IARC group 2A

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IARC group 2A agents are substances and exposure circumstances that have been classified as probable carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).[1] This designation is applied when there is limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, as well as sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. In some cases, an agent may be classified in this group when there is inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity in humans along with sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals and strong evidence that the carcinogenesis is mediated by a mechanism that also operates in humans. Exceptionally, an agent may be classified in this group solely on the basis of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans.

This list is focusing on the hazard linked to the agents. This means that the carcinogenic agents are capable of causing cancer, but this does not take their risk into account, which is the probability of causing a cancer given the level of exposure to this carcinogenic agent.[2] The list is uptodate as of January 2024.[3]

Agents[edit]

Substances[edit]

Pathogens[edit]

Mixtures[edit]

Exposure circumstances[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Classifications, Agents classified by the IARC Monographs, Volumes 1–124". IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Risk to Humans. IARC. July 7, 2019. Retrieved July 14, 2019.
  2. ^ "IARC monographs preamble (as amended in 2019)" (PDF). International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Retrieved August 18, 2023. A cancer hazard is an agent that is capable of causing cancer, whereas a cancer risk is an estimate of the probability that cancer will occur given some level of exposure to a cancer hazard.
  3. ^ "List of Classifications – IARC Monographs on the Identification of Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans". monographs.iarc.who.int. Retrieved 2024-02-01.
  4. ^ "IARC Monographs evaluate consumption of red meat and processed meat" (PDF). Retrieved 26 October 2015.
  5. ^ Loomis, Dana; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Lauby-Sectretan, Béatrice; El Ghissassi, Fatiha; Bouvard, Véronique; Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Guha, Neela; Mattock, Heidi; Straif, Kurt (July 1, 2016). "Carcinogenicity of drinking coffee, mate, and very hot beverages". The Lancet Oncology. Elsevier. 17 (7): 877–8. doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(16)30239-X. PMID 27318851.
  6. ^ "Drinking Coffee, Mate, and Very Hot Beverages, IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans, Volumes 116". IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Risk to Humans. IARC. June 13, 2018. Retrieved July 14, 2019.

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