and conditions in Houston: hearings before the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development of the Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-ninth Congress, first session, Part 1. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1986. p. 274. The resident children of APV attend the Gregory Elementary School or the Lincoln Junior-Senior High School. The Gregory School accomodates from kindergarten through the eighth grade. Approximately 512 students within this school[...] - The page is from p. 212 a United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) report embedded in the record.
  83. ^ Public housing needs and conditions in Houston: hearings before the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development of the Committee on Banking, Finance, and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-ninth Congress, first session, Part 1. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1986. p. 511. The Houston Independent School District (HISD) operated two schools in the Fourth Ward in the 1979-1980 school year: Gregory Elementary and Lincoln Junior High School. HISD closed Gregory Elementary School at the end of the 1979-80[...] - - From page III-2 of a report - Also seen in search result
  84. ^ Turner, Allan. "REBIRTH OF AN ICON Once the center of community life, the Edgar Gregory School had fallen on hard times Black history library to honor Fourth Ward SCHOOL: Research library is slated to open in just over a month." Houston Chronicle. December 13, 2009. p. B1. Retrieved on December 13, 2009.
  85. ^ "Board Approves School Closings and Consolidations Archived 2011-09-28 at the Wayback Machine." Houston Independent School District. November 14, 2008.
  86. ^ "HISD is first in opening law enforcement School Archived May 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine." Houston Chronicle. January 21, 1981.
  87. ^ Ehling, Jeff (2018-08-14). "Parents outraged to learn HISD closing charter school just before classes should start". KTRK-TV. Retrieved 2018-09-20. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  88. ^ Mellon, Ericka. "HISD will close Ryan, tables plan to merge two high schools." Houston Independent School District. March 7, 2013. Retrieved on March 14, 2013.
  89. ^ Donnelly, John. "Immigration Overload: Using schools as detention centers." KRIV. July 9, 2014. Updated July 27, 2014. Retrieved on August 9, 2014.
  90. ^ Markley, Melanie (1996-10-04). "Numbers don't always add up in per-student spending". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 2019-04-28. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  91. ^ "Informed Source-August 15, 2008 Archived February 10, 2012, at the Wayback Machine." Houston Independent School District. August 15, 2008. Accessed September 12, 2008.
  92. ^ "Charter School Agreements Renewed, But Las Américas to Close Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine." Houston Independent School District.